Serenity Kids: Paleo Baby Food

Quartz: Serenity Kids is “marketing a line of liquid baby food that has the highest meat content of any pouched baby food. It hit the market this month. Meals include liquified uncured bacon with organic kale and butternut squash, chicken with peas and carrots, even beef with kale and sweet potato. The product is sold in packs of six 4-ounce pouches for about $27.”

“As a concept, the diet is comprised of food that would have been available to Paleolithic humans‚ which includes non-processed foods that could be found by foraging or killing animals for meat. That means no dairy, no grains, and definitely no Little Debbie Oatmeal Creme Pies.”

“Designing such a diet for very young children hasn’t come without controversy … Health officials considered it a risk because there was fear children would miss out on important nutrients during a critical stage. Complications down the road could mean poor growth and a weaker immune system, among other things … As of early August, Serenity Kids pre-sold 1,800 pouches. As of now the company is selling the food online, and hopes to be in grocery stores within the next year.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Pizza Al Taglio Doesn’t Cut Corners

The Wall Street Journal: “A number of New York pizza makers are now offering the classic treat with different geometry: Their ‘pies’ aren’t pie-shaped. Instead, they are based on a rectangular-shaped style, known as pizza al taglio, that is popular in Rome. Further distinguishing this version: Slices are often served at room temperature. And when it comes to cutting the pizza, forget about the traditional wheel-style cutter. This is a pizza best divided with a scissors.”

“To some extent, the interest in pizza al taglio speaks to the appetite New Yorkers have for a broadening array of pizza styles, circular or rectangular-shaped. The city has seen restaurants offering everything including Detroit-style pizza and the classic Chicago deep-dish version. And that is not to mention the Sicilian pie, another rectangular style, that has been a mainstay at New York pizzerias for decades.”

“Moreover, other Roman styles are also finding their way to the city. Pinsa Lab, which opened earlier this year in Brooklyn, specializes in an crispy circular style, known as pinsa, that is said to date back to ancient times … But pizza al taglio has special appeal for a host of reasons, say fans. Some like the fanciful toppings that are often used: At Fornino, for example, the pizza al taglio comes in versions with everything from heirloom tomatoes and goat cheese to radicchio and figs.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Blue-Corn Pixza Helps Homeless Kids

Fast Company: “For every five slices of blue corn pizza sold at Pixza, a piece of paper denoting a sixth slice is set aside. Once a week, those slips are counted up, and the corresponding number of slices are made and brought to a nearby homeless shelter, where Pixza representatives–many of them who once lived in the shelter–distribute them to the youth and have a conversation about Pixza’s program, and how it could lead to a job offer at the pizzeria.”

“Next, the youth are set up with a haircut, a shower, a T-shirt, a doctor’s appointment, and a life-skills course; Souza has set up partnerships with local hairdressers, medical students, and doctors who volunteer their services to the program. When the youth make it through all of the steps–their progress is recorded via a bracelet in which each step is hole-punched as it’s completed, like an analogue Fitbit–they are offered a job at Pixza.”

“Once employed at Pixza, the youth are matched up with a dedicated coach, who walks them through life planning and securing necessities like housing … The youth and mentors meet at Pixza during closing hours to plan: how to use the two-month stipend doled out to the kids to help them secure an apartment, how to source furniture, how they might want to direct their career beyond the pizzeria.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Digital Scale Cuts Ikea Food Waste

Fast Company: “By the end of August 2020, Ikea wants to cut its food waste at its stores–both in its restaurants and in its smaller bistros serving cinnamon buns, hot dogs, and soft serve–in half. At the heart of this plan is a digital scale. Whenever employees in Emeryville (CA) toss food waste from the kitchen into a bin, it now records the weight of the food. On a touchscreen mounted on the wall above the bin, employees quickly record what type of food was lost, and see feedback about the cost of that food and the carbon footprint. Over time, the patterns in the data will help the company make changes.”

