App-etite for Munchery

Bloomberg Business: “Munchery is one of dozens of technology startups around the world trying to solve the challenge of mealtime planning with the tap of an app. GrubHub in the U.S., Just Eat in Europe, and Ele.me in China, to name just a few, all connect Internet users with restaurants and their takeout menus. Critics derisively call the proliferation of these businesses the “lazy food economy,” but Munchery is different. It cooks and delivers its own relatively healthy fare.”

“The company is in four cities—San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, and Seattle—operating industrial kitchens in each. One recent afternoon in San Francisco, chefs and their assistants, wearing white caps and long-sleeved smocks, toiled over trays of grilled salmon atop brown rice with edamame and sweet carrots ($10.99) and pork belly buns with hoisin sauce, shredded cabbage, and pickled daikon ($10.95) … After they’re prepared, the dishes are chilled in refrigerated rooms, packed in compostable boxes, and loaded into cars for delivery. Customers heat them up for about two minutes in a microwave or 10 to 20 in an oven.”

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Americans Are Loving Bowls

“Sales of bowls are rising as Americans prefer more casual, one-course meals that layer flavors,” The Wall Street Journal reports. Tableware makers are reconfiguring place settings. Restaurants are overhauling their china cabinets. Consumers are increasingly cradling their food while perched at kitchen islands, lounging on sofas or multi-tasking at a table.”

“The trend began as a way to make healthy entrees more appealing. If eggs and vegetables are piled into a bowl rather than on a plate, the diner is less likely to mourn the missing bread.” Juliet Boghossian of Foodology comments: “You’re taking away all the carbs, like toast, muffins and potatoes, but you don’t see the empty space on the plate.” Designer Ree Drummond adds: “A bowl is much more flexible and open to interpretation compared to a plate.”

Rebecca Proctor of Aurora Brands says: “The rise of the bowl is really evidence of the shift in our lifestyle from more formal to casual.”

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