Slow Lanes: Better Pace for Older Shoppers

Quartz: “The researchers in food and public policy from the University of Hertfordshire suggested that supermarkets should introduce ‘slow lanes’ for the elderly, for whom shopping for food is part of a social experience that new technology is eroding … Automated check-outs and efficient service ignore a vital community aspect of food shopping, and not just in the UK but across developed economies, the researcher (Wendy Wills) said.”

“Older people want to remain active but can feel intimidated because they ‘know they’re really slow,’ she said. ‘And they want staff that are going to spend time talking to them…spending some time rather than rushing them.’ Similarly, said Wills, the idea that online food-shopping is a way to help older, less mobile people ignores the need for people to come together.”

“And it seems the ‘slow lanes’ idea could actually catch on, as supermarkets begin to take responsibility for their place in the architecture of local communities. Wills said several local trials had already taken place, and more than one large British supermarket chain had expressed interest in working with the university as it continues with the research.”

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How Best Buy Beat Back Amazon

The Wall Street Journal: “Against all odds, Chief Executive Hubert Joly … managed to turn Best Buy around. As Amazon moves more deeply into new areas such as apparel and food, fellow retailers would be well served to note its example. The first step was aimed at preventing showroomers from buying elsewhere. The company committed to matching competitors’ prices and brought its prices in line with Amazon’s. At the same time, Best Buy improved its website and mobile app.”

“Best Buy also began to use its stores to improve its e-commerce operations. Prior to Mr. Joly’s arrival, if a product wasn’t in one of the company’s six warehouses, it would be listed as out of stock, even if the item was in stores. Now Best Buy’s stores do double duty as e-commerce warehouses. Best Buy says half of online orders are now picked up in store or shipped from a store, and 70% of Americans live within 15 minutes of a store. That has helped Best Buy speed up shipping times so that most online purchases arrive in two days, matching Amazon Prime’s speeds without the annual fee.”

In addition: “The retailer knew its suppliers wanted it to thrive, particularly as a showroom for their higher-end products. The company asked vendors … to set up their own branded shops. The suppliers footed the bill for most of this, and many began paying for specially trained staffers to work in them. Best Buy also improved training for its other workers and added high-end kitchen and bath offerings from Pacific Kitchen & Home and high-end home theater equipment from Magnolia. Best Buy got more than 88% of its $36.3 billion in U.S. sales in its stores in the fiscal year ended January.”

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Neiman Marcus Rents a Runway

The Wall Street Journal: “In a strategy that sounds counterintuitive but is a push to bring in younger shoppers, Neiman Marcus has invited the rent-a-dress company Rent the Runway to open locations within its stores … Neiman Marcus hopes that Rent the Runway, which is popular among 20-something shoppers, will serve as bait for a generation that hasn’t taken to department-store shopping the way their moms did … Neiman Marcus executives are also looking forward to collecting shopping data to study how these young dress renters spend in other areas of the stores.”

“The partnership will enable Rent the Runway members to try on clothes in Neiman Marcus stores. Customers will also be able to rent online from Rent the Runway and pick up or return the clothes to a Neiman Marcus … Neiman Marcus executives hope that over time, those 20- and 30-something shoppers will return to buy again and again, becoming the next generation of Neiman Marcus customers.”

“Rent the Runway’s 3,000-foot boutique within the store will have a mix of rentable clothes and Neiman Marcus shoes, bags, jewelry and other items, including underpinnings like bras and Spanx. Stylists employed by Rent the Runway will work with shoppers to assemble outfits, working with sales associates from the department store when needed. There is a cosmetics counter where shoppers can get their makeup done.”

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Adidas Biofabric: A Shoe That Melts in Your Sink

Wired: “The Adidas Futurecraft Biofabric, a biodegradable running shoe, debuted at last week’s Biofabricate conference in New York … the Futurecraft Biofabric looks a lot like a modern athletic shoe. The open-knit upper has a golden sheen, and it connects to Adidas’s trademark Boost sole … the shoe is 15 percent lighter than one made from traditional polymers, and credits its weight-savings … a synthetic spider silk it calls Biosteel.”

“AMSilk creates that Biosteel textile by fermenting genetically modified bacteria.That process creates a powder substrate, which AMSilk then spins into its Biosteel yarn. All of this happens in a lab, and … uses a fraction of the electricity and fossil fuels that plastics take to produce … AMSilk also created an enzyme solution that lets shoe owners dissolve their kicks at home, in the sink, after about two years of high-impact wear … the solution comes in little packets … and can safely disintegrate a pair of Futurecraft Biofabric shoes in a matter of hours.”

“Biodegradability both defines the shoe’s appeal and presents its biggest obstacle … High performance sportswear has certainly trended slimmer and lighter … But a shoe that’s designed to disintegrate?” James Carnes of Adidas thinks it’s on trend: “Most people don’t think about buying a product that’s intended to break down. Luxury absolutely used to mean heavy and stiff and solid, and slowly it’s changed into buying other things. Like if you buy a down jacket, it’s expected to be insulated and lightweight.”

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Dad Shoes: Hot But Not Cool

Business Insider: “The Air Monarch is by all accounts a boring shoe, meant neither to inspire nor offend. This makes it stand out in terms of the other shoes on the usual lists of bestsellers … But the shoe’s mundane design could be precisely what attracts both older customers seeking something comfortable and acceptable, as well as some younger consumers looking to subvert trend-obsessed fashion attitudes.”

“Adidas’ Stan Smiths, similarly, have been flying off the shelves for years now. The shoe is distinctive enough that designers, models, and moguls want to be seen with them on their feet, but they’re not so outlandish and colorful that the average person would be wary of buying and wearing them. And indeed they do buy them, as the shoe has sold an estimated 40 million pairs since 1973.”

“Then take NBA MVP Steph Curry’s partnership with Under Armour. The ‘Che'” Curry Two Low was torn apart on Twitter after its debut because of its ‘boring’ appearance. But the shoes ended up performing very well, selling out in two days even though the shoes are not on limited offer like many of the collaborations that have star power behind them … The flashier shoes are designed to create a halo effect, enshrining the brands in a holy glow that makes it feel trendy and cool … but it’s the consistent and reliable success of dad-approved shoes like the Air Monarch, Stan Smith, and Chef Curry Two Low that are helping to make these brands real money.”

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Prices & The Dark Side of Digital Commerce

The Wall Street Journal: “In Virtual Competition, Ariel Ezrachi and Maurice E. Stucke, two legal scholars, make a convincing argument that there can be a darker side to the growth of digital commerce. The replacement of the invisible hand of competition by the digitized hand of internet commerce can give rise to anticompetitive behavior that the competition authorities are ill equipped to deal with. The authors observe that it is possible for digital sellers to collude and fix prices just as we have seen in the non-digital environment.”

“Longstanding laws, it is true, can prevent online sellers from giving specific directions to join cartels and fix prices. But the situation gets murky when the computer algorithms of sellers are designed to learn what others are charging and to change prices in response. Will computers learn to collude? Can the use of artificial intelligence allow computer self-learning to produce the same results as tacit collusion and actually raise prices?”

“Messrs. Ezrachi and Stucke also examine how online sellers, by using technology to gather far more detailed information about their potential customers than was previously possible, can engage in ‘almost perfect’ behavioral price discrimination … suggesting that internet sellers can charge different prices to different consumers—the price discrimination determined by an estimate of how much the customer is willing to pay. Two-thirds of online shoppers, for example, abandon their carts after initial click-through. Sellers might then determine that such buyers are more price sensitive and can be induced to finalize their purchases if offered discounts or other inducements.”

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Is Slower Better? The Joy of Waiting

Dan Ariely: “Many businesses are trying to deliver their wares more quickly, but it isn’t always a good idea. When we want something, we usually think that faster is better and now is ideal … the retailer is basically forcing everyone to pay for faster shipping (the list price of your goods will necessarily include the cost of faster shipping) and forgo the joy of waiting. Neither is ideal, especially if your purchase happens to be an exciting treat rather than a dreary necessity.”

“Many online retailers would do better to help their consumers savor the anticipation rather than deliver so quickly that we lose some of the fun of our purchase.”

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The Art of Retail: A New Media Canvas

The New York Times: “Art is playing a larger role in stores, as retailers do whatever they can to make shopping in person fun, inspiring and worth the time.” Peter Marino, a retail architect, comments: “Shopping can be stressful but the art uplifts and makes you smile. And when people go back to the hotel, it’s the art they discuss and remember.”

“The focus on art is part of the change in retail and the continuing move to digital transactions. ‘The product isn’t enough now, it’s the experience,’ said Rob Ronen, an owner of Material Good, a watch and jewelry store in SoHo … ‘Because if the shop is just about the product people go online’ … The jeweler Stephen Webster opened a store in London’s Mayfair neighborhood in May that has opposite the door a taxidermied swan in full flight, with wings outstretched, greeting his visitors.” He explains: “People ask questions about the swan, and it focuses people more on what is in store.”

“Art historically has a strong track record drawing people into stores. Take the Paris department store Bon Marché, which became the fashionable place to be in 1875 when it opened an art gallery … Carla Sozzani, founder of Milan’s 10 Corso Como concept store, which has blended fashion, design and books with art for 25 years, believes that displaying art slows the way people shop.” She comments: “Even the way people purchase changes because they think more about what they are buying so they buy things they really want, which creates a faithful clientele.”

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The Landweb: Saks Deconstructs & Reinvents

The New York Times: At Saks Fifth Avenue Downtown … product displays are inspired by websites that encourage shoppers to browse. Where traditional department stores keep handbags separate from clothing … an edited range of goods is organized by designer label, with handbags, ready-to-wear and jewelry commingling on a circular path intended to inspire surprise finds.

Saks President Marc Metrick comments: “We wanted to de-compartmentalize the department store. That’s not how she shops anymore … we lay things down flat on tables, just like you’d see on a website.”

Saks also “has rolled out applications from the retail technology company Salesfloor that enable online visitors to live-chat with a sales associate at a nearby physical store. After browsing product suggestions online, shoppers can make an appointment to meet their sales associates in person, to continue shopping. And even after the in-person visit, the shopper can follow up with the very same sales associate again, online.”

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Toblerone’s ‘Treasonous’ Triangle

The New York Times: “The maker of Toblerone, the Swiss chocolate bar, has reconfigured the unique appearance of two of its milk-chocolate versions, with narrower triangles and a larger gap between peaks … the changes to the smaller one … were so pronounced that Toblerone’s Facebook page was filled with outrage from aggrieved consumers, even though only a relatively small number were likely to be affected.”

“The change, which was announced on the Toblerone Facebook page last month, is in keeping with a common strategy for companies trying to avoid price increases by reducing the contents of a product without changing the packaging. Most consumers are unaware of the changes because the product usually looks and is priced the same — there is simply less of it — but the newer, gappier Toblerone bar felt treasonous to the brand’s loyal consumers.”

“The triangular milk chocolate bar, sold in a yellow package with red letters, has been around since 1908. The founder, Theodor Tobler, combined his family name with ‘torrone,’ the Italian word for nougat, and patented his recipe of chocolate mixed with milk and honey … Mondelez International noted that while the overall look of the bar is different, the recipe remains the same and the chocolate is still made in Switzerland.”

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