Manhattan Saddlery: The Past as the Future

The New York Times: “When horseback riding was the dominant mode of transportation, equestrian shops were as common as fresh-pressed juice bars are today. East 24th Street was so populated with places to outfit and care for horses that it came to be known as Old Stable Row. Times have changed. And for the city equestrian, a rare breed in itself, the only remaining shop of its kind on Old Stable Row is Manhattan Saddlery.”

“The smell of leather permeates the sprawling two-story shop, greeting customers who arrive looking for saddles, bridles, halters, crops, stirrups and riding pants … Charlotte Kullen was shopping on a recent Saturday, as she does about once a week. At the shop she finds a receptive audience for her latest stories about Asantro, her horse. ‘It was his birthday yesterday,’ she said, displaying photos on her phone of the Dutch Warmblood, an athletic breed often used in competitions.”

Another shopper, Alex Roy, comments: “It’s funny, like any brick-and-mortar shop, if you think about it, you can buy anything they carry online … But you come here to talk to the people and to see the place.”

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FDA Re-Designs Nutritional Label

Gizmodo: “The FDA just released its first major change to its nutritional labels in over twenty years … The deadline for the change is July 26, 2018. But you should start seeing the new labels much earlier, as manufacturers start to make the switch.” The new label is on the right.

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Cadillac House: The Car as a Retail Experience

Bloomberg: “Cadillac House is a coffee shop/retail boutique with an art gallery twist and even a bespoke scent … The 12,000-square-foot space is located on the ground floor of the company’s New York office and will open to the public on June 2 … the point of this new space is not to sell cars … No, this time Caddy has convinced some well-respected fashion-y names to make it more of a destination: Visionaire, the creative firm and magazine, will curate an exhibit at Cadillac House each quarter; the fashion brand Timo Weiland will sell clothing in a pop-up shop; 12.29, which scented shows for Rodarte and Lady Gaga, is concocting a signature ‘Cadillac’ fragrance for the room. New York’s Joe Coffee is providing the beans.”

“We have tried to tell people what you’re supposed to feel from the Cadillac brand,” said Melody Lee, who is Cadillac’s brand director. “But what we hadn’t quite fully established was an environment that you could walk into.”

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The ‘New’ Applebee’s: Hand-Cut & Wood-Fired

Business Insider: Applebee’s “is installing wood fire grills in all 2,000-plus locations across the US — a $40 million investment by the chain’s franchisees. The grills will completely change much of Applebee’s menu’s meal preparation, impacting 40% of items on the menu. It’s a major change that Applebee’s hopes will allow the chain to gain culinary credibility and stand out from the vast array of casual dining restaurants across the US, which have struggled to keep up in an era dominated by fresh fast casual chains.”

“You’re going to see it and hear it,” said Julia Stewart, the chairman and CEO of Applebee’s parent company DineEquity, Inc. “You’re going to literally smell it when you’re in the parking lot, and then you’re going to walk in and see it on the menu, and then you’re going to have a food server talk about it in a very excited way.”

“Beyond the grills, the chain is adding new items like hand-cut wood-fired steaks to the menu, training employees as meat-cutters, and remodeling locations across the US. It is also launching a $120 million marketing campaign, the largest in the company’s history, with a new creative agency.”

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Lord & Taylor Is Coming Up Roses

Washington Post: Lord & Taylor “has ordered up a big roster of rose-emblazoned pieces, many of them exclusives from labels like Karl Lagerfeld Paris and Calvin Klein, that are meant to cater to the contemporary, trend-conscious shopper … In addition dresses and blouses, they’ve lined up offbeat items like rose-flavored gummy candies and rose-shaped temporary tattoos. And in some stores, the products will be featured in a shop-in-shop it calls The Birdcage.”

“It’s a major merchandising and marketing effort that executives hope will … telegraph a fresh, contemporary direction … without alienating the loyal shoppers who might fondly remember that the rose was a staple of Lord & Taylor marketing from 1946 until it was phased out over the last 20 years … The idea … to harken back to the company’s heritage … is a tactic retailers across all price points are turning to right now based on the belief that millennials will respond to this kind of storytelling.”

However, “the story of the rose may be so obscure and unfamiliar to young shoppers, it may be hard for them to even understand the collection as an ode to history and heritage.”

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The Gucci Experience Goes Up In Smoke

The New York Times: “On Java Road in Hong Kong, a new pair of brown leather Gucci loafers, lovingly wrapped in cellophane, hangs from a storefront — the deal of a lifetime at less than $3. Just not this lifetime. The shoes are paper replicas, meant to be burned as offerings to relatives who have died — a modern twist on an old Chinese custom … But the Gucci handbags and shoes that grandmother may have cooed over when she was among the living now appear to be out of her ethereal reach.”

“It seems Gucci’s zeal to protect its brand extends into the hereafter. Last week, its parent company … sent a letter to six local stores that sell the paper offerings, telling them to stop selling replicas of Gucci products because they were using its famous trademark.” However, a Hong Kong law professor “said Gucci would have a difficult time” making its case. “To successfully sue for trademark infringement … a company has to demonstrate that people confuse the cardboard replicas with real Gucci products, which is highly unlikely.”

“The shopkeepers lament what they see as the absurdity of it all. Their target market — the dead — does not appear to intersect with the well-heeled, or aspiring-to-be wealthy, living and breathing Gucci customers who frequent the outlet’s shops in Hong Kong, one of the company’s top markets. ‘Our customers are totally different,’ said one shopkeeper … ‘They burn these things to send to the spirits’ … Jing Zhang, fashion editor for The South China Morning Post, wrote: ‘The symbolism of a global, multibillion-dollar luxury company ‘warning’ perhaps some of the poorest retailers in the city over items that could not ever be taken for the real thing just seems a little bullying’.”

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Quote of the Day: Prince

“I’d rather give people what they need rather than just what they want.” – Prince Rogers Nelson (1958-2016)

It’s kind of the inverse of Mick Jagger: “You can’t always get what you want,” where what you need is something less than what you want. Prince (and David Bowie for that matter — and the Stones to be fair!), understood that what we need is something more than what we want.

Isn’t this also true of great brands? They take us somewhere beyond what we want. The magic is in what we need, whether we know we “want” it or not — until we experience it.

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Readers vs. Users: A Cure for the Common Algorithm

Quartz: “To be sure, there’s a sick kind of symbiosis involved in so-called metrics-driven journalism. Content farms produce what the metrics say users want, and users give their attention, against which content creators can sell ads … And so it’s no surprise that when publications treat readers as users, they find what they expect to see: vapid, venal, flaky masses who constitute a collective problem to be solved by the data wizards of Silicon Valley.”

“But readers aren’t the problem. Readers are the solution. If publications can reclaim the reciprocal relationship between themselves and the people for whom they tell stories, then they can nurture a different kind of growth. It would not be the fast, social media-driven pageview growth that we see from venture capital-backed media upstarts. It would not be wide growth. Rather, it would be deep growth: fewer users but more loyalty and impact.”

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Fake Farms Fool Tesco Shoppers

The Wall Street Journal: UK grocery chain Tesco is launching “76 new food lines,” branded with the names of “seven fictitious farms. Critics say the British-sounding monikers obscure the fact that the products come from a variety of farms, including ones overseas. Blueberries under the Rosedene Farms brand come from Spain, for example, while apples under the same brand hail from South Africa.”

“The British efforts are part of a global trend among supermarket chains and food makers as customers increasingly seek food that appears fresh, lacks artificial ingredients and is locally sourced.” Says Tesco CEO Dave Lewis: “We’ve been very open about the fact that this is creation—we’re creating and launching these brands.”

“Not all of British retail’s farms are fictional. High-end supermarket chain Waitrose on Friday began streaming live footage in train stations across the country from a farm it owns in Hampshire. Passersby will be greeted with footage of beehives, rapeseed and more from dawn to dusk.” Waitrose “said it aimed to let customers see firsthand where their food comes from. ‘Rather than telling customers what we do, we’ve decided to show them in an open and honest way,’ said Rupert Thomas, Waitrose’s marketing director.”

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Humbug: The Truth & Other Lies

The New York Times: When P.T. Barnum, the great 19th-century impresario of public entertainment (and co-founder of the Barnum & Bailey Circus) popularized that word — ‘humbug’ — he was talking exactly about things like Sea-Monkeys. Most assume … that the word is synonymous with total nonsense and absolute fraud.”

“But that overgeneralization misses Barnum’s sly nuance. ‘Humbug’ is not a lie, the great promoter used to say: ‘No humbug is great without truth at bottom.’ It’s unfair to say that Barnum peddled pure fantasy. Great humbug simply took off from a small truth and used that to show people what they wanted to see. In his own way, P.T. Barnum was the greatest cognitive scientist of the 19th century. He understood that when you pit humbug against harsh cold reality, reality doesn’t stand a chance.”

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