“Ikea began piloting its new food waste system in 2015, and began rolling it out to stores in December 2016. By May 2017, it had launched in 20% of its stores, reducing nearly 80,000 pounds of food waste and saving the company more than $1 million. It’s now in the process of rolling it out to all of its 400 stores, which serve 650 million customers a year.”

Andrew Shakman, CEO of LeanPath, makers of the digital scale, comments: “The moment you start measuring with technology you begin to change awareness levels and you cause people to start to think differently. Whereas in the past they could just throw something in the garbage, now they have to stop and for a moment; they have to record something about it. In that moment, you’re not just collecting data, you’re communicating your values.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Spotted Cheetah: A Cheetos Restaurant

The Wall Street Journal: “The Spotted Cheetah, a pop-up restaurant specializing in dishes made with Cheetos, has sold out all of the roughly 300 reserved slots for its three-day run, say officials with PepsiCo ’s Frito-Lay division that makes the snack … Spaces were gone within six hours of last week’s announcement of the opening, officials said, adding that there is currently a waiting list of more than 1,000 people should anything become available.”

“The Cheetos restaurant, helmed by celebrity chef Anne Burrell, will feature several varieties of the snack in close to a dozen dishes … Menu items, priced from $8 to $22, include Cheetos meatballs, Cheetos grilled cheese with tomato soup and Cheetos-crusted fried pickles. There are even desserts made with Cheetos, albeit the Sweetos variety of the snack.”

“Ms. Burrell, a fixture on the Food Network, said the challenge was to ‘elevate’ Cheetos, but not get too fanciful. ‘There’s a fine line to walk,’ she said.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Kellogg Story: The Battle of Battle Creek

Bryan Burrough: “If by chance you are reading this over your morning cornflakes, be warned … it turns out that the turn-of-the-last-century origin and evolution of the cereal industry was a very nasty and unpleasant bit of business, as Howard Markel chronicles in The Kelloggs: The Battling Brothers of Battle Creek … Dr. Markel, a professor of medical history at the University of Michigan, tells the story not only of two titans of American commerce and medicine, the brothers John Harvey and William Keith Kellogg, but of the institutions they founded, John’s Battle Creek Sanitarium and Will’s Kellogg cereal colossus—not to mention their long-running feud, one of the more spectacular in the annals of business.”

“Many of John’s patients struggled with the age’s great scourge, ‘dyspepsia,’ a medley of gas, diarrhea, heartburn and upset stomach. An American diet long on animal fat, salt and sugar produced what one historian called ‘the great American stomach ache’ … The Kelloggs (and others) thought that an easily digestible corn cereal might solve all the problems.” However, John “refused to aggressively sell the Kellogg cereal because he thought it unseemly for a medical doctor, and his increasingly famous sanitarium (“the San”), to sell a commercial product.”

Will “made a deal with John to leave the San and start a cereal company of his own, which in time became a global conglomerate. Litigation between the two brothers began almost before the first Corn Flakes box could be shipped from Will’s factory. John sued. Will countersued when John finally sold a cereal of his own. The litigation went on for years, finally ending only in 1920, by which point the damage was irreparable … In the end, the Kellogg brothers’ fortunes reversed. Will, dour and lonely, became one of the country’s wealthiest men … John, though internationally famous well into the 1930s, slowly lost many of his holdings, including, in 1920, the sanitarium itself.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Impossible Burgers: Food is not an App

The New York Times: “One of the chief selling points of the Impossible Burger, a much ballyhooed plant-based burger patty, is its resemblance to meat, right down to the taste and beeflike ‘blood’ …. Now, its secret sauce — soy leghemoglobin, a substance found in nature in the roots of soybean plants that the company makes in its laboratory — has raised regulatory questions. Impossible Foods wants the Food and Drug Administration to confirm that the ingredient is safe to eat. But the agency has expressed concern that it has never been consumed by humans and may be an allergen.”

“Impossible Foods can still sell its burger despite the F.D.A. findings, which did not conclude that soy leghemoglobin was unsafe. The company plans to resubmit its petition to the agency.” Rachel Konrad, a spokeswoman for Impossible Foods, states: “The Impossible Burger is safe. A key ingredient of the Impossible Burger — heme — is an ancient molecule found in every living organism.”

“Impossible Foods is finding out what happens when a fast-moving venture capital business runs headlong into the staid world of government regulation. Investors like Bill Gates and Khosla Ventures have poured money into a variety of so-called alt meat companies. Silicon Valley has noble goals, applying technological solutions to address major issues like climate change, farm animal welfare and food security. But food is not an app. It is far more heavily regulated by governments and much more heavily freighted with cultural and emotional baggage.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Chick-fil-A: Service Trumps Politics

Business Insider: “In a few years, Chick-fil-A has managed to shed its controversial image to appeal to a broader swath of America, all without losing its loyal customers base. Chick-fil-A’s successful expansion north came after its biggest controversy. Dan Cathy, the son of the late Chick-fil-A founder S. Truett Cathy, set off a fury among gay-rights supporters in 2012 that led to nationwide protests after he told the Baptist Press that the company was ‘guilty as charged’ for backing ‘the biblical definition of a family’.”

“These days, Chick-fil-A is warning all its franchisees against speaking out publicly or getting involved in anything that could blur the line between their private beliefs and their public roles as extensions of the Chick-fil-A brand, the company has said … The company still encourages its franchisees to get ‘entrenched’ in their communities … But Chick-fil-A says its focus now — both for local and corporate involvement and philanthropy — is on youth and education causes.”

Also: “Chick-fil-A started modernizing its corporate offices in Atlanta and opened an ‘innovation center’ modeled after the offices of Silicon Valley tech companies … The company hired chefs, food scientists, and dietitians to experiment with new menu items to appeal to upmarket customers who frequent chains like Shake Shack and Panera and are looking for healthier options … Key to Chick-fil-A’s reinvention has been its customer service, which consistently ranks No. 1 in nationwide surveys.” And: The company is investing in its employees. Mark Cohen, a Columbia Business School professor, comments: “Your employees are your ambassadors to the public. The folks who are staffing those Chick-fil-A stores are aggressively reengaging with people and talking about how great the company is.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Meal-Kit Meltdown: DIY Meals Are Cooked

The Wall Street Journal: “The promise of meal kits was to finally make cooking easy enough that Americans would actually do it. Proponents hoped that a cooking revival also could ease the nation’s obesity crisis—a way to reclaim control of what we eat from the big food manufacturers and restaurant chains … the amount of cooking required has apparently been too much, even for the farm-to-table crowd. (So much chopping!) Industry analysts believe that meal-kit purveyors are having trouble retaining customers.”

“The companies are only now starting to acknowledge the truth about the American home cook. Blue Apron recently introduced recipes that are faster to prepare. Amazon and other more recent entrants such as FreshRealm, Gobble and Terra’s Kitchen are going further, dialing back the prep work to almost zero.”

“Americans talk a good game about the importance of home cooking and family meals, but we still want convenience above all. To succeed, meal kits won’t just have to be easier than starting from scratch; they will have to be as easy as takeout.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Aldi Conquers With Cromwell Gin

Business Insider: “The £9.97 Oliver Cromwell London Dry Gin from Aldi won a gold medal at the International Wine and Spirits Competition (IWSC) this week. In doing so, the budget retailer’s gin beat bottles costing up to four times the price in the blind taste test.”

“A spokesperson at the International Spirits Challenge said: “The display of awards achieved by Aldi this year at the International Spirits Challenge was fantastic. They consistently showcased high quality products in the blind tastings, which demonstrates that you don’t have to compromise on price to enjoy great tasting drinks.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail