Theater as Retail: El Ateneo Grand Splendid

Boredpanda: “Tucked away in Barrio Norte, Buenos Aires is a beautiful bookshop called El Ateneo Grand Splendid … which currently welcomes over one million visitors each year … It is built within the almost 100-year-old Grand Splendid Theater, which opened in 1919.”

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The Strand: A Culture of Quizzes

The New York Times: “The Strand is the undisputed king of the city’s independent bookstores, a giant in an ever-shrinking field … The Strand employees are known for being ‘curmudgeonly’ but also clever, even cool: Former employees include Patti Smith … For about four decades, however, applicants have confronted a final hurdle to enter its ranks: the literary matching quiz.”

“Over time, the reputation of the Strand’s quiz has grown … The legend has become larger, in fact, than the quiz itself, which is only 10 lines long, covering a few inches of the photocopied application … Fred Bass, who with his daughter, Nancy Bass Wyden, owns the Strand, called the quiz ‘a very good way to find good employees,’ regardless of their duties.”

Carson Moss of The Strand says the quiz is not a make or break for applicants: “In a sense we feel it’s a reward for passionate readers, after they’ve slogged through an application,” he said. The Strand’s Constance Fox comments: “What I find most interesting is when people don’t answer, but then write: ‘I’m an artist. I know all about Picasso,’ or ‘Here’s what I know about children’s books.’”

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Cadillac House: Not Your Father’s Dealership

The Verge: “The next stage in transforming Cadillac is to bring its 925 dealers up to snuff. That’s where the Cadillac House comes into play, a chic public space where anyone can drop by and steep in the brand’s past, present, and future. Each detail of the facility has been carefully considered — it sells Joe Coffee (a local favorite), offers free Wi-Fi, stages art installations … it hosted a block party bash featuring a short set by My Morning Jacket. The Cadillac House has a few cars on view, but it’s not a car dealership. Discreet product specialists are trained to answer questions about features on new models like the CT6.”

Cadillac president Johan de Nysschen comments: “Our office, the Cadillac House, this is what our dealer experience should be like. Our focus here must be on increasing the overall quality of the business. It must be about increasing transaction prices. It must be about brand positioning and upgrading quality of the dealer and doing so in a way that we continue to build the relationship between Cadillac the manufacturer and our dealer network. We have to navigate a very difficult path.”

He adds: “It’s really those small dealers that we want to turn into powerhouses. We want to create a boutique experience, separate from the rest of the GM brand, and we want to help our dealers.”

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50 Ways to Kill ‘Pokémon Go’

The Wall Street Journal: “Already some local businesses lucky enough to be near a key location have latched on to Pokémon Go … one New York pizzeria manager who dropped a ‘lure’ in the game for $10 to attract trainers to its proximity—and business spiked 75%. A Brooklyn bar noted that the Pokémon inside were for paying customers only … ‘sponsored locations,’ where companies would pay to become locations in the virtual world in order to drive foot traffic, will be coming to the game.”

“For example, a brand could pay for Wi-Fi at a popular Pokémon location. Or hand out samples … Or put up real world signs or video screens touting their message.”

“Dario Raciti, U.S. director of Zero Code, the gaming and virtual reality division of OMD … noted that one of the worst things the creators of the app could do would be to overload the game with ads, turning every Pokémon adventure into a walk through the virtual version of a billboard-filled Times Square.”

Meanwhile: “Gizmodo has learned that … every McDonald’s restaurant in this country will either be a PokéStop or a gym.”

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Supermarket Bars: Drinking & Shopping

The Wall Street Journal: “Some high-end supermarkets are serving alcohol. Many have set aside space for wine bars and beer gardens where they host tasting events, with drinks and appetizers. Some stores encourage shoppers to ‘sip ’n’ shop,’ drinking while pushing a shopping cart for a more relaxed shopping experience.”

“At nearly 350 Whole Foods locations nationwide, shoppers can carry open beverages out of the bar area and around the store as they shop around. Some stores have added cup holders to their shopping carts or placed racks around the store where shoppers can place empty stemless wine glasses. In some Texas locations, the $1 cans of beer rest in ice-filled buckets labeled ‘walkin’ around beer’.”

“Shoppers perceive drinks at supermarkets to be a better value than drinks in a traditional bar or club … Bars stretch out the time shoppers, especially 20-somethings, spend in the store. That helps new shoppers get to know the store, even if they had planned to make just a quick stop.”

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The Mall Experience: Armed & Dangerous?

“Amid a wave of gun violence in public venues across the U.S. and around the world, mall shoppers are paying more attention to safety,” The Wall Street Journal reports. “Some said they want to see more guard patrols or signs at shopping centers warning of random bag checks. Others suggested mall security officers be armed.”

“The spate of shootings in public areas in recent months has put the issue of security squarely on the minds of both consumers and landlords, who now must balance the need for safety with the need to create pleasant environments for their customers.”

“Shopping centers are more vulnerable than other public areas like transport hubs because they have multiple exits and people often carry large parcels. It can be difficult for private property owners to balance visible and intrusive security while looking to attract customers to shop, relax and be entertained.”

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Sonos Builds a ‘Wall of Sound’

Engadget: “The new Sonos store in NYC “features seven listening rooms designed to let consumers experience Sonos products firsthand. But the most outstanding decor is … known as The Wall of Sound. It’s a 17-by-24-foot installation made up of roughly 300 Sonos speakers, of which eight are plugged in and active.”

“The store is intended to provide a home feel. For example, each listening room is laid out differently, giving you the sense you’re sitting in a study room, home theater or kitchen as you jam out to a Play:1, Play:3, Play:5 and Playbar.”

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When Labels Say … They Really Mean …

The Wall Street Journal: “Government regulators forbid ouright dishonesty, but labels with narrowly defined, cleverly deployed or unregulated buzzwords can confound shoppers trying to figure out what’s what.” For example: “‘Made with’ often means ‘made with very little,’” said Bonnie Liebman, director of nutrition at the Center for Science in the Public Interest. “Many consumers assume it means made only of whole grain. That’s simply not true.”

“Cage-free: Most egg-laying hens in the U.S. are confined in small, wire cages that measure 67 to 86 square inches per hen … Cage-free birds, on the other hand, are allowed to roam in a room or open area—but they are not guaranteed access to the outdoors. Free range: These chickens … do have outdoor access, although producers may provide minimal outdoor space or use screened-in porches with floors made of concrete, dirt or grass to provide the access.”

“Hormones aren’t allowed in poultry or hogs … Nonetheless, some producers label those products ‘no hormones added’ … Natural: This refers to the preparation of a product, not how a plant or animal was raised, and the label is supposed to include a statement explaining what it means … ‘Free’ means there is less than 0.5 gram per serving of a nutrient that has a daily value … ‘Low’ means there are 3 grams or less per serving … And ‘reduced’ means there is at least 25% less of the nutrient compared with another food.”

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C.O. Bigelow: Retail Magic Since 1838

The New York Times: “At a time when chain drugstores are seemingly colonizing every block of New York City, the family-owned C.O. Bigelow, on the Avenue of the Americas between West Eighth and Ninth Streets, has managed not only to survive but to flourish.”

“The store was opened in 1838 by Dr. Galen Hunter as the Village Apothecary Shop at 102 Sixth Avenue, and he eventually sold it to an employee, Clarence Otis Bigelow, in 1880. Mr. Bigelow moved it two doors north, to the current location in 1902, where the original brass finishes, including the gas chandeliers, are still intact.”

“If you count the original store … C.O. Bigelow claims it is the oldest pharmacy in the United States. It has had a devoted following for much of its existence, and was said to be favored by Mark Twain, Thomas Edison and Eleanor Roosevelt. Today, with an inventory of nearly 500 beauty brands, both mainstream and boutique, it is a destination for beauty-product junkies.”

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Small Rivals Trip Big Brands

The Economist: “For a time, size gave CPG companies a staggering advantage. Centralising decisions and consolidating manufacturing helped firms expand margins. Deep pockets meant companies could spend millions on a flashy television advertisement, then see sales rise. Firms distributed goods to a vast network of stores, paying for prominent placement on shelves.”

“Yet these advantages are not what they once were. Consolidating factories has made companies more vulnerable to the swing of a particular currency … The impact of television adverts is fading … At the same time, barriers to entry are falling for small firms … Distribution is getting easier, too: a young brand may prove itself with online sales, then move into big stores.”

“Most troublesome, the lumbering giants are finding it hard to keep up with fast-changing consumer markets … As their economies grew, local players often proved more attuned to shoppers’ needs. In America and Europe” shoppers “can choose from cheap, store-brand goods … But if a customer wants to pay more for a product, it may not be for a traditional big brand. This may be because shoppers trust little brands more than established ones.”

“EY, a consultancy, recently surveyed CPG executives. Eight in ten doubted their company could adapt to customer demand.”

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