Purchase Brands vs. Usage Brands

Harvard Business Review: “Where traditional brands focus on positioning their brands in the minds of their customers, digital brands focus on positioning their brands in the lives of their customers. Furthermore, they engage customers more as users than as buyers, shifting their investments from pre-purchase promotion and sales to post-purchase renewal and advocacy.”

“Purchase brands focus on creating demand to buy the product, while usage brands focus on creating demand for the use of the product … Purchase brands emphasize promotion; usage brands emphasize advocacy … Purchase brands worry about what they say to customers; usage brands worry about what customers say to each other … Purchase brands try to shape what people think about the brand along the path to purchase; usage brands influence how people experience the brand at every touchpoint.”

“The simple view would be that traditional brands are purchase brands and digital brands are usage brands. But there are exceptions, including brands like Visa, FedEx, Lego, and Costco, which exhibit many of the characteristics of usage brands … They think of customers less as one-time buyers and more as users or members with an ongoing relationship … Purchase brands focus on the ‘moments of truth’ that happen before the transaction, such as researching, shopping, and buying the product. By contrast, usage brands focus on the moments of truth that happen after the transaction, whether in delivery, service, education, or sharing.”

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Why Do Pizza Chains Attract Republicans?

Morning Consult: “Large pizza chains accounted for 36.5% of sales in states that President Donald Trump won in 2016, compared to 23% of sales in states that voted for Hillary Clinton … Pizza industry experts suggest the popularity of major chains in traditionally conservative states — and to some extent, price and the level of more premium toppings — could be reasons for the political divide.”

A theory: “While pizza was plentiful in Italian immigrants’ urban communities along the East Coast around the turn of the 20th century, it was sparse elsewhere in the United States. It wasn’t until the late 1950s and early 1960s, when companies like Pizza Hut, Domino’s and Little Caesars cropped up in the Midwest, that pizza was brought to the wider American public. During the industry’s early years, when chains were starting, companies focused their marketing on lower-income neighborhoods and presented pizza as an inexpensive dinner option in those Midwestern hubs.”

Carol Helstosky, author of Pizza: A Global History, comments: “If we think about this in culinary terms, the emphasis is on cost, reliability, standardization and efficiency … Food historians might label these culinary values conservative, in the sense that the consumer wants the same product, and qualities like fast delivery matter more than particular ingredients or the overall taste.”

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Should iPhone ‘Addiction’ Be ‘Cured’?

Farhad Manjoo: “Tech ‘addiction’ is a topic of rising national concern. I put the A-word in quotes because the precise pull that our phones exert over us isn’t the same as that of drugs or alcohol. The issue isn’t really new, either; researchers who study how we use digital technology have for years been warning of its potential negative effects on our cognition, psyche and well-being.”

“With a single update to its operating system and its app store, Apple could curb some of the worst excesses in how apps monitor and notify you to keep you hooked (as it has done, for instance, by allowing ad blockers in its mobile devices). And because other smartphone makers tend to copy Apple’s best inventions, whatever it did to curb our dependence on our phones would be widely emulated … For starters, Apple could give people a lot more feedback about how they’re using their devices. Imagine if, once a week, your phone gave you a report on how you spent your time, similar to how your activity tracker tells you how sedentary you were last week.”

“Another idea is to let you impose more fine-grained controls over notifications. Today, when you let an app send you mobile alerts, it’s usually an all-or-nothing proposition — you say yes to letting it buzz you, and suddenly it’s buzzing you all the time … Done right, a full-fledged campaign pushing the benefits of a more deliberative approach to tech wouldn’t come off as self-interest, but in keeping with Apple’s best vision of itself — as a company that looks out for the interests of humanity in an otherwise cold and sometimes inhumane industry.”

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Sam’s Club: Ardent Shoppers Feel Jilted

The New York Times: “Walmart’s quiet shuttering of 63 Sam’s Club stores on Thursday — hours after trumpeting its plans to raise wages — sent shock waves through the ardent customer base of the membership-only chain. Patrons protested with unusual passion not granted to the thousands of closings recently announced by other retailers.”

“On social media, some shoppers reminisced about sharing frozen yogurt with their great-grandmother at the local Sam’s Club, while others fretted about remote areas losing a primary source of supplies or a reliable place to pick up prescriptions.”

Bethany Pope Hopp, a mother of five, comments: “Having a store like Sam’s Club is absolutely a necessity for some of us rural, smaller communities. That and Walmart are all we have — we don’t live in an area where there’s a Costco or a Target on every corner.” Dharmendra Singh, whose Sam’s Club was among those closed, laments: “It’s like a long-term girlfriend leaving you and not even giving you a call.”

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Retailers Miss Mark With ‘Targeted’ Emails

The Wall Street Journal: “Traditional retailers were once pioneers of using data to zero in on what customers want. But as the importance of their catalogs and mailings have been overtaken by email and other online media, they have struggled—sometimes to the frustration of their customers.”

Brendan Witcher of Forrester comments: “Nearly 90% of organizations say they are focused on personalizing customer experiences, yet only 40% of shoppers say that information they get from retailers is relevant to their tastes and interests. The ugly truth is that most retailers haven’t done the (hard) work of understanding how to use the data.”

“At no time is that more evident than during the year-end shopping bonanza, when retailers deluge customers with messages. During last year’s holiday season, retail emails increased 15% compared with the rest of the year, but shoppers opened 15% fewer of them, according to a study of eight billion messages by marketing-services firm Yes Lifecycle Marketing.”

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The Un-Store: Can’t Buy Me Gloves

Quartz: “The idea that a brick-and-mortar store would lack actual, purchasable merchandise seems like a gamble … But more retailers are beginning to embrace the ‘un-store,’ which is a retail space that doesn’t actually stock products for sale. By eschewing the traditional sales-based model for one that focuses on customer engagement, product education, and services, the shopping experience becomes less about the bottom line, and more about top-line brand engagement and loyalty-building.”

“When people visit Samsung 837, they’re in a comfortable environment where they can relax without feeling the pressure of a sales associate encouraging them to buy something. They’re therefore free to spend more time learning about the products and interacting with them, which boosts their connection to the brand and their understanding of its wares … those interactions can give the retailer more valuable information than money can buy. For example, they can use the data generated during a store visit to determine if a particular campaign is working, or if there is more interest in a one product versus another.”

“This past October, department-store retailer Nordstrom launched its own un-store concept with Nordstrom Local, a 3,000-square-foot, service-driven space in Los Angeles’ West Hollywood district … Here, the focus is on convenience … they offer services such as personal styling, on-site alterations, in-store pick up, returns, manicures and, of course, coffee, drinks, and wine.”

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Wegmansmania: Bigger than the Beatles?

The Wall Street Journal: “Across the U.S., grand openings of specialty grocery chains such as Whole Foods Market, Stew Leonard’s and Wegmans Food Markets Inc. are attracting customer hordes … By 7 a.m., roughly 2,000 people had swarmed a shopping center in Hanover, N.J., to mark the arrival one Sunday this summer of a Wegmans and its exotic cheeses and hen-of-the-woods mushrooms.” Robin W. Dente, community-affairs coordinator for the township comments: “It reminded me of when the Beatles came to America.”

“Wegmans, which has drawn lines of loyal ‘Wegmaniacs’ to opening days since at least the 1950s, doesn’t give out freebies to woo shoppers at dawn, according to the company.” However: “As part of its multibillion-dollar expansion, the German discount grocer Aldi Inc. is running multiday openings with tastings of chocolate truffles and imported brie—and a chance to win produce for a year.” Meanwhile: Stew Leonard’s, a Connecticut-based chain known for holding Christie Brinkley wine tastings and other celebrity events, has dialed down a bit.”

“Before it entered Long Island last year, it hit local media and attended a village pumpkin festival and other events, handing out 100,000 $5-off coupons. Then, more than 20,000 people showed up at its Farmingdale store the first day, and the crush clogged the aisles … The company reassessed its approach. For the debut of a second Long Island store in August, it invited local politicians for a party but kept the grand opening pared down, said Stew Leonard Jr., the chain’s CEO,” who says: “We’ve gone from a thunder to a rain philosophy.”

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V8 & Mr Peanut: Iconic Brands No More?

YouGov BrandIndex: “Two of the most well-known legacy supermarket products — V8 Vegetable Juice and Planters Peanuts — show significant declines in multiple consumer perception metrics over the long-term … From 2013 through the present, both of these brands have suffered their own distinct issues, and one big shared one: millennials.”

“Both V8 and Planters Peanuts are seeing their levels steadily eroding over the past four years, almost entirely brought down by millennials. 94% of all consumers were aware of V8 in January 2013, slipping down to its current 85%. Planters took a steeper drop of 17 percentage points, dropping from 95% down to 78% over the same time period … Millennials change the picture entirely, especially for Planters Peanuts: V8 is down 14 percentage points (from 86% awareness to 72%) with the younger crowd, and Planters Peanuts sees a 32 percentage point fall (from 83% awareness to 51%).”

“V8’s Value and Quality perception with overall consumers has also been falling steadily since 2013. Except in this case, instead of millennials, adults 50 and over dominate the growing negative numbers behind these two metrics, perhaps having been priced out of purchasing the vegetable juice. Consequently, Purchase Consideration by boomers of V8 has declined as well: the juice went from 43% of adults 50 and over considering buying V8 the next time they were purchasing a beverage to 33% now.”

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Airbnb Antidote: Hotels Take Aim At ‘Self-Worth’

The New York Times: “With competitors like Airbnb nipping at their heels, hotels are rolling out experiences to their most faithful customers that go far beyond extra nights and room upgrades. Want to improve your cooking skills? How about a class with a Michelin-starred chef? Or snorkeling in Hawaii with Jean-Michel Cousteau? Or basketball tips from the N.B.A. standout Dwyane Wade? … In offering such exclusive experiences, hotels are looking to establish deeper connections with their customers in the face of growing competition from start-ups.”

“Marriott is trying to differentiate itself by focusing on self-improvement activities, in part because its own research suggests this is how people will increasingly spend their money when traveling … Such experiences not only increased travelers’ self-worth and satisfaction, the research found, but travelers sought to share the interactions with experts on their social channels.”

“The large hotel brands are mindful that right over their shoulder, Airbnb, in particular, is reinventing what travelers expect from a local stay by introducing smaller-scale experiences and classes, which people can bid on through its site even if they are not staying in an Airbnb rental. One in Paris, for example, offers to teach patrons how to sculpt a head from clay, taught by an artist who studied at the Louvre museum. Another offers a class in San Francisco on creating a French macaron.”

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How Whole Foods Steals Walmart Shoppers

Business Insider: “When Amazon’s acquisition of Whole Foods formally went through in August, the e-commerce giant immediately made some changes — most notably, significant price cuts … The biggest source of foot traffic for Whole Foods were regular Walmart shoppers. People who visited Walmart at least twice a month accounted for 24% of new Whole Foods customers the week of the price cuts.”

“Across the board, the customers who defected to Whole Foods from grocery rivals were wealthier than the retailers’ average shopper … Walmart’s regular customers’ average income is $59,264, according to Thasos data; the average income of a regular Walmart customer that is defecting to Whole Foods, however, is $71,697 … While Walmart has aimed for more aspirational customers as Whole Foods cuts prices, Thasos data proves that both retailers are competing for the same shopper: the upper-middle class customer who is increasingly important as wages stagnate for much of the US.”

“All of this means that wealthier shoppers are increasingly influential, forcing bargain-centric retailers like Walmart to expand into more aspirational brands … Walmart is gearing up to cash in on wealthier customers, especially as it expands its e-commerce lines. Whole Foods winning over high-income customers could force Walmart on the offensive in this battle — one that both retailers are determined to win.”

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