How United Airlines Became “Less Awful”

Bringing back free snacks in Economy class and upgrading the coffee are central to United Airlines’ efforts to reintroduce itself to customers, reports Bloomberg Business. “More fundamentally, United is reexamining the way it boards planes.” The airline “came up with a system with only two main lanes: one for the group currently boarding and one for the group that was next. To preserve the prerogative of late-arriving priority passengers, a ‘bypass’ lane was added.”

United is also re-designing its routes, moving from “linear routing” that “maximizes the hours each aircraft is in the air full of revenue-generating customers, but bad weather at one airport can cause delays and cancellations among numerous routes.” It now uses more “out-and-back” routing and “also increased the amount of time budgeted for turning planes around.”

“Recent months have seen marked improvements in United’s performance. Its on-time and missed-connections metrics over the past few months have been the best since the merger. Its rates for mishandled baggage are also sharply down … New planes have steadily been replacing older ones. And fliers are happier: Internal customer satisfaction scores were better in 2015 than in 2014, better in the fourth quarter of 2015 than in the third, and in December were the highest in two years.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Don’t Let Them Eat Cake

Some restaurants now charge a “cakeage” fee to patrons who bring their own celebratory cake, reports The New York Times. At some restaurants the fee is as much as $14 per person. Some patrons are outraged, but so are some of the chefs, who think that bringing a supermarket cake into their restaurants is an “abomination.”

At WD-50 in New York, the pastry chef “didn’t want anyone in the dining room to see it and think it was coming out of his kitchen.” At Miller Union in Atlanta, owner Neal McCarthy complains: “These people sought out a nice restaurant, yet they undermine it by bringing in the world’s most hideous cakes.”

However, Vinny Accardi of Room 55 in Queens, New York takes a more accommodating view: “It’s a restaurant and it’s the hospitality industry,” he says. “The whole goal is to make people have a good time.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Like Amazon for Your Diet

“Research increasingly suggests that each of us is unique in the way we absorb and metabolize nutrients,” reports The New York Times. “This dawning realization has scientists and entrepreneurs scrambling to provide more effective nutritional advice based on such distinguishing factors as genetic makeup, gut bacteria, body type and chemical exposures.”

Dr. Eran Elinav of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel “found a startling variation in the glucose responses of 800 subjects fed the same foods … By combining data gleaned from subjects’ glucose responses with information about their gut bacteria, medications, family histories and lifestyles, the scientists devised an algorithm that accurately predicted blood sugar responses to foods the participants hadn’t yet eaten in the study.”

“The algorithm is similar to what Amazon uses to tell you which books you want to read,” says Eran Segal, also of Weizmann and a co-author of the study. “We just do it with food.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

App-etite for Munchery

Bloomberg Business: “Munchery is one of dozens of technology startups around the world trying to solve the challenge of mealtime planning with the tap of an app. GrubHub in the U.S., Just Eat in Europe, and Ele.me in China, to name just a few, all connect Internet users with restaurants and their takeout menus. Critics derisively call the proliferation of these businesses the “lazy food economy,” but Munchery is different. It cooks and delivers its own relatively healthy fare.”

“The company is in four cities—San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, and Seattle—operating industrial kitchens in each. One recent afternoon in San Francisco, chefs and their assistants, wearing white caps and long-sleeved smocks, toiled over trays of grilled salmon atop brown rice with edamame and sweet carrots ($10.99) and pork belly buns with hoisin sauce, shredded cabbage, and pickled daikon ($10.95) … After they’re prepared, the dishes are chilled in refrigerated rooms, packed in compostable boxes, and loaded into cars for delivery. Customers heat them up for about two minutes in a microwave or 10 to 20 in an oven.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Americans Are Loving Bowls

“Sales of bowls are rising as Americans prefer more casual, one-course meals that layer flavors,” The Wall Street Journal reports. Tableware makers are reconfiguring place settings. Restaurants are overhauling their china cabinets. Consumers are increasingly cradling their food while perched at kitchen islands, lounging on sofas or multi-tasking at a table.”

“The trend began as a way to make healthy entrees more appealing. If eggs and vegetables are piled into a bowl rather than on a plate, the diner is less likely to mourn the missing bread.” Juliet Boghossian of Foodology comments: “You’re taking away all the carbs, like toast, muffins and potatoes, but you don’t see the empty space on the plate.” Designer Ree Drummond adds: “A bowl is much more flexible and open to interpretation compared to a plate.”

