Curated Retail: The Museum Gift-Shop Experience

The Washington Post: “In the vast Heritage Hall of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, employees are shelving funky sculptural dolls whose hair has been twisted and seams have been finished by local artist Francine Haskins … The museum’s retail operation is an excellent example of how the once-cheesy, forgettable gift shop has become a formidable institution-within-an-institution.”

“Once, books and exhibition catalogues were the lifeblood of museum shops. These days, most stores aim to balance academic tomes with splurge-y tchotchkes and pieces inspired by the curators’ carefully cultivated collections … ‘I tell our curators that just as you curate the museum, we curate the store,’ says Stuart Hata, president of the board of the Museum Store Association. ‘We’re not a gift shop, we’re not a bookstore,’ he says. ‘Our mission is to reflect the institution. It’s to reflect our collections’.”

“The new African American Museum will feature a host of specialty items made expressly for its shop. Blingy gold keychains, magnets, cuff links and brooches have been designed to subtly echo the venue’s latticework corona … And then there are those specially selected objects made by artists from across the country.” Ed Howell, the Smithsonian Institution’s senior vice president of retail, “hopes that shoppers will find their way to those pieces, and from them to the artisans … But more important, their work ‘makes the shop unique, and the visitor’s experience unique’.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Ralph Lauren Turns NYC Street Into Runway

The Wall Street Journal: “In the can-you-top-this stakes of New York Fashion Week stunts, Ralph Lauren is nearly shutting down one block of Madison Avenue on the Upper East Side to host the label’s latest women’s runway show. The block, between 71st and 72nd streets, is home to Mr. Lauren’s flagship women’s store on the left, its men’s store on the right, and children’s store.”

“Models will emerge from the women’s store to sashay down Madison Avenue in a giant glass-enclosed tent. Immediately after, the women’s store will be open to guests and customers, who will be able to buy anything from the collection that was just shown. The move makes Ralph Lauren the largest American brand to make an entire runway collection immediately available to shoppers, part of a growing industry trend to close the monthslong gap between when clothes are shown and when they arrive in stores.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Time, Money & The Roots of Happiness

The New York Times: “Given the choice between more time or more money, which would you pick? … Which would lead to greater happiness — the money or the time? … For a research project, we put this question to more than 4,000 Americans of different ages, income levels, occupations and marital and parental status. In a paper in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science, which we wrote with our student Uri Barnea, we found that most people valued money more than time. Sixty-four percent of the 4,415 people we asked in five surveys chose money.”

‘We had also asked our survey respondents to report their level of happiness and life satisfaction. We found that the people who chose time were on average statistically happier and more satisfied with life than the people who chose money … But maybe this result simply shows that the people who chose money are more financially constrained and therefore less happy. To check this, we also asked respondents to report their annual household income along with the number of hours they work each week (to measure how much time they have).”

“We found that even when we held constant the amount of leisure time and money respondents had (as well as their age, gender, marital status, parental status and the extent to which they valued material possessions), the people who chose time over money were still happier. So if we were to take two people who were otherwise the same, the one who chose time over money would be happier than the one who chose money over time.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Luxury of Privacy: Moda Operandi Madison

The New York Times: “Moda Operandi Madison, which occupies two floors of a 1910 townhouse on 64th Street just west of Madison Avenue, is not a shop as conventionally understood. It is a by-appointment showroom for the very few. Those invited to buy there — likely no more than 300 per year … will enter a store whose goods are customized to their sizes, tastes and tendencies, whose salespeople know the full history of their dealings with Moda Operandi online: what they bought, browsed, bookmarked, exchanged or returned (very little, according to the company).”

“In New York, the only indication from the outside that Moda Operandi Madison is open for business is one small street-facing window, behind which, inside a decorative inset frame, a single Giambattista Valli couture gown undulates slightly in a manufactured breeze … Inside, past the heavy curtains in the vestibule, Moda is a confectionary wonderland, a haven with gelato-colored walls and blush suede furniture … There is an on-site kitchen for when shopping and lunch coincide.”

Moda Operandi “plans an aggressive rollout worldwide, the next in Abu Dhabi in 2017. The rest of the Middle East, Hong Kong and South Korea are on the horizon. The company plans to have 15 showrooms by 2021, the better to white-glove its customers where they live, as well as where they travel.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Rural Retail Joins Digital Age

The Wall Street Journal: “E-commerce hasn’t just reached rural America, it is transforming it by giving small-town residents an opportunity to buy staples online at a cheaper price than the local supermarket. It also provides remote areas with big-city conveniences and the latest products. Contemporary fashion, such as Victoria Secret bathing suits or Tory Burch ballet flats—items that can’t be found at Dollar General—are easily shipped.”

“According to Kantar Retail, about 73% of rural consumers—defined as those who drive at least 10 miles for everyday shopping—are now buying online versus 68% two years ago. Last year, 30% were members of Amazon Prime, up from 22% in 2014 … A Wal-Mart built in 1982 in Altus, Okla. … brought residents choice, convenience and low prices. Now, online shopping is creating another retail revolution here that doesn’t require a half-hour drive to Wal-Mart or roughly 2½-hour drive to Oklahoma City … ”

“E-commerce has provided new opportunities for area residents to earn money. In Willow, Okla., Anneliese Rogers, a mother of three, raised $1,500 in one sitting by selling items from her closet on Facebook. Nearby, Kassandra Bruton mails up to 100 packages a week from her clothing store Trailer Trash … E-commerce has changed life for Flowers Unlimited, the last remaining Mangum, Okla. florist and gift shop on the town’s square. While it has lost much of its bridal and baby registry business to online retailers, it has one big advantage: There is still a need for last-minute gifts, says owner Darla Heatly. ‘They can’t do e-commerce if they don’t plan ahead,’ she adds.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Joy Makers: How Driscoll’s Brands Its Berries

The New York Times: “Its strawberries have been bred for a uniform shape … while Driscoll’s raspberries are pinker and shinier, made to meet desires expressed by consumers … Driscoll’s is betting that once consumers know why its berries are distinctive they will demand them by name … Driscoll’s plans to build awareness methodically, by starting with digital outreach. The company’s website, which largely offered recipes, has been changed to explain more about Driscoll’s berries and what makes them different.”

“The public will get an introduction to the people Driscoll’s calls its Joy Makers — agronomists, breeders, sensory analysts, plant pathologists and entomologists who will explain how the company creates its berries. The company’s YouTube channel will feature stories told by consumers about why berries make them happy. Facebook, Twitter and Instagram will be used to send traffic to the website and YouTube.”

“Labels on the company’s berries have been changed, too, to ‘speak’ more to consumers, using a scriptlike font for the Driscoll’s name with the dot over the ‘i’ colored to match the berries inside the box … Since margins on produce are razor-thin, most companies elect to spend the few dollars they have for marketing to woo buyers for supermarket chains rather than consumers.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Clarence Saunders & The ‘Piggly Wiggly’ Revolution

Jerry Cianciolo: ” … Self-service was a game-changer when Clarence Saunders opened the first Piggly Wiggly in Memphis, Tenn., 100 years ago this month … The 35-year-old Saunders set out to ‘ the demon of high prices’ … He reasoned that shoppers would gladly hand-select their own merchandise, and pay upfront, in exchange for lower prices and faster shopping. Coin-operated cafeterias had demonstrated as much with self-service sandwiches and desserts.”

“King Piggly Wiggly … stocked 1,000 products, four times the variety of a typical market. Customers entered through a turnstile and, basket in hand, followed a path through the aisles. Goods were neatly arranged with clearly marked prices, something heretofore unseen. There were even scales for shoppers to weigh sugar and other staples. The grand opening was a spectacle, featuring a beauty contest … Each woman entering the store received a flower and every child a balloon. A brass band played.”

“By 1923 … more than 1,200 Piggly Wiggly stores across dozens of states were doing $100 million annually (about $1.4 billion in today’s dollars). The company hit 2,600 stores by 1932 … Saunders didn’t integrate circuits or sequence the human genome. An observer once noted that coming up with a self-service grocery was ‘as simple as looking out the window or scratching your ear.’ Still, it was Saunders who gambled on the unconventional approach, doggedly spread self-service across the nation and shaped the grocery industry we know today.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Shoparazzi & The Kmart Shopping Experience

The Wall Street Journal: “Kmart … recently overhauled one of its stores in a Chicago suburb. The Des Plaines, Ill., outlet introduced a modest grocery section with meat and fresh produce … Lowered aisle heights allow customers to see new department signs from across the store, and the layout was made to look more spacious by widening the aisles. On a recent Saturday, a filled the store to take advantage of giveaways and to admire a face-lift that includes new paint, brighter lights, less clutter and the wider aisles.”

Dan Macaluso, a shopper, comments: “It’s amazing what cleaning the floors and turning the lights on can do … It suddenly looks like they want to be in business.” Kmart CMO Kelly Cook explains: “We’re starting here … In the next couple of weeks we’re really going to drill down to understand every single aspect.”

The branch is testing a free personal shopping program called Shoparazzi. Through it, customers can place an online order for pickup—even asking for items Kmart doesn’t stock but which a personal shopper could acquire … Tricia Perrotti, a Kmart spokeswoman, said the Des Plaines renovation is part of a plan to better align marketing and the store experience.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail