The Art of Retail: A New Media Canvas

The New York Times: “Art is playing a larger role in stores, as retailers do whatever they can to make shopping in person fun, inspiring and worth the time.” Peter Marino, a retail architect, comments: “Shopping can be stressful but the art uplifts and makes you smile. And when people go back to the hotel, it’s the art they discuss and remember.”

“The focus on art is part of the change in retail and the continuing move to digital transactions. ‘The product isn’t enough now, it’s the experience,’ said Rob Ronen, an owner of Material Good, a watch and jewelry store in SoHo … ‘Because if the shop is just about the product people go online’ … The jeweler Stephen Webster opened a store in London’s Mayfair neighborhood in May that has opposite the door a taxidermied swan in full flight, with wings outstretched, greeting his visitors.” He explains: “People ask questions about the swan, and it focuses people more on what is in store.”

“Art historically has a strong track record drawing people into stores. Take the Paris department store Bon Marché, which became the fashionable place to be in 1875 when it opened an art gallery … Carla Sozzani, founder of Milan’s 10 Corso Como concept store, which has blended fashion, design and books with art for 25 years, believes that displaying art slows the way people shop.” She comments: “Even the way people purchase changes because they think more about what they are buying so they buy things they really want, which creates a faithful clientele.”

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Robo-Shop: Not an Automatic Win

The Economist: “The idea is that a combination of smart gadgets and predictive data analytics could decide exactly what goods are delivered when, to which household. The most advanced version might resemble Spotify, a music-streaming service, but for stuff. This future is inching closer, thanks to initiatives from Amazon, lots of startup firms and also from big consumer companies such as Procter & Gamble.”

“Buying experiments so far fall into two categories. The first is exploratory. A service helps a shopper try new things, choosing products on his or her behalf … The second category of automated consumption is more functional. A service automates the purchase of an item that is bought frequently … If a shopper automates the delivery of a particular item, the theory is that he is likely to be more loyal.”

“But neither Amazon nor the big product brands should celebrate a new era of shopping just yet … One problem may be the e-commerce giant’s prices, which fluctuate often. Another report … found that far more British consumers would prefer a smart device that ordered the cheapest item in a category to one that summoned up the same brand each time. That suggests that automated shopping, as it expands, might make life harder for big brands, not prop them up.”

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How Wyndham Wins the Loyalty Game

The Wall Street Journal: “The top performer in a new comparison of hotel loyalty program payback is Wyndham Hotel Group, which revamped its Wyndham Rewards loyalty program 18 months ago to make it a lot more beneficial to travelers … average payback at Wyndham is nearly 14%. For every $100 you spend at Wyndham, Ramada, Days Inn, Wingate and other hotels, you can get back $13.60 worth of stays on points.”

“Wyndham … changed its program in 2015 to price every award room the same: 15,000 points. There are no capacity controls or blackout dates and you earn 10 points for every dollar spent, so points accumulate quickly. Wyndham says redemptions are up 90% since before the change and seven million people have joined the program since the 2015 relaunch, a 17% increase to 47.5 million members.”

“Wyndham says it is investing $100 million in the loyalty program, most of which is going to hotel owners to buy rooms for free stays. Since most hotels are franchised under a brand name but owned separately, hotel owners pay the chain a small percentage of room revenue to cover points given out, and then hotels that provide free rooms when points are redeemed get paid by the chain. In Wyndham’s case, the chain is subsidizing the cost of the free rooms for hotel owners.”

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British Airways: Beginning its Descent?

The Economist: “Back in the 1990s, British Airways, the nation’s flag-carrier, proclaimed itself to be ‘the world’s favourite airline’ in a long-running and hugely successful advertising campaign … Were British Airways to run the same campaign today, it would probably stir a mixture of derision abroad and embarrassment at home” amid “a relentless dilution of BA’s once-superior customer service and on-board product.”

“Despite notching up five consecutive years in the black, BA is getting even stingier … Without formally announcing any changes, the airline last month stopped providing two meals to Economy passengers on flights under eight-and-a-half hours. In lieu of a complimentary sandwich six hours after their first meal, travellers on the London to New York route are now presented with one—and only one … fun-sized chocolate bar.”

In addition (or subtraction): “bottled water, pretzels, cheese and biscuits will also be removed from Economy cabins … tuck boxes—trolleys filled with free snacks on long-haul flights—will be removed from Economy, while Club passengers will no longer receive a choice of their starter. Next month, the airline will reportedly stop providing free newspapers at the gate for inbound short-haul flights to London … Taken in isolation, these measures are tolerable if not popular. But BA should be careful; reputations are more difficult to win back than to lose.”

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Zappos: A Short Story About a Long Call

Business Insider: “A Zappos employee recently had a customer service call that lasted 10 hours and 43 minutes, breaking an internal record at the Amazon-owned online retailer … Steven Weinstein answered a call from a customer who needed some help with an order of a few items. The two began to chat, and even after she was helped, she stayed on the line.”

“Weinstein said he only took one break during the nearly 11-hour period, about two-and-a-half hours on, to go to the bathroom. One of his colleagues brought him food and water during the call.”

“At Zappos, call center employees are trained to use interactions with customers as a way to build relationships, not make a sale. And if a call is going long during a particularly busy time, then it’s up to the employee overseeing the call center to assign more people to calls rather than encourage an employee to end a call early. The last longest customer service call was set by Mary Tennant in 2012, at nine hours and 37 minutes.”

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Direct Disruption: The Tide Wash Club

The Wall Street Journal: “Blindsided by the success of the upstart Dollar Shave Club, an online subscription service that chipped away at the dominance of Gillette razors, P&G executives say they are focusing not only on what consumers buy but on how they buy … P&G is experimenting with … the Tide Wash Club, an online subscription service for the dissolvable Tide Pods capsules that are the company’s highest-priced laundry detergent. The company offers free shipping at regular intervals.”

“Another new offering: Tide Spin, an undertaking P&G is calling the ‘uberization of laundry,’ in which customers in parts of Chicago can use a smartphone app to order laundry pickup and delivery from Tide-branded couriers. With the ventures, P&G is delving deeper into the business of connecting consumers directly with the products it makes, especially a new generation less loyal to the company’s big brands.”

“Privately, P&G executives acknowledge the company was caught off guard by the success of Dollar Shave Club, which started in 2011 and says it now has 3.2 million subscribers. ‘It was probably on the radar but we weren’t necessarily having the right conversation around what might disrupt us,’ said a person familiar with the company’s thinking.”

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Loyalty Cards Pivot: From Discounts to ‘Experience’

The New York Times: “Research … shows that while people say discounts are important, they also ‘overwhelmingly say they want special treatment and offers not available to others in a loyalty program’, says Emily Collins of Forrester Research. ‘They come for the perks, but they stay for the experience’ … Sephora’s rewards program offers free samples and tutorials to loyal customers. It has three tiers, and the top spenders are invited to free closed-door events like Beauty Before Brunch, where they receive makeup lessons, discounts and a goody bag.”

“The samples don’t cost much, but are of great value to customers who want the newest makeup and hair products … and store loyalists often share these discoveries on social media, which draws in more customers. And that’s a crucial part of the equation: making sure customers aren’t just loyal, but also loud. Brands rely on them to spread the word far and wide about great loyalty programs.”

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Loyalty Card: Will Apple Pay, Pay?

Quartz: “Retailers can tie their own loyalty programs into Apple Pay, so that people using the system can rack up points just as they would if paying by cash or a physical credit card. But as of yet, there’s nothing that allows consumers to earn more or different rewards for using Apple Pay specifically.”

“That could change, though, based on a recent job posting for a product manager sought by Apple Pay to ‘develop loyalty products and launch projects with merchants for those products’ … The job post confirms what many industry experts in the payments space have been saying for years: Apple needs to get into the rewards game to make its mobile wallet more appealing to consumers … Apple declined to comment.”

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McDonald’s Ritual = Customer Loyalty

The Washington Post: “Surely there are plenty of customers who have traded up from the fast-food standbys for pricier offerings from fast-casual restaurants that they perceive as healthier and fresher. But now that we’re deeper into the fast-casual boom and consumers have adjusted to this new restaurant landscape, it’s worth noting that they tend to stay exclusively in one dining lane.”

“So if Taco Bell, for example, were to slip into a rough patch, it seems more likely that those dollars are being lost to another fast-food player — not Chipotle. And as Chipotle aims to pull out of the sales spiral it has been in since some of its restaurants were closed because of e. coli contamination, it might be better off not trying to emulate Taco Bell’s new breakfast menu, but instead trying to win over the people getting lunch at Panera.”

“McDonald’s still dwarfs the other brands in terms of overall foot traffic, and its customers have very little overlap with other chains … McDonald’s customers also tend to be more loyal than any others in the industry, preferring to stick with the Golden Arches as a ritual instead of bouncing around different chains.”

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Chipotle ‘Loyalists’ Are Most Unforgiving

The Wall Street Journal: “Foursquare Inc. analyzed traffic data from its location-sharing mobile apps and found that Chipotle’s most loyal customers have been less forgiving of the chain than infrequent visitors. Last summer, 20% of Chipotle customers made up about half of foot-traffic visits.”

Says Foursquare CEO Jeff Glueck: “Interestingly, it’s this group of faithful customers that have changed their Chipotle eating habits most dramatically … These once-reliable visitors were actually 50% more likely to stay away in the fall during the outbreak, and they have been even harder to lure back in … Losing 2–3 loyal customers is the equivalent of losing about 10 other customers.”

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