Rebecca Proctor of Aurora Brands says: “The rise of the bowl is really evidence of the shift in our lifestyle from more formal to casual.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

How Netflix Beats Amazon

The difference between the way Netflix and Amazon use big data is the difference between a hit and an also ran, reports The Observer. Data scientist Sebastian Wernicke, in a TED Talk, “explained how two shows, which were strategically made with data analysis methods creators thought would ensure Breaking Bad caliber success, were created, and how they faired in the ratings. One, Netflix’s House of Cards, worked—the show went on to score a 9.1 on the rating curve. The other, Amazon’s Alpha House, however, fell short and landed at 7.5 on the curving, marking it as a completely average show.”

“When Amazon set out to make a data-driven show, the company held a competition. They evaluated a bunch of show ideas, selected eight of them and then created a pilot episode for each and made them available online for free. Millions watched the free episodes, and the company used data (such as how many people watched each show, how long they watched and what parts they skipped) to create a show they hoped would be destined for greatness. After crunching millions of data points, the results said they should create a sitcom about four Republican U.S. senators. Alpha House was born.”

“Around the same time, Netflix was brewing up something similar. But instead of using a competition, the company looked at the data they already had about viewing on their platform (ratings, viewing history, etc). They used that data to discover small bits and pieces about what viewers like and took a leap of faith … Amazon’s show wasn’t a booming success because it used data all the way. Netflix, however, looked at what users like and used that insight to think up a concept for what they believed would be a hit show, and it clearly worked.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Behind-the-Scenes at IKEA

Mental Floss: “Nineteen behind-the-scenes secrets of IKEA employees.” Among the gems: “The winding walkway is known lovingly among employees as the Long Natural Path or the Long Natural Way. According to a 2011 New Yorker article by Lauren Collins, the pathway is supposed to curve every 50 feet to prevent shoppers from getting bored.”

“There are multiple quick routes through the store, both for safety reasons and stocking reasons, and they’re open to the public. But they’re not advertised, so you’ll need a keen eye for secret passageways … If you’re the passive-aggressive type of shopper, you’re bound to be disappointed at IKEA. Employees are given specific instructions to let the customers come to them if they need assistance.”

“Lovers’ quarrels are so common in the store that at least one psychologist told the Wall Street Journal she has her bickering clients construct the Nornäs coffee table as a relationship-building exercise.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Bitter & Esters

The New York Times: “Except for maybe that final celebratory phase, home brewing seems to be a solitary endeavor. But at Bitter & Esters, a home-brew shop in Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, hopeful brewers discuss all parts of the process with like-minded beer aficionados, from the minutiae (and there is quite a lot of detail) to the merrymaking when an especially good batch is turned out.”

“I know there’s a picture of a guy brewing by himself,” said John LaPolla, an owner of Bitter & Esters, on a recent evening. “But it’s really not like that. It’s a community.”

Although Bitter & Esters is not a tavern and does not have a license to actually sell beer, “we can give tastes educationally,” Mr. LaPolla said. And they educate, liberally. The shop offers about 10 classes a month, with options for beginners through advanced brewers. Those classes, Mr. LaPolla happily admits, are “brilliant marketing.” “We make our own customer,” he said.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Your Mouse Says You’re Angry

The Wall Street Journal: “Santa Claus probably knew if you were naughty or nice, but your computer mouse knows whether you are angry, fearful or stressed. The part about the mouse, at least, comes from a new paper by researchers at universities on both sides of the Atlantic. Building on prior research into mood and muscle control, the scientists show that bad feelings increase the distance and reduce the speed of mouse-cursor movements, which could let computers detect users’ emotional states from their clicks.”

“The scientists found that mouse movements allowed them to detect the presence of negative emotion with 82% accuracy … One obvious application for these findings: Web developers could alter their pages based on which areas or tasks seem to induce telltale cursor movements indicating user unhappiness. Companies might even build in automated apologies—or notify customer service—when a user’s mouse movements indicate that a frustration threshold has been reached.”

“Why do bad feelings influence mouse movements? The scientists think that negative emotions impair the brain’s processing capacity and undermine users’ ability to focus.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Same Old Story

The Atlantic: “Storytelling has a shape. It dominates the way all stories are told and can be traced back not just to the Renaissance, but to the very beginnings of the recorded word. It’s a structure that we absorb avidly whether in art-house or airport form and it’s a shape that may be—though we must be careful—a universal archetype …

Storytelling is an indispensable human preoccupation, as important to us all—almost—as breathing. From the mythical campfire tale to its explosion in the post-television age, it dominates our lives. It behooves us then to try to understand it. Delacroix countered the fear of knowledge succinctly: “First learn to be a craftsman; it won’t keep you from being a genius.” In stories throughout the ages there is one motif that continually recurs—the journey into the woods to find the dark but life-giving secret within.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail