Amazongeddon: The New Supermarket Battleground

Quartz: “In southwest Ohio, the prices of staple foods are hitting the floor. A carton of eggs in Cincinnati supermarkets are going for as little as 39 cents. And gallon-sized jugs of milk are selling for less than a dollar. The American grocery store is about to become a battleground—and consumers will love it.”

“Shoppers in the UK certainly did. Established companies such as Tesco forfeited millions in sales to compete on price with German discount grocers Aldi and Lidl, who began opening more and more stores. Now, those discount brands have made it to the US, and have opened hundreds of stores across the country … These telltale signs of a brewing US grocery-store war are happening just as online retailer Amazon has decided it wants to shoehorn itself into the grocery business by acquiring health food grocery chain Whole Foods for $13.7 billion.”

“But disrupting groceries will be a lot different than shaking up publishing, which is how Amazon got its start. Unlike bookstores of the late 1990s, clawing away at market share by driving prices down is a game supermarket companies are already good at playing.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

How TJ Maxx Defies Digital Gravity

The Wall Street Journal: “Traditional retailers are in crisis, damaged by rapidly shifting consumer tastes, technological change and cut-throat price competition. And then there’s TJX Co., which is defying gravity with the simple idea that under the right circumstances people still like to shop in stores … Central to TJX’s success are its merchants. The company employs more than 1,000 buyers who buy apparel and other goods from more than 18,000 suppliers around the world. Each buyer controls millions of dollars and has authority to cut deals on the spot, unlike most department stores, which can take weeks to review and approve orders.”

“Stores typically get deliveries several times a week. The schedule ensures a continuous stream of products to lure shoppers. And because TJX doesn’t purchase the full range of colors and styles, stores have one or two items in a particular color or size, giving customers an urgency to buy … Its stores have no walls between departments, so it can quickly reconfigure floor plans. Similar clothes from different labels can be found on the same rack.”

“One area where TJX trails other retailers is on the Internet … Some brands won’t let TJX sell their products online because they don’t want the items to be easily searchable at lower prices. For certain brands that allow online sales, shoppers have to click on items before they can see brand names. The restraints are similar to those in the physical world, where some companies do not allow TJX to advertise their brands. Advertising individual labels is not part of TJX’s marketing strategy.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Zero-Margins & The Future of Retail

Vox: “Competing with Amazon is terrifying for any incumbent business because the company’s executive team operates on a radical model whereby the company’s overall net income is nearly zero quarter after quarter … That’s an enormous problem for every grocery chain in America, which already operate on razor-thin margins … A Whole Foods under Amazon’s stewardship will almost certainly accept lower profit margins than it does as an independent chain — and that spells trouble for everyone else in the grocery business.”

“Whole Foods could deliver value to Amazon without necessarily delivering profits. The stores would create a useful additional channel for selling Kindles, Echoes, Fire TV boxes and other Amazon hardware. And by linking discounts to Amazon Prime membership, it could drive sales of those. More subtly but perhaps more importantly, encouraging Whole Foods shoppers to in some sense ‘log in’ with their Prime accounts would generate tons of new user data that could feed the larger Amazon beast.”

“The bottom line is there are lots of ways that a cheaper, but fundamentally similar, version of Whole Foods could contribute to the Amazon gestalt even while run as a zero-margin business.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Amazon Patents Shopper-Control Technology

The Washington Post: “Amazon was awarded a patent May 30 that could help it choke off a common issue faced by many physical stores: Customers’ use of smartphones to compare prices even as they walk around a shop. The phenomenon, often known as mobile ‘window shopping,’ has contributed to a worrisome decline for traditional retailers.”

“But Amazon now has the technology to prevent that type of behavior when customers enter any of its physical stores and log onto the WiFi networks there. Titled ‘Physical Store Online Shopping Control,’ Amazon’s patent describes a system that can identify a customer’s Internet traffic and sense when the smartphone user is trying to access a competitor’s website.”

“When that happens, Amazon may take one of several actions. It may block access to the competitor’s site, preventing customers from viewing comparable products from rivals. It might redirect the customer to Amazon’s own site or to other, Amazon-approved sites. It might notify an Amazon salesperson to approach the customer. Or it might send the customer’s smartphone a text message, coupon or other information designed to lure the person back into Amazon’s orbit.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Hollar: The First Online Dollar Store

Fast Company: Hollar is “the first online dollar store … reimagining the physical stores as a digital discount haven where the majority of inventory costs $2 and nothing goes for more than $10. Tens of thousands of products are available, ranging from necessities to impulse buys … Hollar stocks brands you recognize (Huggies, Jergens, Febreze, Pop-Tarts) and ones you probably don’t (Zing, Num Noms, Bolis Ice Pops). Via the site and app, you can buy a $3 cellphone case alongside $1 dishwasher soap and $1.50 baby bibs.”

“Hollar experienced double-digit month-over-month sales in the last year and hit its first million-dollar month in April 2016, just five months after launch, with the average purchase totaling $30 … Hollar’s typical customer is female, a mom between the ages of 25-34. And, unlike the target client of most retail startups, she is not an affluent resident of the country’s coasts. She lives in suburban and rural areas, with a middle-to-low household income.”

“A similarity to Pinterest has proved appealing to millennial moms, who make up a full 85% of Hollar’s customers and are usually in the market for deals in the top categories of toys and home goods … There’s no question that the country’s widespread move to mobile has added to Hollar’s success. While one in five American households still doesn’t have a home computer, nearly all own a smartphone—and they do everything on it.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Luxury Retail Is Bleak on Bleeker Street

The New York Times: “How Bleecker went from quintessential Greenwich Village street, with shops like Condomania and Rebel Rebel Records, to a destination for Black Card-wielding 1-percenters, to its current iteration as a luxury blightscape is a classic New York story. It involves a visionary businessman, a hit HBO show, an Afghan immigrant, a star architect, European tourists, aggressive landlords and, above all, the relentless commercial churn of Manhattan.”

“In 1996, Magnolia Bakery opened at 401 Bleecker … It was just another local business, like the bodega operated by Turks or the Greek diner Manatus. But on July 9, 2000, Magnolia was featured on ‘Sex and the City’ … The 30 seconds of Carrie Bradshaw and her friend Miranda eating cupcakes outside the bakery were all it took to turn the street … The Magnolia crowd in part convinced Robert Duffy, then the president and vice chairman of Marc Jacobs, that the company should open a store nearby … the arrival of the first Marc Jacobs store, with its trendsetting clothes and clientele of fashion editors and celebrities like Sofia Coppola, was the tipping point.”

“And then? Blowback. While quirky independent stores couldn’t afford the new Bleecker, it became apparent over time that neither could the corporate brands that had remade the street. An open secret among retailers had it that Bleecker Street was a fancy Potemkin village, empty of customers. Celebrities shopped there because they wouldn’t be bothered … The original Marc Jacobs store on Bleecker that started the boom” is now empty, “its windows blacked out … Marjorie Reitman, who has lived in the Village for 43 years …has an idea for that space and the other empty stores that dot Bleecker Street like missing teeth in a very expensive mouth.” Her thought: “They should all be pot shops. Seriously. I’m not kidding. I can’t imagine what else could go in and pay the rent.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

$13 Burgers Slows Demand for Fast Food

The Wall Street Journal “As the number of outlets serving ‘better’ burgers—featuring nontraditional toppings and artisan buns—has skyrocketed over the past decade, so has the average burger tab, turning some customers off … Lunch traffic to quick-serve hamburger restaurants fell 5% last year—the biggest year-over-year decline that market-research firm NPD Group Inc. has recorded … The average lunch burger check—including fries and a beverage—has risen 22% since the financial crisis to $5.83, with a 4% increase last year alone, according to NPD.”

“With so much competition and only so many ways to differentiate a burger, upstarts have been coming out with evermore gourmet ingredients, such as Wagyu beef, roasted garlic aioli and truffled arugula, which have raised the bar for burgers overall—and their price tag …they can beef up profits by charging extra for additional toppings … A basic hamburger at (Fatburger) starts at $5.94, but after adding bacon and chili, it is $8.14. With fries and a drink, the combo totals $13.37.”

McDonald’s recently adopted a back-to-basics approach after years of chasing health-minded customers with products such as salads, sandwich wraps and fruit smoothies. It had neglected its burgers and recently found that only one in five millennials had ever tried its signature Big Mac … The burger giant has been trying to improve the quality of its burgers by adjusting temperatures and cook times to deliver hotter, fresher burgers. Next year, it plans to make its Quarter Pounders with fresh, instead of frozen, beef. It is also in the process of rolling out higher-end, customizable burgers from a ‘Signature Crafted’ menu to compete with the ‘better’ burger places, but at a much lower price.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

How Best Buy Engages Shoppers

The Wall Street Journal: “Best Buy, the electronics giant left for dead a few years ago, is bucking America’s retail slump by turning its cavernous stores from a potential drag on its business into a way to fend off Amazon.com Inc.”

“To fend off digital competition, Best Buy gave up efforts to charge consumers more in stores than online. It promised in 2013 to match online competitors’ prices and brought its prices in line with Amazon’s—a move that has paid dividends now that shoppers can instantly check prices on their smartphones … The price guarantee made a loyal shopper out of Anton Robinson, a 34-year-old lawyer in New York City. He buys his music equipment from Best Buy because he prefers to test products in person and doesn’t have to compare prices.”

“Best Buy also found a way to get more out of its giant stores. The company eliminated much of the floorspace once dedicated to DVDs and other media and has given it to brands such as Samsung, Verizon and Microsoft , which both pay rent and provide staff with expertise … Best Buy plans a nationwide rollout of in-home advisory services, in which consultants will visit consumers to field technology questions. Says CEO Hubert Joly: “Having these conversations in the home unlocks all sorts of discussions with the customers. There’s some needs that people never talk about in the stores.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

‘Amazon Charts’ Re-Define ‘Best Seller’

The New York Times: Amazon now tracks “not only the top-selling digital and print books on Amazon, but the ones that customers spend the most time reading … With its lists, Amazon aims to redefine the notion of a best seller, expanding it to include books that are ‘borrowed’ from its e-book subscription service, and ones that are streamed on Audible. As a result, the lists give increased visibility to books that might not typically appear on other best-seller lists.”

“All of Amazon’s acquisitions and new features are having a cumulative effect, allowing the company to draw on its vast customer base and troves of data to discover what is popular, and return that information to customers, creating a lucrative feedback loop … Crowdsourcing and data mining are also driving the company’s approach to its bookstores, which act as showcases for books popular with customers on the site. While the stores have traditional categories, like fiction, nonfiction and travel, the most eye-catching shelves feature categories culled from Amazon’s customer data.”

“The first thing customers see when they walk into the store is a large display table, labeled Highly Rated, which includes books with an average rating of 4.8 stars or higher on a scale of 5 … Another display case, labeled Page-Turners, features books that people finish reading on their Kindle in fewer than three days … Another section features the most ‘wished for’ books from Amazon’s website … The books are all displayed face out. Under each book is a card with the average customer rating, the number of reviews and a featured review from an Amazon reader. Displaying the full cover of each book mimics the visual look of Amazon’s website, and might lure customers to unfamiliar titles.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Algorithmic Retail: Beyond Dynamic Pricing

The Wall Street Journal: “Advances in A.I. are allowing retail and wholesale firms to move beyond ‘dynamic pricing’ software, which has for years helped set prices for fast-moving goods, like airline tickets or flat-screen televisions. Older pricing software often used simple rules, such as always keeping prices lower than a competitor.”

“These new systems crunch mountains of historical and real-time data to predict how customers and competitors will react to any price change under different scenarios, giving them an almost superhuman insight into market dynamics. Programmed to meet a certain goal—such as boosting sales—the algorithms constantly update tactics after learning from experience … The software learns when raising prices drives away customers and when it doesn’t, leading to lower prices at times when price-sensitive customers are likely.”

“Algorithms can also figure out what products are usually purchased together, allowing them to optimize the price of a whole shopping cart. If customers tend to be sensitive to milk prices, but less so to cereal prices, the software might beat a competitor’s price on milk, and make up margin on cereal.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail