Daniel Lubestsky: Cool to be Kind

Speaking at Brite ’16, Daniel Lubetsky, founder of Kind, says that 90 percent or more of those who buy the snack bars are unaware of its social mission, which, naturally, is to promote kindness. The priority is that they buy into the brand as a quality product. That said, a community of kindness is promoted in at least three ways:

1) Kindawesome Cards. When someone is kind to you, visit howkindofyou.com and have a kindawsome card, good for two Kind bars, sent to him or her. It’s on the honor system. 2) Kind Causes. A website where you can nominate causes. Each month the “community” votes for a favorite, which gets $10,000. 3) Kind Foundation. A celebration of “kind” people who are making a difference in their communities, with a total of one million dollars in awards.


How Walmart & Whole Foods Shoppers Are Alike

Perfect Price: “The distribution of spending at Whole Foods and Walmart —stores that are diametrically opposed in the cultural imagination —are actually quite similar in terms of the distribution of spend. Slightly more people spend less than $25 on a trip to Whole Foods, and slightly more spend between $25-$100 at Walmart, but overall, the distribution of how much people spend on trips to these stores are remarkably alike.”

“Far and away, consumers spend the most at Costco, the third largest retailer in the United States … At the very bottom of the list is 7-Eleven, the largest convenience store chain in the United States. The average spend per trip at 7-Eleven is less than 15% of that at Costco … The average spend for trips to Walmart, Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s all fall in the range of $50-$55 .. Trader Joe’s shoppers are heavily concentrated in the $10-$100 range with nearly 9 out of every ten falling in the category.”



Late & Great: @ Ray Tomlinson

Engadget: “It’s a sad day for the Internet: Ray Tomlinson, widely credited with inventing email as we know it, has died … In 1971, he established the first networked email system on ARPANET (the internet’s ancestor), using the familiar user@host format that’s still in use today. It wasn’t until 1977 that his approach became a standard, and years more before it emerged victorious, but it’s safe to say that communication hasn’t been the same ever since.”

“His choice of the @ symbol for email popularized a once-niche character, making it synonymous with all things internet. Arguably, he paved the way for modern social networks in the process … barring a sea change in communication, it’s likely that the effect of his work will be felt for decades to come.”


Sugru: The Play-Doh of Glue

The New York Times: “Sugru is a moldable glue. It looks like Play-Doh, can be shaped around any object, sticks to almost any material, is waterproof, is heat-resistant and dries to a silicone rubbery finish in 24 hours. Its ability to bond to virtually any surface — wood, glass, metals and ceramics among others — and its moldable nature make it unusual in the world of adhesives, sealants and glues.”

“I wanted to design something that was so easy and so fun to use that more people would consider fixing things again,” said Jane Ni Dhulchaointigh, the Irish entrepreneur behind Sugru.

“Ms. Ni Dhulchaointigh said Sugru could withstand temperatures as high as 356 degrees and as low as minus 58 degrees, making it durable indoors and out. It will not melt, freeze, soften or harden. It can be thrown into a washing machine or dishwasher, and even soaked in seawater. If a user makes a mistake, a sharp knife can be used to cut through Sugru’s rubbery surface, removing it without damaging the surface of the repaired item.”

“Sales topped $5.5 million in 2015, up from $3.4 million in 2014 and $250,000 in its first year in 2010. Ms. Ni Dhulchaointigh expects sales to exceed $10 million this year and $60 million by 2020. It is now sold online to more than 160 countries and through 19 brick-and-mortar retailers in 6,050 stores in four countries. In the United States, 10 retailers carry the product in 4,500 stores.”


You Don’t Have To Be Danny Meyer …

The New York Times: “At Back Label Wine Merchants on West 20th Street in Manhattan, you won’t get very far into the handsome shop before you are greeted cheerfully and offered assistance. The sales clerk may engage you in conversation to determine your tastes and what you are seeking, or will recognize that you are browsing and don’t want a hovering presence.”

“It’s all about hospitality, of course,” said Patrick Watson, who opened Back Label in May 2014. “You don’t have to be Danny Meyer to understand how critical hospitality is to the experience.”

“Hospitality is more than a warm greeting. It’s anticipating how people shop and what information they want. At Back Label, Mr. Watson arranged the display as if following the progression of wines at a dinner party, starting with bubbly and moving through whites to reds, Old World to New World, subdivided by localities. For a more in-depth perspective, he also displays wines by characteristic — those made from grapes grown in limestone soils, say, or wines with lively acidity.”


Slower Is Better for Younger Coffee Drinkers

“Once about speed—sloshed into a paper cup and gulped on the ride to work—quick coffee now signals cheap coffee and not what customers want,” The Wall Street Journal reports. “More coffee shops are betting that a wait of four minutes or more is desirable … Coffee shops are weighing costs and revenues of slower service by evaluating employees behind the counter, longer brew times, and how that effects prices and lines.”

“Consumers in their 20s and 30s who grew up around Starbucks and coffee culture’s bolder flavors are helping drive the slower service, says Spencer Turer, vice president of Coffee Analysts, a coffee consulting firm in Burlington, Vt.” He comments: “That conversation with the barista is a key part of the experience.”

“The extra minutes also provide time for the smell and sounds of coffee which add to how consumers perceive their coffee, says Charles Spence, professor of experimental psychology at the University of Oxford, who also researches consumers’ sensory perceptions for food companies … The complex aroma and flavor of coffee comes from about 40 individual chemical compounds, he says.”

“’The sounds of grinding, dripping, spluttering, those are all meaningful,’ he says, and play a role in how the consumer perceives both the flavor and quality.”


Unbound Collection: Hyatt & The ‘Anti-Hotel’

“The Unbound Collection is a curated list of what Hyatt calls ‘stays,’ which for now means boutique hotels that are co-branded with Hyatt,” Fast Company reports. The short list includes Austin’s haunted hobnobbing space, the Driskill, and a restoration of the Hawaiian resort made famous by Elvis Presley, Coco Palms. These hotels will both advertise and operate as themselves, but they’re presented in marketing as ‘by Hyatt.’ The hotels pay a percentage of their revenue to be involved, while Hyatt offers them a customer base, a booking back end, and the sort of purchasing power a business the size of Hyatt can get.”

Maryam Banikarim, CMO at Hyatt: “What you’re seeing is the idea of travel has changed, and people want to explore and develop and have new experiences. On the flipside, they are creatures of habit—human nature wants things that are familiar.”

“For now, the ‘stays’ Hyatt is offering will take the form of boutique hotels … But in the future, the Unbound Collection will be a place where Hyatt can experiment with its own identity in the travel experience. ‘We’re not limiting ourselves just to hotels,’ Banikarim says … So while Hyatt is bullish on expanding outside of conventional hotel stays, it’s not renting out single-family homes just yet. But ‘a river cruise down the Nile?’ Banikarim suggests. That’s a distinct possibility.”


Chik-fil-A Customers Fly The Cell Phone Coop

Business Insider: “Noticing that diners often seemed more interested in their phones than their dining companions, a Chick-fil-A franchisee in Suwanee, Georgia named Brad Williams decided to take action … Williams and his team developed the Cell Phone Coop: a small box that sits on each table at his restaurant that issues a simple challenge for customers. If diners can enjoy their meals without removing their cell phones from the coop to check for calls or texts, they can let the staff know and receive a small ice cream cone.”

Says Williams: “The challenge has completely taken off. We have families who aren’t successful the first time and come back to try again. We even have people asking to take the boxes home with them!” Chik-fil-A has now “announced that more than 150 restaurants had decided to offer customers the chance to take the Cell Phone Coop challenge.”


The ‘Stereotype Effect’ Can Spark Creativity

Pacific Standard: A pair of experiments by University of Maryland researchers Denis Dumas and Kevin Dunbar find that “imagining yourself as a stereotypically creative person improves one’s performance on a standard test of creative thinking.” The ‘stereotype effect’ is a much-studied psychological phenomenon.”

“The first featured 96 undergraduates at a large American university … Approximately one-third were asked to ‘imagine that you are an eccentric poet.’ Another third were told to ‘imagine that you are a rigid librarian,’ while the final third received no stereotype-related instruction. All participants then completed the Alternative Uses Task, in which they were given the names of 10 commonplace objects … and asked to come up with as many ‘original uses’ as they could for each … Those who assumed the persona of ‘eccentric poet’ scored highest. Those who took on the role of ‘rigid librarian’ scored lowest, while participants who were not given a stereotype placed in the middle.”

“The second experiment, featuring 105 undergraduates, was similarly structured, except that each participant was asked to take on the ‘eccentric poet’ persona for five of the objects, and the ‘rigid librarian’ for the other five. The participants came up with significantly more uses when thinking of themselves as the poet, and their level of imagination was also higher under those conditions.”


Creative Block? Try Sketching a Solution

Fast Company: “Sketching is the fastest and easiest way to transform abstract ideas into concrete solutions. Once your ideas become concrete, they can be critically and fairly evaluated by the rest of your team—without any sales pitch.”

“Drawing is a great equalizer. Everyone can write words, draw boxes, and express his or her ideas with the same clarity. If you can’t draw (or rather, if you think you can’t draw), don’t freak out. Plenty of people worry about putting pen to paper, but anybody— absolutely anybody—can sketch a great solution.”

“You start with 20 minutes to ‘boot up’ by taking notes on the goals, opportunities, and inspiration you’ve collected around the room. Then you have another 20 minutes to write down rough ideas. Next, it’s time to limber up and explore alternative ideas with a rapid sketching exercise … And finally, you take 30 minutes or more to draw your solution sketch—a single well-formed concept with all the details worked out.”