When is a Car a Tiger Crossed With an Iguana?

The New York Times: “When Volkswagen developed a smallish S.U.V. to meet the segment’s growing demand, it faced a challenge: The truck had no name … VW sought the public’s input — a tricky proposition. Its unorthodox approach included a poll, which produced a stunning response. About 350,000 readers of the German magazine Auto Bild cast votes. Among the names on the ballot: Namib, Rockton, Samun and Nanuk. The winner was Tiguan, a mélange of ‘tiger’ and ‘iguana.’ Sexy? Perhaps not. But it stuck, and the Tiguan has stuck around.”

“In 2003, the Canadian division of General Motors was about to introduce a Buick model it had christened the LaCrosse. It became apparent shortly before launch that in Québécois youth culture, LaCrosse is slang for masturbation. The name was changed.”

“When it comes to signing the deal on the showroom floor, however, the car name isn’t necessarily what pushes the buyer’s buttons.” Branding consultant Robert Pyrah comments: “The product has to be king. At the end of the day, I tell clients that as long as the name isn’t bad, you can get away with most things.”

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Sam’s Club: Ardent Shoppers Feel Jilted

The New York Times: “Walmart’s quiet shuttering of 63 Sam’s Club stores on Thursday — hours after trumpeting its plans to raise wages — sent shock waves through the ardent customer base of the membership-only chain. Patrons protested with unusual passion not granted to the thousands of closings recently announced by other retailers.”

“On social media, some shoppers reminisced about sharing frozen yogurt with their great-grandmother at the local Sam’s Club, while others fretted about remote areas losing a primary source of supplies or a reliable place to pick up prescriptions.”

Bethany Pope Hopp, a mother of five, comments: “Having a store like Sam’s Club is absolutely a necessity for some of us rural, smaller communities. That and Walmart are all we have — we don’t live in an area where there’s a Costco or a Target on every corner.” Dharmendra Singh, whose Sam’s Club was among those closed, laments: “It’s like a long-term girlfriend leaving you and not even giving you a call.”

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Adidas Kicks are a Ticket to Ride

City Lab: “Starting January 16, Berlin transit authority BVG will release its own limited edition line of sneakers, a project that’s the first of its kind anywhere in the world. A collaboration with Adidas Originals, the sneakers’ tie-in with the subway will be immediately apparent to any Berliner: the heel counters feature the unmistakable seat upholstery pattern featured on the city’s public transit fleet.”

“The sneaker’s tongue will include a feature that’s arguably more striking—a fabric version of the annual BVG season ticket. That means the wearer gets free travel on subways, trams, buses, and ferries anywhere within Berlin public transit zones A and B— which cover almost all of the city—from January 31st to the end of the year.”

“Then there’s the price, which is a snip at €180 ($215) a pair. That makes them more expensive than the average sneaker, but much cheaper than a traditional annual transit pass, currently €728 ($869) for the same zones.”

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Circular Logic: Paper Fliers Beat Banners

The Wall Street Journal: “One old-school retailing trick has survived the e-commerce shakeout—the lowly advertising circular. Some grocers and other retail chains have learned they risk losing business without a steady flow of paper mailings nudging shoppers to stores. Even online startups that don’t have physical shops are embracing the idea.”

“For now, paper fliers keep piling up on doorsteps because most people still read their mail, even as they easily ignore most online banner ads and many emails.”

“The biggest retailer, however, has cut back on circulars. Wal-Mart is sending out about a dozen mailings a year, down from a hundred two years ago. The retailer has asked suppliers to spend the marketing dollars that used to go into circulars on lowering their prices and chose to send out fewer circulars, a spokeswoman said.”

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Tsukiji Fish Market: The Wall Street of Seafood

Business Insider: “The Tsukiji Fish Market is located in the Tsukiji district in central Tokyo. It is bordered by the swanky shopping district Ginza and the Sumida River … The market has become one of the top tourist attractions in Japan, but it wasn’t intended that way. It’s a place for business. Restaurant and market owners come every day to pick the choicest pieces of seafood for their business.”

“More fish passes through Tsukiji than any other market in the world. Some estimates suggest that the market does more than $4 billion in business a year … The market sells over 480 different types of seafood each day, as well as 270 different types of produce. Harvard anthropology professor Ted Bestor, who studies Japanese sushi culture, has called it ‘the nerve center of a global fishing industry’.”

“The tuna in the market is delivered from all over the world frozen or on ice less than 24 hours after being caught. Then the fishmongers have to clean and defrost the giant fish … The wholesalers then cut the tuna into sellable pieces for the top sushi restaurants in the city. Some wholesalers will even massage the fish or have conversations with it as they cut … After you’re done touring, head to any of the sushi joints in the main market for a kaisendon, or sushi-rice bowl. Unless you’ve been to 3-Michelin-starred Sukiyabashi Jiro, it will likely be the best you’ve ever had.”

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Skura: A Sponge That’s Both Smart & Beautiful


Skura Style: “With clean Scandinavian design, bold colors and resealable packaging, this sponge looks so good you’ll want to show it off … Ugly and smelly no more. Skura’s antimicrobial and fade-to-change technologies ensure that brilliant clean we all crave … Skura’s subscription service is an easy, accessible and innovative way to maintain good sponge etiquette and keep your kitchen super fresh.” (Hat tip to Bill Agee).

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Are You Smarter Than a Kohler Toilet?

The Wall Street Journal: “For some innovators, the next frontier is the room in your house most likely to have a lock on the door: the bathroom. Showcasing their goods at this year’s CES tech show, these companies acknowledge a need for privacy in that inner sanctum—then proceed to show off cameras, microphones and other sensors they’d like you to install there … consider a mirror that turns on motion-activated lights when you get up in the middle of the night, or tells you the weather in the morning. Consider setting the shower on to the perfect temperature just by asking, before you climb in. There are even ‘intelligent’ toilets in the works though how intelligent they’ll be remains to be seen.”

“Some startups see the bathroom the way others now look at the automobile: ready for an open-platform operating system of its own. CareOS—a subsidiary of a French firm which also owns connected toothbrush maker Kolibree—designed an entire health and beauty hub … While a camera in the bathroom sounds like something you’d want to cover with duct tape, CareOS chief technology officer Ali Mouizina says all of your data is stored locally. The system won’t even share it with any other smart home or media hubs in your house, unless you want it to. After all, he said, the bathroom is ‘a private place, a very special place’.”

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