Hospitals ‘Tiptoe’ into Grocery Business

The Wall Street Journal: “Invoking the mantra that food is medicine, hospitals across the country are taking measures to prevent and treat illness through diet. To nudge patients into eating well at home, they have opened food pantries that offer nutrition counseling and healthful fare. They are growing their own produce, adding farmers to the payroll and hosting greenmarkets. A few are even tiptoeing into the grocery business.”

“ProMedica, a not-for-profit health system headquartered in Toledo, Ohio … set up two food pantries, where patients can receive nutritional guidance and free groceries. ProMedica opened a grocery store a few miles from one hospital, in an area that had been bereft of healthful food. Called Market on the Green, the store is open to the public, not just ProMedica patients.”

“Most grocery-store checkout counters are a gauntlet of candy. At Market on the Green, cashiers are surrounded by produce, while candy bars are tucked down an aisle. Whole-grain cereal is shelved at eye level, sugar-laden cereal can be found on harder-to-reach shelves … The store is a nonprofit enterprise (and) tries to steer shoppers with prices, putting smaller markups on healthful fare. For instance … whole-grain chips cost less than regular ones. Chocolate milk is ‘priced high’ to encourage children to drink skim milk.”

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Locked Out: A Biometric Brouhaha

The Wall Street Journal: “The rise of facial-recognition technology such as Microsoft Corp.’s Windows Hello and Apple Inc.’s Face ID means computers now seem to be passing judgment on users’ appearances. When a face doesn’t measure up, people are left to ponder whether they look their best, whether they use too much makeup, why they changed their hairstyle—and perhaps whether they even look like themselves. Users report their devices won’t unlock unless they wear the same makeup as when they set it up. Others complain it can’t identify them in the morning when they first tilt phone to face on the pillow. Men who shave their beards say their phones suddenly treat them like a passing stranger.”

“Windows Hello aims to balance security with usability, said Dave Bossio, a Microsoft program manager. An algorithm uses the infrared camera on laptops and other devices to create a mathematical model based on facial ‘landmarks’ like the eyes, nose and mouth. Makeup, glasses, beards, lighting and other factors can affect the system, and widening the range of acceptability too much creates a security risk, he said.”

“To avoid the makeup problem, Apple’s engineers designed a camera system that projects 30,000 infrared dots across a user’s face to create a 3-D model stored on the phone, according to people familiar with the project. Apple said the chances the iPhone X could be unlocked by a random person’s face are one in a million.”

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Seltzer Hackers Pop SodaStream’s Bubble

The Wall Street Journal: “SodaStream’s popular countertop machines helped lower the cost of sparkling water by allowing users to make their own. For a hard-core group of fizzy-water fans, it’s still not cheap enough … In an effort to save more on each pour, these customers are hacking into their SodaStream machines by attaching their own canisters of carbon dioxide, often purchased at welding-supply or paintball stores … These gambits allow the hackers to avoid the roughly $15 fee the company charges for refill gas canisters—which fit into the back of the machine and can carbonate 60 1-liter bottles of water.”

“The practice of SodaStream hacking has become so popular that a small cottage industry has sprung up to support it. Vendors sell special adapters to support unofficial carbon dioxide canisters on the SodaStream, while others offer to refill the SodaStream canisters in ads on Craigslist and Facebook … In one popular video, the poster points to a 5-pound aluminum carbon dioxide tank and says, ‘You can steal these from landfills pretty much anywhere’… Israel-based SodaStream International Ltd. discourages the hacking and said tampering with the gas canisters violates its terms of service. It added it isn’t responsible for any ‘bodily harm that could be caused by misuse’.”

“Deviant Ollam, 42, of Seattle, said he bought a special adapter that allows him to attach a 20-pound carbon dioxide tank directly to his SodaStream machine … He said he purchased ‘food grade’ carbon dioxide from his local gas-supply store, which some SodaStream customers consider to be safer than the grade of carbon dioxide welders use. For him, the appeal is less about saving a few cents than using his wits to get ahead. His family is drinking far more sparkling water than they did before, just because they can, he said. ‘Why drink regular water again when you can have the ‘I’m sticking it to the man’ feeling?’ Mr. Ollam said.”

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Bar Moxy Debuts Soft-Serve Vending Machine

The Wall Street Journal: “Make way for soft-serve vending machines … Bar Moxy, an all-day dining and drinking spot located in Midtown’s Moxy Times Square hotel, is unveiling such a machine this week—the first of its kind in New York City, according to the hospitality company Tao Group, which manages the hotel’s food and beverage operations.”

“The vending machine, which accepts credit cards, cash and Apple Pay, offers two flavors: vanilla with a spicy boost from Mike’s Hot Honey, a chile-infused sweetener, and dairy-free chocolate … The technology for dispensing soft-serve from a vending machine is fairly straightforward: Users make their selections from a video display, then wait less than a minute for the order to be processed and delivered through a small opening at the front of the machine. A spoon pops out of another opening.”

“Tao Group managing partner Matt Strauss won’t say how much the company spent for the ice-cream machine. But Rich Koehl, vice president of Stoelting Foodservice, the device’s Wisconsin-based manufacturer, said its list price is $68,000 .. Tao Group must sell a few hundred servings each month to cover costs, including for the ice cream, which it makes using its own recipe, Mr. Strauss said. The machine’s real value, he added, could come from the buzz it generates, potentially driving more customer traffic to Bar Moxy as a result.”

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Lego is Letting Go of Plastics

The New York Times: “Lego faces a more complex problem than other consumer businesses — for this Danish company, plastics are not the packaging, they are the product …. Lego emits about a million tons of carbon dioxide each year, about three-quarters of which comes from the raw materials that go into its factories, according to Tim Brooks, the company’s vice president for environmental responsibility.”

“Lego is taking a two-pronged approach to reducing the amount of pollution it causes. For one, it wants to keep all of its packaging out of landfills by 2025 by eliminating things like plastic bags inside its cardboard packaging … It is also pushing for the plastic in its toys to come from sources like plant fibers or recycled bottles by 2030. The problem with that target, though, is that virtually all of the plastic used worldwide — including that molded by Lego into toy bricks — is created from petroleum.”

“Company researchers have already experimented with around 200 alternatives … Most test materials, both bio-based and recycled, have so far fallen short. Some bricks made with the new materials have broken, leaving sharp edges that could injure a child, or have popped out with ugly, muddied colors. Others have on occasion produced misshapen or pockmarked bricks … The search for a substitute for petroleum-based plastic could yet take years of work … Still, executives argue that, as a company that models itself as a de facto educator as much as a profitable enterprise, it has little option but to keep trying.”

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Applestone ‘Butchers’ The Vending Machine

Quartz: “It’s midnight and you need a steak. What do you do? If you live near Stone Ridge or Accord, New York, you just head to the nearest Applestone Meat Co. 24-hour butcher shop. You won’t find a bleary-eyed staff of overnight shifters working though. A row of vending machines, organized by type of meat—beef, pork, lamb, sausages, and ground meat—stand ready, stocked with steaks, chops, and burgers-to-be.”

“Applestone … envisioned the system as way to reach more customers, and make the shopping process more seamless. It’s more for busy families, less about the ability to get grass-fed burgers in the middle of the night—though that would be an excellent use of them, as well … That said, anyone who wants a smile with their ribeye can purchase meat from a customer service window at the Stone Ridge store from 11am to 6pm daily. Customer service, it turns out, isn’t totally dead.”

“Vending machines are a national obsession in Japan, where they sell pretty much everything imaginable, and ramen dispensers popped up in San Francisco earlier this year. And the French have oyster vending machines.”

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Wigle Room: ‘Terroirist’ Whiskey

The New York Times: Wigle Whiskey is “a craft distillery with a reputation for off-the-wall experimentation. On a recent afternoon, Meredith Meyer Grelli, one of its owners, showed off its latest offering: three small flasks of rye whiskey, identical save for the words Saskatchewan, Minnesota or Pennsylvania — the sources of the grain used to make it.”

“Other than the grains, each whiskey is made the same way. And yet each tastes subtly different: The Saskatchewan whiskey is smooth and nutty, the Minnesota a bit earthy, the Pennsylvania fiery and fruity. Initial chemical analysis, Ms. Grelli said, supports those impressions: The Pennsylvania rye, for example, had elevated levels of ethyl acetate, which imparts flavors like pear and bananas. Those differences, Ms. Grelli said, indicate that spirits like whiskey can have something that the distilling world has long dismissed: a sense of place, drawn from the soil and climate where the grains grow and the whiskey is made — in other words, terroir.”

“Wigle’s whiskey trio, called the Terroir Project, goes on sale this fall in select markets and is among the first in a wave of place-specific spirits — whiskey, vodka, rum and others — coming out over the next few years. The producers range from small, regional distillers to global names like Belvedere, the Polish vodka owned by LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton. The new spirits are part of an international movement by distillers, plant breeders and academic researchers to return distilling to what they see as its locally grounded, agricultural roots.”

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Puy du Fou: Something to ‘Crow’ About

The New York Times: “Puy du Fou, a historical theme park in the Loire region about four hours from Paris, has trained six crows to pick up cigarette butts and bits of trash and dump them in a box … The theme park’s owners would rather have humans properly dispose of their own candy wrappers and cigarettes. The crows are part of an educational campaign to prompt the ecologically minded to take their rubbish with them. ‘We want to educate people not to throw their garbage on the ground,’ said Nicolas de Villiers, the president of Puy du Fou.”

“Christophe Gaborit, who manages the theme park’s Academy of Falconry, trained the six rooks, which are members of the crow family and were raised at Puy du Fou, the second-largest theme park in France. (Disneyland Paris is No. 1.) … Each morning, he brings his crows and a set of wooden boxes to the park’s entrance so visitors can see the feathered creatures in action, Mr. de Villiers said. The crow’s task is simple. Each box has two compartments, and when a crow deposits a piece of paper or trash in a slot, a drawer is opened to reveal a treat — bird food, mostly.”

“But while it may seem like work to humans, the birds are at play. Crows are intelligent and need mental puzzles to stay alert and well adjusted, said John Marzluff, a professor of wildlife science at the University of Washington … the experiment at Puy du Fou raises the question: Could Mr. de Villiers’s staff of 40 falconers teach pigeons to tidy up Paris and New York? No, he said. ‘Pigeons are not very smart’.”

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Craft Beer Lightens Up

The Wall Street Journal: “While mega breweries flaunt puny carb counts, microbrew fans tend to assume that ‘lite’ means flavorless. Lately, however, craft brewing has been quietly losing weight, squeezing into macro-brew territory with beers as low in alcohol and calories as mass-made lagers—only deceptively, defiantly flavorful. Small-scale breweries have, historically, produced big, bold brews … But a strange thing happened in 2007 when Dogfish Head Brewery released Festina Peche, a slightly sour, peach-infused wheat that barely tipped the scales at 4.5% ABV and 8 IBUs (International Bittering Units): It sold.”

“While Dogfish still sells truckloads of crushers such as 120 Minute IPA, the brewery’s SeaQuench Ale, a 4.9% gose released in 2016, has been the fastest-growing beer in the company’s history … Lagunitas and other breweries like them are retooling accordingly. Yes, Lagunitas, makers of boozy bruisers like aptly named Maximus (8.1% ABV) and Hop Stoopid (8% ABV) is releasing light beer … Tuning down their brews shifted Dogfish Head‘s source of inspiration, too, from American hop fields to the European grain belt.”

For “Dogfish Head’s latest light beer, Grisette About It! (3.5% ABV and under 100 calories) … the brewers chose grisette, an old-timey French wheat-beer style. To emphasize its grainy character without carb-loading, they used a low-sugar, 17th-century oat variety from Columbia, S.C., granary Anson Mills, along with malted wheat and a little honey.”

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Study: Inclusion Begets Innovation

The Wall Street Journal: “Companies that welcome ideas from all employees have better growth prospects than those with a less-inclusive approach to innovation, a new study finds … Employees were asked how often they were included in larger, strategic decisions, whether they felt management was interested in their ideas and whether they were encouraged to try new approaches to their work. It found that companies where more people said they felt their ideas were sought out and valued tended to yield more revenue growth and employee productivity.”

“The analysis—which split companies into three tiers based on how many employees said they got opportunities to innovate—found workers at firms in the most inclusive group were 14% more likely to say they want to stay at their company long term than those in the least inclusive group. Those employees were also 32% more likely to describe themselves as willing to put extra effort into work, compared with the least-inclusive group.”

“At Quicken Loans Inc. … employees are given four hours each week of focused “bullet time.” During those hours, they are able to step away from day-to-day responsibilities and explore new skills and parts of the company’s business not directly related to their own work, said Quicken Loans CEO Jay Farner … Wegmans Food Markets Inc., a family-owned regional grocery chain with 48,000 employees, says it has ‘innovation teams’ made up of frontline workers in Wegmans grocery stores and employees in the company’s main office. These teams come up with new programs and improvements that are tested at select stores with the prospect of being applied companywide.”

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