Micromerch: Statements for Daily Life

The New York Times: Here comes micromerch:”personal merchandise for niche public figures and celebrities (or even not-yet celebrities) made possible by innovations in manufacturing and distribution, and with mechanisms greased by the ease of the internet. Consider it the modern-day equivalent of the private-press LP or the small-batch zine, amplified for social media and very late capitalism … small-batch merch — a couple dozen to a couple thousand items — can be made available for almost anyone, from emergent social media or reality TV demicelebrities to casual dadaists who toy with the dissemination of ideas in the modern marketplace. In an era when personal branding is presumed, no following is too small to monetize.”

“Want to show support for Sean Bryan, a.k.a. the Papal Ninja, an American Ninja Warrior contestant and lay minister? There’s a shirt (and laptop case) for that. Enthralled by the 1980s sunglasses worn by the rubber-legged teen social media star Roy Purdy in his absurdist dance videos? For a while, he sold them, too. Obsessed with Gordie, the French bulldog owned by Alex Tumay, who engineers Young Thug’s records? Buy a shirt.”

“Peloton, the home indoor cycling business, has a stable of a dozen instructors, and sells merch inspired by each. Jill Foley, Peloton’s director of boutique apparel, said the company has sold hundreds of T-shirts and tank tops with instructor catchphrases like ‘It’s Not That Deep’ (Cody Rigsby) and ‘Sweat Sing Repeat’ (Jenn Sherman).” She comments: “We’re getting messages to people in this micro way. We’re in people’s homes in their daily life.”

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Branding The Brandless Brand

Business Insider: Brandless, “which sells food and consumable essentials all for $3 and pitched itself as the “Procter & Gamble for millennials,” first launched in July … The brand is now moving into the physical world with a pop-launching in May, called ‘Popup with a Purpose.’ It will be a ‘three-dimensional experience of the values of what Brandless is really about,’ according to CEO and co-founder Tina Sharkey. The Brandless brand will be on display, but no products will be for sale. Instead, the 3,500 square foot location on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles will be offering samples, and opportunities to “live, learn, and love with intention,” according to a press release.”

“The pop-up will be interactive and there will be panels, workshops, and talks by experts in the fields associated with the areas of food and wellness that Brandless has staked out. Along with the pop-up, Brandless is also launching a lifestyle blog that will be focused on educating consumers of the claimed benefits of, for example, ‘tree-free toilet paper’.”

“Sharkey sees Brandless as filling gaps where the ease of shipping and low point of entry can allow people to try new things — like gluten-free baking mix — that would otherwise be either too expensive or just hard to find locally in some areas … The B.more membership program, which previously only lowered the free shipping order threshold to $48 dollars, now makes all orders ship free. The company has since started focusing on offering B.more to repeat Brandless customers.”

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Short Edition: The Literary Vending Macine

The New York Times: “Short Edition, a French community publisher of short-form literature, has installed more than 30 story dispensers in the United States in the past year to deliver fiction at the push of a button at restaurants and universities, government offices and transportation hubs. Francis Ford Coppola, the film director and winemaker, liked the idea so much that he invested in the company and placed a dispenser at his Cafe Zoetrope in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco. Last month public libraries in four cities — Philadelphia; Akron, Ohio; Wichita, Kan.; and Columbia, S.C. — announced they would be installing them too. There is one on the campus at Penn State. A few can be found in downtown West Palm Beach, Fla. And Short Edition plans to announce more, including at Los Angeles International Airport.”

“Here’s how a dispenser works: It is shaped like a cylinder with three buttons on top indicating a “one minute,” “three minute” or “five minute” story. (That’s how long it takes to read.) When a button is pushed, a short story is printed, unfurled on a long strip of paper. The stories are free. They are retrieved from a computer catalog of more than 100,000 original submissions by writers whose work has been evaluated by Short Edition’s judges, and transmitted over a mobile network. Offerings can be tailored to specific interests: children’s fiction, romance, even holiday-themed tales.”

“Short Edition, which is based in Grenoble and was founded by publishing executives, set up its first kiosk in 2016 and has 150 machines worldwide … The dispensers cost $9,200 plus an additional $190 per month for content and software. The only thing that needs to be replaced is paper. The printed stories have a double life, shared an average of 2.1 times.” Kristan Leroy of Short Edition comments: “The idea is to make people happy. There is too much doom and gloom today.”

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Dept. of Social: Community Shopping

The Wall Street Journal: “Going to a department store might seem like simply shopping, but it’s also a chance to practice civil behavior, to appreciate beautiful things, to feel a connection to others. In the 1970s, Bloomingdale’s was considered a New York City attraction on par with the Metropolitan Museum of Art, which, according to Robert Hendrickson, author of ‘The Grand Emporiums,’ was Bloomie’s only real competition when it came to meeting a possible romantic partner.”

“Last spring, inspired by memories of the excitement of shopping in New York in the 1980s, Bergdorf Goodman’s fashion director Linda Fargo opened Linda’s at BG, an in-store boutique stocked with her personal picks in everything from high heels to Squirrel nuts. ‘Online is efficient,’ Ms. Fargo said, ‘but nothing can replace touching things, looking in people’s faces. Sensuality—that’s what we can offer people’ … Nordstrom executives appeared to be thinking along similar lines in 2013 when they hired Olivia Kim, formerly of New York-based Opening Ceremony, to make the store more relevant to younger customers.”

“As Nordstrom’s vice president of creative projects, Ms. Kim has initiated a series of pop-up boutiques and brought in buzzy, Instagram-friendly designers like Marine Serre and Jacquemus. But her proudest achievement, she said, is seeing Nordstrom used as a hangout space by customers: ‘Not everything needs to be transactional. I’m more interested in that they’ve learned something, that they feel energized and excited’ … As Harry Gordon Selfridge, founder of Selfridges, once said, ‘a store should be a social center.’ Department stores are taking note.”

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We Never Close: 24/7 Adventures

The Wall Street Journal: “Apparently short of actual adventures, teens and 20-somethings are sneaking into chain stores and restaurants, including McDonald’s, Walmart , Chuck E. Cheese’s and IKEA, staying all night and posting videos online as evidence. A YouTube search for 24-hour overnight challenges turns up 1.6 million results. A closer examination of the phenomenon reveals something thrill-seekers didn’t expect—spending extended periods inside an empty chain store can be really, really dull.”

“The craze appears to go back to 2016, when Belgian youngsters hid inside an IKEA after it closed and then posted the video online. The fad soon spread to the U.K., where a boy slept overnight in an IKEA furniture store, worrying his family, who didn’t know where he was … Indiana college student Christian Perry said he was determined to finish the challenge at a Walmart Supercenter, however dull things got. Last May, he and a friend decided to spend a full 48 hours in one of the stores in Indianapolis. The Walmart is open around the clock. The pair needed a secret place to slumber and a way to stay sane.”

“Just minutes into the outing, Mr. Perry, who is 21 and studying computer science, realized he couldn’t bear Walmart’s music and needed a distraction. ‘I started reading labels after that,’ he said … The 13-minute video the friends posted on YouTube shows highlights of their itinerary. They looked at fish in the aquarium section. They read magazines, played games at the arcade and dribbled balls in the sports aisle … After hunkering down in the toilet-paper section the second night, the duo quietly slipped home. ‘It was one of the worst experiences of my life,’ Mr. Perry said.”

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Is there a cure for curation?

Wilfred M. McClay: “‘Curation’ lends to the proceedings a certain air of quasi-professionalism. It seeks to claim for the proprietors an exquisitely refined faculty of discrimination, a sense that ‘objective’ higher standards are being enacted and adhered to. The selection that has been made, we are being assured, was not a product of whim or fancy, let alone crass commercialism … as the word’s allusion to museums and museum work subtly suggests, the use of ‘curate’ carries overtones of social climbing, of seeking to associate oneself with the ‘better sort’ of people—tasteful, knowledgeable, attractive, suave, well-to-do.”

“The word derives from the Latin curare, to take care, and has in its historical ancestry the notion of a “curate” as one who is charged with the care of souls … Perhaps in some instances, such as that of the independent bookstore, it can even be said that the “thoughtful curation” of the inventory reflects an attentiveness to the needs of the soul.”

“But the word ‘curate’ itself may be too corrupted by misuse to be able to carry such larger meanings much longer … It is now commonplace to speak of ‘social curation,’ which means something akin to ‘the wisdom of the crowd,’ the belief that the most meaningful way of sorting through and selecting and organizing masses of data is by the aggregation of the opinions and tastes of millions of completely independent individuals. There is a good deal to be said for this view, but the process it describes is the very opposite of curation itself, a word that, if it is to mean anything at all, means the application of a conscious sensibility and organizing intelligence.”

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Giddyap: Aldi Offers Equestrian Experience

The Daily Mail: “Aldi is now offering discounted horse riding lessons to its customers – in a bid to encourage more people to get into the sport. The budget retailer has become the first supermarket chain in the country to offer riding lessons, after teaming up with two prestigious riding schools to offer sessions.”

“The lessons, which can be bought online, will be available at the Summerhouse Equestrian in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, and Parbold Equestrian near Wigan, Lancashire, with prices starting from £21 (US $30). The supermarket has also unveiled its new equestrian range – meaning you can now get riding tops, jodhpurs, boots and special socks from your local store. Those who buy their riding lessons from Aldi will save 30 per cent off the regular price.”

“Aldi’s joint managing director for corporate buying, Julie Ashfield, comments: “We believe that cost should never lead to compromise. Our competitively priced equestrian clothing ranges have proven extremely popular in the past, and this year, we want to go one gallop further in making horse riding more accessible for all. By offering discounted horse riding lessons for all the family, we hope that parents across the UK will be able to introduce their children to the sport, or have a go themselves.”

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Fonts of Success: How Typeface Builds Brands

The New York Times: “When ads for the Netflix show ‘Stranger Things’ first appeared in 2016, the glowing, blood-red, unevenly shaded font that spelled out the title told viewers exactly what they could expect. The retro typeface — and a haunting, one-minute title video — became synonymous with the supernatural thriller series and, as the show gained in popularity, memes centered largely around its instantly recognizable title have become plentiful … Hollywood has long known this marketing trick, with movie studios strategically choosing fonts, colors and lighting for a film title that will reflect its tone and genre.”

“When Southwest Airlines revamped its brand in 2014, it overhauled its font and logo as part of the upgrade. It wanted to create the image of an airline that cared about customer loyalty — one that had heart. So, Southwest changed its all-caps Helvetica font to a thicker, custom-made Southwest Sans font that included lowercase letters — changes meant to convey a softer, friendlier tone.” Southwest communications director Helen Limpitlaw comments: “We’ve definitely seen an increase in revenue, an increase in bookings and brand momentum.”

“In 2002, Monster Beverage rolled out its Monster Energy drink logo, which featured three neon-green claw-marks in the shape of an ‘M’ on a black background, with ‘Monster’ in white Gothic-like lettering under it. The eye-catching logo and colors exuded energy and youth and connected with fans of sports like snowboarding and Formula One racing, who were its target customers … Now, 16 years later, Monster’s logo remains valuable and recognizable.”

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Barley Independent: Beer is Certifiably Craft

Robert Glennon: “When the dust settled from various mergers, two conglomerates, Molson Coors and AB InBev, controlled 90% of U.S. beer production. They’ve been buying up craft breweries, including Blue Moon, Karbach, Wicked Weed and Goose Island. Last year Heineken acquired Lagunitas. Are the acquired brands still craft brewers?”

“Lurking beneath the legal technicalities lies a critical issue for craft brewers: access to shelf space and beer taps. It’s a big challenge given the structure of the beer industry. After the repeal of Prohibition in 1933, Congress and most state legislatures implemented a three-tier system of producers, distributors and retailers. Most producers must retain the services of a distributor. For some craft brewers, that’s a major problem. Most distributors are aligned with one of the two conglomerates, which exert leverage on distributors to favor their brands.”

“At one level, the question is whether drinkers care whether their beer comes from a small, independent brewery … The answer may become clearer. In June 2017, the Brewers Association launched a seal to be put on bottles or cans, labeling the product as ‘Brewers Association Certified Independent Craft’. As of Feb. 26, 3,033 craft brewers out of 5,546 nationwide pledged to use the seals. Consumers may end up voting with their wallets in a referendum on the importance of sustaining small, independent craft brewers.”

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Retail Politics: Is Fast Fashion Tone Deaf?

The New York Times: “Every once in a while, tucked into the stream of speedily made garments rushed into stores, designs with shockingly bad taste stand out: a shirt comparing women to dogs at Topman, symbols of the Holocaust on a top at Zara … Retail experts blame a heated competitive environment, where companies, many of them based in Europe, are spread thin trying to cater to a global customer base that is easily bored, is extremely demanding and can buy almost anything via e-commerce. Many brands develop a cavalier attitude: Churn out products now, ask forgiveness later.”

“Earlier this year, H&M, one of the largest clothing retailers in the world … was taken to task over a children’s hoodie emblazoned with the phrase ‘coolest monkey in the jungle’ and modeled in marketing materials by a young black boy. The description, which has been used to dehumanize black people, set off protests at South African stores that left mannequins toppled and racks overturned. In the aftermath, H&M chose a lawyer and company insider, Annie Wu, to lead a new four-person team at its Stockholm headquarters focused on global diversity and inclusiveness.” She comments: “We didn’t recognize that in this now new age of transparency, what the brand stands for is super important to people.”

“Fast fashion companies, which specialize in low-priced, quickly produced clothing and have grown faster than the apparel industry as a whole for years, are under pressure to be more prolific and provocative as they sell across more borders. H&M, which added 479 stores last year, now has more than 4,000 stores in dozens of countries … retail experts said that much of the creative process takes place in and around its European home office, far from many of its markets … Fast fashion has produced tone-deaf products for years, passing them off as a rounding error given the enormous volume of items the companies generate each year … Several companies have pledged to diversify hiring, retool corporate guidelines and initiate other measures to prevent mistakes from going out the door.”

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