The Ikea Recipe Series

Fast Company: “The Ikea Recipe Series … is a collection of posters that you can use to cook your dinner–literally. The posters serve as both a recipe sheet and a cooking wrapper for meals that range from salmon to cobbler to ravioli with meatballs.”

“Each recipe resembles a paint by numbers sketch. Rather than list the ingredients as a long string of text, you’ll see circles in which you sprinkle a tablespoon of salt or a half teaspoon of pepper, and outlines of proteins where you can place the salmon. All of this is drawn with food-safe ink on parchment paper … all you do is roll up the paper and toss the dish into the oven.”

“The recipes are all created with components from Ikea’s own frozen foods available for purchase at its stores … parchment paper traps in moisture as food bakes, making it a forgiving and flavorful way to cook that requires no skills with a sauté pan. It’s also clean. Just toss the wad of paper into the garbage at the end of the meal, and the dishes are done. And perhaps most importantly of all, the Recipe Series looks fun, like an adult coloring book that you can eat.”

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Nike Goes Local & Gets Physical

The New York Times: “Nike shaped itself into one of the globe’s most recognizable brands. Now it has a new idea: Go local. Facing pressure from investors and competitors like Adidas, Nike said Thursday that it was shaking up its organization to focus more on consumers in just a dozen cities around the world and on releasing new products faster in those places.”

“To keep its products relevant and make its service more personal, Nike aims to develop what it called a ‘local business, on a global scale’ and ‘deeply’ serve customers in 12 cities, including New York, Paris, Beijing and Milan. Those places are expected to deliver 80 percent of the company’s growth over the next two and a half years.”

“Despite the move to online shopping that is transforming retailing, Nike is not giving up on its physical stores. Instead, the company will use the stores to try to foster relationships with customers and further link the shops to its digital efforts. Nike, which is known for sponsoring star athletes like LeBron James and Rafael Nadal, will also try to speed up how quickly it designs and works with its suppliers to deliver new gear. The company wants to cut its product-creation cycle time in half.”

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Report: Best Buy To Trial ‘Test Drive’

Retail Dive: “Best Buy is trying harness something that’s already common practice among consumers — the concept of buying something to figure out if you really want it, knowing full well there is a decent chance you will eventually return it. It’s perhaps a cumbersome way to find out if a purchase is really worth making, but it has become a culturally acceptable method.”

“With a try-before-you-buy program, Best Buy is looking to divert that sort of activity, and convince a customer who normally would buy and return later to pay an additional fee to rent an item for several days to decide if they really want it. The retailer recognizes that such a fee might not be attractive on all products, and for now seems to be reserving it for a handful of bigger-ticket tech products.”

“The program could also help Best Buy capture a prospective customer’s attention earlier in the buying process while they are still researching a purchase. Amazon has done very well in making itself essentially a shopping search engine to be used by consumers in the earliest phases of their product hunts, and Best Buy may feel it can get in on that action by enticing customers to try products without a full commitment.”

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Tote Bags Carry The Brand Message

The Wall Street Journal: “Sturdy, canvas, waterproof or made of recycled material, tote bags take up an expanding part of our lives (and car trunks) as cities, counties and states continue to impose fees or bans on plastic bags. Stores either give them away free with purchase or sell them for a couple bucks in the hopes that consumers will like them and carry them—and that others will notice.”

“When totes are durable and reusable they become longer-lived ad campaigns. Swimwear label 6 Shore Road’s founder, Pooja Kharbanda, says that she made 1,000 tote bags to distribute at pop-up stores in Montauk, N.Y., and Newport, R.I., this summer. She estimates the cost is 2.5 times what it would be if she had just chosen paper bags. But she hopes the bags will turn up on the beach, carrying flip flops and towels … Some retailers sell the bags to help cover the cost. H&M ’s tote bags cost $2 to $4 and help spread the word about its garment recycling program. Customers who trade in old clothing or textiles can get 15% off their purchase.”

Marybeth Schmitt of H&M North America comments: “We know that word-of-mouth is the strongest kind of advertising. And, this is like a form of word-of-mouth. They are recommending it by wearing it.”

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Footwear Revolution: Sneaking Up on Fast Fashion

Quartz: “A sneaker starts with a sketch. Before a brand can turn that idea into a prototype, it has to produce the patterns that serve as the instructions for the factory putting it together, and create the metal mold used for the sole. This process alone takes weeks. It then makes a sample, which usually requires more fine tuning. Several samples may be necessary, with the process repeated each time a new one is made. It can take a year before a final design is ready for production.”

“Now virtual prototyping is letting brands shorten that timeline dramatically … 3D printing is also hugely beneficial for rapid prototyping, since it lets brands skip the tooling step needed to build molds for foam soles. That alone can take a month. But brands can now print prototypes of a sole in a matter of hours.”

“Why should shoppers care? Together these changes in design and manufacturing mean they won’t need to wait to get the products they want, and it should soon be feasible to get items custom-made, since it will be easier and cheaper for brands to produce just one of an item … For the brands themselves, cutting back lead times will let them respond to the market better, meaning they won’t need to make vast quantities of shoes in advance.”

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Ikea Frakta Bag: Dark-Horse Design Icon

Fast Company: “Ikea’s bright-blue Frakta bag has become something of a dark-horse design icon. Who would’ve guessed a 99-cent crinkly plastic tote would be as beloved and as indispensable, to some, as an iPhone? … Ikea casts the bag in a democratic light, showing how it’s a does-it-all-design–grocery bag, makeshift umbrella, beach tote–in virtually every scenario: vacation, biking, at home, at work, even when kicking out your ex and all his junk. In Ikea’s eyes, the bag is common ground for everyone.”

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Supermodel & Supermarket: Klum & Lidl Collaborate

USA Today: “Former supermodel Heidi Klum is going to offer her designer fashions in the oddest of places … Lidl, an upstart discount supermarket chain based in Germany that opens its first U.S. stores on June 15 … That means buying a dress and salad dressing on the same shopping trip. Mass merchandisers like Target and Costco have long offered grocery departments in their stores. The Lidl idea flips the concept to make fashion secondary to food.”

“Lidl stores offer weekly promotions of non-food products, ranging from fitness gear to power tools to small kitchen appliances, like juicers and panini presses, according to Lidl U.S. spokesman Will Harwood. In the supermarket business, non-foods are known for typically offering some of the best profit margins in stores — and unlike cucumbers, they aren’t perishable except for long-term fashion whims.”

Lidl spokesman Will Harwood comments: “She’s an international fashion icon. She’s extremely passionate, creating incredible fashion that is high end, but also attainable and it worked really well with what we do. We’re very focused at delivering top quality and great prices. She integrates with that really well.”

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Walmart Tests Pickup Kiosk

The Oklahoman: “Walmart is trying out an automated kiosk where online shoppers can pick up their groceries … The kiosk is a 20- by 80-foot building in the parking lot at the Walmart Super Center at N Council and W Britton Roads in Oklahoma City. Walmart spokesman Scott Markley said the kiosk is capable of fulfilling hundreds of orders throughout the day that are placed by customers who shop online or through their mobile browser at walmart.com/grocery.”

“More than 30,000 items, including fresh produce, meats, dairy products and organic groceries, can be ordered online for the same price they cost in the store and can be picked up free, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The minimum purchase is $30. The retail operation will ask customers for feedback online as it tests the product during the next several months.”

“Customers place and pay for their orders online, and those orders are filled inside the store by Walmart associates that store officials have said are trained to handpick the freshest produce and choicest cuts of meat. The orders are delivered to the kiosk in bins that are stored inside. The kiosk customer pulls up to the building and walks up to an interface station to enter a pickup code. The kiosk retrieves the order, delivering it to the customer in a process that takes a minute or less.”

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Hollar: The First Online Dollar Store

Fast Company: Hollar is “the first online dollar store … reimagining the physical stores as a digital discount haven where the majority of inventory costs $2 and nothing goes for more than $10. Tens of thousands of products are available, ranging from necessities to impulse buys … Hollar stocks brands you recognize (Huggies, Jergens, Febreze, Pop-Tarts) and ones you probably don’t (Zing, Num Noms, Bolis Ice Pops). Via the site and app, you can buy a $3 cellphone case alongside $1 dishwasher soap and $1.50 baby bibs.”

“Hollar experienced double-digit month-over-month sales in the last year and hit its first million-dollar month in April 2016, just five months after launch, with the average purchase totaling $30 … Hollar’s typical customer is female, a mom between the ages of 25-34. And, unlike the target client of most retail startups, she is not an affluent resident of the country’s coasts. She lives in suburban and rural areas, with a middle-to-low household income.”

“A similarity to Pinterest has proved appealing to millennial moms, who make up a full 85% of Hollar’s customers and are usually in the market for deals in the top categories of toys and home goods … There’s no question that the country’s widespread move to mobile has added to Hollar’s success. While one in five American households still doesn’t have a home computer, nearly all own a smartphone—and they do everything on it.”

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Luxury Retail Is Bleak on Bleeker Street

The New York Times: “How Bleecker went from quintessential Greenwich Village street, with shops like Condomania and Rebel Rebel Records, to a destination for Black Card-wielding 1-percenters, to its current iteration as a luxury blightscape is a classic New York story. It involves a visionary businessman, a hit HBO show, an Afghan immigrant, a star architect, European tourists, aggressive landlords and, above all, the relentless commercial churn of Manhattan.”

“In 1996, Magnolia Bakery opened at 401 Bleecker … It was just another local business, like the bodega operated by Turks or the Greek diner Manatus. But on July 9, 2000, Magnolia was featured on ‘Sex and the City’ … The 30 seconds of Carrie Bradshaw and her friend Miranda eating cupcakes outside the bakery were all it took to turn the street … The Magnolia crowd in part convinced Robert Duffy, then the president and vice chairman of Marc Jacobs, that the company should open a store nearby … the arrival of the first Marc Jacobs store, with its trendsetting clothes and clientele of fashion editors and celebrities like Sofia Coppola, was the tipping point.”

“And then? Blowback. While quirky independent stores couldn’t afford the new Bleecker, it became apparent over time that neither could the corporate brands that had remade the street. An open secret among retailers had it that Bleecker Street was a fancy Potemkin village, empty of customers. Celebrities shopped there because they wouldn’t be bothered … The original Marc Jacobs store on Bleecker that started the boom” is now empty, “its windows blacked out … Marjorie Reitman, who has lived in the Village for 43 years …has an idea for that space and the other empty stores that dot Bleecker Street like missing teeth in a very expensive mouth.” Her thought: “They should all be pot shops. Seriously. I’m not kidding. I can’t imagine what else could go in and pay the rent.”

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