Does Apple Hack Its Own Products?

Axios: “Every time Apple releases its newest iPhone or OS, there are significant spikes in searches for terms like ‘iPhone not working,’ ‘iPhone slow,’ and ‘iPhone problems,’ according to data from Google Trends.This has led to a conspiracy theory that has been revived almost every year, claiming that Apple intentionally slows down old phones to entice iPhone users to upgrade to their newest, often more expensive product. But the phenomenon can also be explained by a few other reasons.”

For example: “Older models have to work harder to run everything the newest, superior OS provides, and therefore consume more energy and battery life.” Also: Patrick Moorhead, an analyst for Moor Insights Strategy comments: “One very important thing to consider is that at the same time of an OS upgrade, application developers upgrade their applications. Therefore at the same time the new OS is indexing for Spotlight, it is updating applications, which temporarily would slow down the phone.”

And: “Most iPhone users are quick to update to the newest OS, and tend to be critical of every included change. This critical mindset might cause some to feel like like their phone is working slower than before at first … Nothing has been ‘proven’ here, but there are many logical explanations for why iPhones might not run quite as smoothly after an OS update that don’t include Apple maliciously hacking their own products.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Leinenkugel: Cult Classic or Soda Beer?

The New York Times: “Leinenkugel’s and its parent company, MillerCoors, would like to make the brand more than just a cult or local favorite. And they have largely succeeded with Summer Shandy, a breakout hit released in 2007 that has inspired a whole line of flavor-enhanced brews — watermelon, pomegranate, cocoa-raspberry — and, for the first time, brought the country’s seventh-oldest brewery to taps and store shelves nationwide.”

“But for some longtime drinkers, including many among the 11,000 who gathered in Chippewa Falls for the anniversary party, watching trendy shandies eclipse the workingman’s beers their grandparents once enjoyed is disorienting. During a question-and-answer session with the company’s brewmasters, one wistful Leinie’s drinker shouted, ‘When are you going to brew some beer that tastes like beer?'”

“In August, MillerCoors released Leinenkugel’s Original nationwide for the first time, part of a fall sampler pack of Leinie’s classic brews … with light-bodied German beers enjoying a resurgence, Leinenkugel sees an opportunity to attract new drinkers to the clean, malty lagers beloved in Wisconsin — particularly the 35 percent of shandy drinkers who, company research suggests, didn’t previously drink beer. It won’t be easy. ‘That’s a tall order,’said Ryan Schmiege, assistant brewmaster at the 29-year-old Deschutes Brewery in Oregon and a Wisconsin native. ‘Shandies are the soda of beer. They’re fun, but I wonder whether they’ll really convince people to try the old stuff.'”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Down Under: Introducing Vegemite Blend 17

The New York Times: “Vegemite, the classic condiment found on breakfast tables in every corner of Australia for nearly a century, is going posh. Bega, manufacturer of the iconic — if divisive — yeast extract spread, released a new and more expensive version of the product this week, raising questions about whether the brand had abandoned its humble roots in favor of a more affluent demographic.”

“The new variety, Vegemite Blend 17, is sold in achingly artisanal packaging that includes an unnecessary cardboard box, a gold-colored lid and a price tag more than double that of a traditional jar, coming in at 7 Australian dollars, or nearly $5.50 … Anthony Agius, a Melbourne resident who says he has eaten Vegemite for 32 years, purchased the new product out of curiosity … Mr. Agius said he could not easily distinguish the new blend from the original.”

“When asked whether the new product may be a cynical, short-lived marketing ploy to draw attention and stoke lighthearted controversy, (marketing director Ben Hill) simply encouraged Australians to ’embrace the taste.’ The company, he said, did not plan to reissue the product after its initial run of 450,000 units. But if the new blend proved popular, Mr. Hill said, Bega might keep making it.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Future of Plant-Based Protein

“Look at the dairy category: 14 percent of it now is plant-based, like soy or almong or rice milk. I believe the same could be true for meat. If we get to that meat [department] I believe there’s potential for at least 14 percent of this category to become plant-based.” – Seth Goldman, executive chairman, Beyond Meat, in brandchannel.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Ypperlig: IKEA’s ‘Excellent’ Adventure

Quartz: “IKEA’s new collaboration with Danish product designers HAY is intended to ‘challenge people’s perception of IKEA quality and design.’ Ypperlig (Swedish for ‘excellent’ ) debuts as IKEA’s newest and most collectible furniture line … The 15-year old furniture design brand is among the leading players in the modern Scandinavian design scene—their Copenhagen showroom is a regular stop in design tours of the city.”

“Design connoisseurs swooned over the handsome Ypperlig injection moulded chairs and coveted the stylish color update to IKEA’s iconic Frakta shopping bag.”

IKEA spokesperson Johanna Martin comments: “We believe in making products that our customers want to keep and live with for a long time, regardless if it’s a product made in collaboration with someone or part of our ordinary range. But there is also an emotional connection which is important when making things sustainable. If you like the product you will keep the product longer.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Vision: Michelin Prints The ‘Perfect’ Tire

The Verge: “They’re completely airless, last virtually forever, and could be the perfect tire for our autonomous future. Michelin, the 128-year-old tire manufacturer based in Clermont-Ferrand, France, recently unveiled a 3D-printed tire concept that it says could be the ideal ride for self-driving cars. It just needs to figure out how to actually manufacture them first.”

“Dubbed ‘Vision,’ these spidery, psychedelic-looking sponges are printed from bio-sourced and biodegradable materials, including natural rubber, bamboo, paper, tin cans, wood, electronic and plastic waste, hay, tire chips, used metals, cloth, cardboard, molasses, and orange zest.”

“These tires would be embedded with RFID sensors to collect data and predict performance and function of the vehicle. And they will be adaptive to different conditions. Heading to the mountains for some skiing? Drive through a Michelin printing station and get your tires retrofitted for snowy terrain … this isn’t Michelin’s first rimless, airless tire to be released. The Twheel, an airless tire concept that emerged over a decade ago, is currently in use in small-frame, low-speed vehicles and appliances like golf carts and lawn mowers.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Costco Knockoffs: It’s Cruel to Be KIND

The Wall Street Journal: “Kirkland Signature, Costco’s store brand, is challenging manufacturers hoping to earn or retain a coveted spot at the warehouse retailer. Since 1995, Costco has used its Kirkland products to attract shoppers, building a reputation for quality and low prices on milk, toilet paper, men’s shirts and golf balls bearing the unassuming red logo. About a quarter of Costco’s $118.7 billion in annual sales come from Kirkland Signature products, and the percentage is growing, company executives say.”

“Costco often introduces a new Kirkland product when its buyers or executives believe a brand isn’t selling at the lowest possible price.” For example: “Kind Bars sold for about $18 for a pack of 18 … When almond prices dropped in 2016 … Costco developed the Kirkland Signature Nut Bars, made by Leclerc Foods USA, which is owned by Leclerc Group, a Canadian manufacturer, and now sells a 30-pack for $17 in stores.”

“Kind Bars are still carried at Costco, though mostly new varieties, including fruit bars, mini nut bars and a peanut-free bar. ‘We look forward to continuing to grow with them,’ a Kind spokeswoman said.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

That’s Nuts: Milkadamia’s ‘Free Range’ Trees

Quartz: “In the wild world of product claims, the fledgling macadamia-nut-milk industry is charging into the US market elbows out, taking pot-shots at the dairy and almond industries along the way. This explains the unabashed claim on Milkadamia’s cartons, which is that the company only sources nuts from so-called ‘free-range trees.’The Chicago-based company’s nuts are grown from trees in Australia, then shipped to the US for processing.”

“To be sure, ‘free-range tree’ does not fall within the scientific lexicon used by horticulturalists. It’s nothing more than a marketing ploy to hook consumers enamored by product claims. Milkadamia cartons go on to explain that its milk comes from ‘trees supporting life, not trees on life support,’ meaning they aren’t attached to irrigation systems.”

“It’s meant to be a ‘gentle’ dig at California almond farmers, Milkadamia CEO Jim Richards tells Quartz. He characterizes these farmers—much to their chagrin—as being dependent on irrigating water from aquifers … In less than two years Milkadamia has expanded its US footprint to more than 5,000 retail locations and will be sold in Walmart in January, Richards says.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Ruby Chocolate: Neither Bitter, Milky nor Sweet

The Wall Street Journal: “Barry Callebaut Group … has produced a type of chocolate extracted from the Ruby cocoa bean, resulting in a chocolate that is reddish, a hue usually associated with lipstick, not chocolate … The company described the taste as ‘not bitter, milky or sweet, but a tension between berry-fruitiness and luscious smoothness.’ No berries, berry flavor or colors are added, it said.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Future of Toys: Dual Play

The Wall Street Journal: “Digital offerings aren’t threatening to wipe out physical toys anytime soon. Kids ‘are still reading books, still using Legos, people are making a place for physical toys,’ said Judy Ishayik, owner of Mary Arnold Toys, an independent toy shop in Manhattan. But, she said, ‘there’s more dual play,’ where physical toys are paired with a digital component. She pointed to Crayola, owned by Hallmark Cards Inc., which rolled out an app that turns coloring-book creations into animated online representations. Hasbro Inc.’s Love2Learn Elmo app provides children with a way of interacting verbally with their Elmo dolls.”

“Play on touch-screen devices outranks all other kinds of play in frequency—including with blocks, board games and puzzles—according to a 2014 survey by New York research firm Michael Cohen Group of 350 parents with children age 12 and under.”

“Some of Lego’s recent woes are because toys tied to movies have underperformed retailers’ and manufacturers’ expectations. Lego products tied to last year’s ‘Star Wars’ movie, ‘Rogue One,’ didn’t generate the same excitement as had the prior installment, ‘The Force Awakens,’ which was the first ‘Star Wars’ movie in a decade … Another big bet that didn’t fully deliver: the company’s second movie based on its toys, called ‘Lego Batman. Toys ‘R’ Us Inc. said toys tied to the movie missed sales goals, even though Lego spent heavily to try to boost interest.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail