JC Penney To Display Dresses Like Oreos

The Dallas Morning News: “What does a $2.49 package of Oreo cookies have to do with a $24.99 colorful summer dress? … A prominent display of Oreos in the supermarket includes pictures of the cookies, maybe with milk, and a discounted price in big print. Then there’s a rack of cookies right there. If you had to hunt down the Oreos, you might forget about them.”

At Penney’s, a “rack of dresses will be right behind the mannequins where shoppers can find them. Plus there’s a big sign with the price.”

“We’re making it as easy as possible to buy the dress,” says JC Penney CMO Mary Beth West, who “spent most of her career in the consumer packaged goods business devising ways to get us to spend billions of dollars on brands such as Ritz, Philadelphia, Nabisco, Kraft Mac & Cheese, Jell-O and Cool Whip.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Main & Vine: New Kroger Format Emphasizes ‘Community’

Seattle Times: A new, small-format Kroger store in Gig Harbor, WA, combines quality produce (like Whole Foods) and lower prices (like Trader Joe’s) but most of all is positioned as “not just as a grocery store but as a community hub, where local products are prominently displayed, community involvement is highlighted and people can hang out in the store’s two-level cafe area.”

“In the ‘brew and blend’ cafe area, beers including those from Gig Harbor’s 7 Seas Brewing are on tap, and coffee from Gig Harbor’s Cutters Point Coffee is served. Customers can eat sitting at tables and chairs or can people watch from lounge chairs on the upper level.”

“Local and regional wines and beers are arrayed prominently in the adult-beverage section, Gig Harbor’s Artondale Farm has its own stand for soaps and lotions, local artists painted the murals on the walls, and a product display features a small wooden boat built by Gig Harbor BoatShop … The name came from what the company wanted the brand to represent, with ‘Main’ evoking the Main Street of a community and ‘Vine’ conveying green and fresh.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Whole Foods: New Limits on Local Store Autonomy

The Wall Street Journal: “Whole Foods is shifting more responsibility for buying packaged foods, detergents and other nonperishable items for the more than 430 stores to its Austin, Texas, headquarters. It is deploying software to simplify labor-intensive tasks like scheduling staff and replenishing shelves … The measures are part of a broader push to beat back competition from retailers such as Kroger Co. and Costco Wholesale Corp. that have expanded their range of natural and organic products, and frequently offer them at lower prices.”

Co-CEO John Mackey: “We want to evolve the structure in such a way that we take out redundancy and waste, and at the same time though, we’re not diminishing the culture, the empowerment efforts that make Whole Foods Market special.”

“The relative autonomy Whole Foods has long granted its stores and regional units—now 12—reflects a bedrock principle of Mr. Mackey, who helped open the first Whole Foods in 1980 … The model worked well for Whole Foods for years as it grew rapidly and established itself as the leading retailer of natural and organic groceries … But the need to offer more competitive prices is stepping up the pressure for greater efficiency.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Where Groceries Thrive

Fortune: An online startup called Thrive is attempting “to offer natural and organic goods at the price of the conventional non-organic equivalent … Thrive prices products to only cover the company’s costs to fulfill and ship, instead making the bulk of its money through a subscription model. The company charges a $60 membership fee, pegged to the cost of a Costco membership.”

“It’s Whole Foods-type products at Costco-like prices,” says co-CEO Nick Green. Thrive sells only non-perishables. “It’s where no one else wants to play,” Green says. “Fresh food is a blood bath right now. We said, let’s look at the part of the grocery that really shouldn’t be in the grocery store.” Thrive launched about two years ago and now has “about 150,000 members.” “We can’t scale the infrastructure fast enough to service the demand,” Green says.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail