Future Sausage: Fruit Salami?

Quartz: “Swiss product designer Carolien Niebling was not a sausage fan, at least not until she spent three years tasting 50 to 70 different types of sausages from all over the world. She took everything she learned to create what she calls ‘the future sausage.’ Among her futuristic sausage collection, you can find the fruit salami, a dried sausage made of berries, dates and almonds. Or there’s insect pâté, a sausage made with insect flour and a tonka-bean infusion.”

“Niebling’s goal is not only to create new types of sausages with less meat in them, but also to use her designs as a message to encourage people to expand their palates. She believes the rise of supermarkets has distanced people from the natural production of food. As a result, the only food many consider ‘edible’ is the food they see on a supermarket shelf.”

“Though Niebling used substitutes to reduce the meat content of her future sausages, she says she’s not interested in using vegetables to mimic the taste of meat. On the contrary, she hates the idea of faking meat.” She comments: “What I’m trying to say with my design is that changing your diet doesn’t have to be, ‘instead of meat, you eat carrots.’ There’s so much else out there. There are hundreds of different grains, there are so many plants and flowers that we haven’t fully explored yet.”

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The Ikea Recipe Series

Fast Company: “The Ikea Recipe Series … is a collection of posters that you can use to cook your dinner–literally. The posters serve as both a recipe sheet and a cooking wrapper for meals that range from salmon to cobbler to ravioli with meatballs.”

“Each recipe resembles a paint by numbers sketch. Rather than list the ingredients as a long string of text, you’ll see circles in which you sprinkle a tablespoon of salt or a half teaspoon of pepper, and outlines of proteins where you can place the salmon. All of this is drawn with food-safe ink on parchment paper … all you do is roll up the paper and toss the dish into the oven.”

“The recipes are all created with components from Ikea’s own frozen foods available for purchase at its stores … parchment paper traps in moisture as food bakes, making it a forgiving and flavorful way to cook that requires no skills with a sauté pan. It’s also clean. Just toss the wad of paper into the garbage at the end of the meal, and the dishes are done. And perhaps most importantly of all, the Recipe Series looks fun, like an adult coloring book that you can eat.”

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$13 Burgers Slows Demand for Fast Food

The Wall Street Journal “As the number of outlets serving ‘better’ burgers—featuring nontraditional toppings and artisan buns—has skyrocketed over the past decade, so has the average burger tab, turning some customers off … Lunch traffic to quick-serve hamburger restaurants fell 5% last year—the biggest year-over-year decline that market-research firm NPD Group Inc. has recorded … The average lunch burger check—including fries and a beverage—has risen 22% since the financial crisis to $5.83, with a 4% increase last year alone, according to NPD.”

“With so much competition and only so many ways to differentiate a burger, upstarts have been coming out with evermore gourmet ingredients, such as Wagyu beef, roasted garlic aioli and truffled arugula, which have raised the bar for burgers overall—and their price tag …they can beef up profits by charging extra for additional toppings … A basic hamburger at (Fatburger) starts at $5.94, but after adding bacon and chili, it is $8.14. With fries and a drink, the combo totals $13.37.”

McDonald’s recently adopted a back-to-basics approach after years of chasing health-minded customers with products such as salads, sandwich wraps and fruit smoothies. It had neglected its burgers and recently found that only one in five millennials had ever tried its signature Big Mac … The burger giant has been trying to improve the quality of its burgers by adjusting temperatures and cook times to deliver hotter, fresher burgers. Next year, it plans to make its Quarter Pounders with fresh, instead of frozen, beef. It is also in the process of rolling out higher-end, customizable burgers from a ‘Signature Crafted’ menu to compete with the ‘better’ burger places, but at a much lower price.”

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Seaweed Cups: Food as Packaging

The New York Times: “A growing number of entrepreneurs and researchers are working to turn foods like mushrooms, kelp, milk and tomato peels into edible — if not always palatable — replacements for plastics, coatings and other packaging materials.” For example: “The United States Department of Agriculture … has developed a material from milk protein that can be used to line pizza boxes, encase cheese or create, say, soluble soup packets that can simply be dropped in hot water. The product could even serve as a substitute for the sugar used to coat cereal flakes to prevent them from going soggy too fast.”

“Over the past several years, governments have quietly bankrolled efforts to develop packaging from food. The European Union, which underwrote a project to develop coatings from whey and potato proteins from 2011 to 2015, estimates that the global market for so-called bioplastics is growing by as much as 30 percent each year.”
However: “Nestlé says it wouldn’t want its demand for packaging to reduce the food supply, given widespread hunger … Few, however, are begging to eat the peels left after tomatoes are processed. A group of researchers in Italy has used them to develop a lining for cans.”

“A British start-up called Skipping Rocks Lab is taking matters into its own hands. The company has developed a packaging it calls Ohoo from edible seaweed, and is building a machine to produce containers from Ohoo to hold water, juices, cosmetics and other liquids on the spot. A juice bar, for instance, could create a container with each order.”

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Ikea Incubator: Flat-Pack Food?

Quartz: “IKEA announced it is starting an innovation incubator program, in which it has invited start-up companies to apply to spend three months in one of the company’s labs in Sweden. The benefits? Companies will get €20,000 ($22,400), three months of free housing, and access to IKEA’s prototype shop, a test lab, and hands-on access to the expertise of scientists working in the lab.”

“The Swedish maker of at-home-assembly furniture wants to focus the resources of its incubator on eight key areas: Food innovation, disruptive technologies, customer experience, disruptive design, sustainability, manufacturing, the supply chain, and analytics.”

“For food, in particular, the company is eager to work with startups looking to make waves in urban farming, using virtual reality to do food tastings, the invention of new ingredients, sustainable sourcing, conservation efforts, and healthier eating.”

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Not SeeFood: App Apes ‘Shazam for Food’

The Verge: “In a peculiar case of life imitating art imitating life, Pinterest has announced a new recipe-finding feature that makes use of computer vision to tell you about a dish when you point your smartphone camera at it … It sounds an awful lot like SeeFood, the fake ‘Shazam for food’ app from the HBO comedy Silicon Valley. Pinterest, of course, doesn’t use that terminology anywhere, nor does its marketing material even reference the sitcom or its ludicrous parody, which manifested itself as an app that could only tell you whether an object was or was not a hotdog.”

“When reached for comment regarding SeeFood, a Pinterest representative confirmed to The Verge that the Silicon Valley episode was ‘separate and completely coincidental’.”

“This is all part of a broader artificial intelligence push in the tech industry to apply machine learning techniques to everyday life. By training neural networks on huge mounds of data and translating that into a real-time algorithm, tech giants like Google, Facebook, and Microsoft are now developing software products that can digest and understand the world, from text to photos to even videos.”

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Split Decision: Bezos Goes Bananas

The Wall Street Journal: “It started with a brainstorm from founder and CEO Jeff Bezos that Amazon should offer everyone near its headquarters—not just employees—healthy, eco-friendly snacks as a public service. After considering oranges, Amazon picked bananas, and opened its first Community Banana Stand in late 2015. It has since expanded to two stands on its corporate campus, which sprawls across several blocks in downtown Seattle, and says it has given out more than 1.7 million free bananas.”

“The response has been split. Most Amazonians like them. Other workers say it is now hard to find bananas in stock at nearby grocery stores. And some eateries in a two-block radius of the stands are feeling squished.”

“Amazon has traditionally been more frugal with its perks than other tech companies, which offer dry cleaning, haircuts, cold-brew coffee, nap pods and in-house yoga classes, among other things … Most visitors take two. Others take close to a dozen, claiming they have hungry co-workers—never, of course, that they hanker to bake banana bread after work. Some post photos on Instagram feeding the bananas to their dogs. The stand offers dog treats for four-legged friends.”

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Of Puppuccinos & Peanut Butter Bacon Burgers

The Wall Street Journal: “For some restaurant customers, the hottest items to order aren’t on the menu. In recent years, so-called secret menus have cropped up on social media and attracted a cult following. Devotees proudly photograph their McDonald’s Chicken Cordon Bleu McMuffins, Chipotle Quesaritos (a quesadilla-wrapped burrito) and Shake Shack Peanut Butter Bacon Burgers. Fans debate recipes and discuss how to order tricky items without provoking the ire of harried restaurant staff.”

“Some restaurants, like McDonald’s, deny the existence of such menus, although others say their staff will customize orders. Some establishments actually embrace the concept. Many creations are suggested and named by consumers, who detail online what ingredients to request. Sometimes, people put them together on their own.”

“Occasionally, secret menus aren’t limited to restaurants’ human clientele. Last year, Ricky Wolfe and his then-girlfriend, with dog Wally in tow, drove through a Starbucks in College Park, Md. She ordered a coffee and a Puppuccino. The barista, no questions asked, handed over a tiny cup filled with whipped cream. Mr. Wolfe, 28, was incredulous. Wally, a shepherd-hound mix, was apprehensive until her tongue met the whipped cream.”

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Brand Sagamore: Baltimore Walks The Plank

The Wall Street Journal: “Rising high above the new Sagamore Spirit distillery in South Baltimore is a white water tower with three maroon diamonds on each side, a nod to the jockey silks of the thoroughbred farm that provides the spring water for the company’s rye whiskey. The distillery, which opened a few weeks ago, is the latest endeavor of the growing business empire of Kevin A. Plank, founder and chief executive of the sportswear company Under Armour. His new enterprises — collectively they are called Plank Industries but nearly all have Sagamore in their names — are reshaping Baltimore’s waterfront and restoring luster to Maryland traditions and landmarks.”

“In March, Mr. Plank’s Sagamore Pendry hotel opened not far away in the Recreation Pier building in the Fells Point neighborhood after a roughly $60 million renovation. Outside the hotel, a fleet of new water taxis owned by Mr. Plank and modeled after Chesapeake Bay deadrise boats will soon ferry riders to Port Covington, the industrial South Baltimore waterfront area that is undergoing a $5.5 billion overhaul led by his real estate firm, Sagamore Development.”

“Inside the production center of Sagamore Spirit’s three-building complex in Port Covington, another three-diamond-stamped beacon greets passers-by: a 40-foot copper column still with a mirror finish that is believed to be the first of its kind. Asked why the finish was essential, Brian Treacy, president of Sagamore Spirit, channeled Mr. Plank, a childhood friend. ‘Because it’s all about brand,’ he replied.”

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Keurig Designs Eco-Friendly K-Cup

The Washington Post: “Keurig Green Mountain said it plans by 2020 to change the plastic composition in the billions of K-cup single-serving coffee containers it sells annually, making them more lucrative to recyclers while removing one of the nagging complaints that mountains of the little pods are piling up in landfills … The recycling breakthrough comes as the Keurig’s single-serve coffee machines, which helped revolutionize coffee consumption, are becoming less of a habit after years of growth.”

“The recycling breakthrough comes as the Keurig’s single-serve coffee machines, which helped revolutionize coffee consumption, are becoming less of a habit after years of growth … The problem with K-cups has been twofold. First, they have been too small for the sorting machines to ‘see’ and move to the recycling line instead of the garbage heap. Second, the material composition of the K-cup plastic did not lend itself to being broken down and reused as another material.”

“Many of the 600 or so recycling plants across the United States and Canada have reinvested in technology that can spot the K-cup pods and divert them toward reuse.”
In addition: “Keurig is in the process of changing the makeup of its K-cups from polystyrene to polypropylene.”

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