He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Waiter

The Wall Street Journal: “In a new study … researchers wanted to find out whether a restaurant server’s body-mass index … influenced what diners chose to consume. Trained students working on the research team observed 497 interactions among diners and servers in 60 casual American full-service restaurants, such as Applebee’s. In each case, the observers estimated whether the server and the diners had a BMI of more or less than 25, the standard cutoff for being overweight. The result: ‘If you have a heavy server … you order more’.”

“What accounts for this finding? The scientists can only speculate” but suggest that “diners with a heavier server felt freer to order more fattening items.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Don’t Let Them Eat Cake

Some restaurants now charge a “cakeage” fee to patrons who bring their own celebratory cake, reports The New York Times. At some restaurants the fee is as much as $14 per person. Some patrons are outraged, but so are some of the chefs, who think that bringing a supermarket cake into their restaurants is an “abomination.”

At WD-50 in New York, the pastry chef “didn’t want anyone in the dining room to see it and think it was coming out of his kitchen.” At Miller Union in Atlanta, owner Neal McCarthy complains: “These people sought out a nice restaurant, yet they undermine it by bringing in the world’s most hideous cakes.”

However, Vinny Accardi of Room 55 in Queens, New York takes a more accommodating view: “It’s a restaurant and it’s the hospitality industry,” he says. “The whole goal is to make people have a good time.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Like Amazon for Your Diet

“Research increasingly suggests that each of us is unique in the way we absorb and metabolize nutrients,” reports The New York Times. “This dawning realization has scientists and entrepreneurs scrambling to provide more effective nutritional advice based on such distinguishing factors as genetic makeup, gut bacteria, body type and chemical exposures.”

Dr. Eran Elinav of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel “found a startling variation in the glucose responses of 800 subjects fed the same foods … By combining data gleaned from subjects’ glucose responses with information about their gut bacteria, medications, family histories and lifestyles, the scientists devised an algorithm that accurately predicted blood sugar responses to foods the participants hadn’t yet eaten in the study.”

“The algorithm is similar to what Amazon uses to tell you which books you want to read,” says Eran Segal, also of Weizmann and a co-author of the study. “We just do it with food.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

App-etite for Munchery

Bloomberg Business: “Munchery is one of dozens of technology startups around the world trying to solve the challenge of mealtime planning with the tap of an app. GrubHub in the U.S., Just Eat in Europe, and Ele.me in China, to name just a few, all connect Internet users with restaurants and their takeout menus. Critics derisively call the proliferation of these businesses the “lazy food economy,” but Munchery is different. It cooks and delivers its own relatively healthy fare.”

“The company is in four cities—San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, and Seattle—operating industrial kitchens in each. One recent afternoon in San Francisco, chefs and their assistants, wearing white caps and long-sleeved smocks, toiled over trays of grilled salmon atop brown rice with edamame and sweet carrots ($10.99) and pork belly buns with hoisin sauce, shredded cabbage, and pickled daikon ($10.95) … After they’re prepared, the dishes are chilled in refrigerated rooms, packed in compostable boxes, and loaded into cars for delivery. Customers heat them up for about two minutes in a microwave or 10 to 20 in an oven.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Americans Are Loving Bowls

“Sales of bowls are rising as Americans prefer more casual, one-course meals that layer flavors,” The Wall Street Journal reports. Tableware makers are reconfiguring place settings. Restaurants are overhauling their china cabinets. Consumers are increasingly cradling their food while perched at kitchen islands, lounging on sofas or multi-tasking at a table.”

“The trend began as a way to make healthy entrees more appealing. If eggs and vegetables are piled into a bowl rather than on a plate, the diner is less likely to mourn the missing bread.” Juliet Boghossian of Foodology comments: “You’re taking away all the carbs, like toast, muffins and potatoes, but you don’t see the empty space on the plate.” Designer Ree Drummond adds: “A bowl is much more flexible and open to interpretation compared to a plate.”

Rebecca Proctor of Aurora Brands says: “The rise of the bowl is really evidence of the shift in our lifestyle from more formal to casual.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail