The Doughnut That Ate Dublin

The Washington Post: “It looked like closing time at the county fair or the week before Christmas at the mall: cars just sitting there, bumper to bumper, waiting their turn to inch along. Dozens of vehicles lined up and down the aisles of the parking lot, honking as if every single driver in front of them was staring at their cellphone while stopped at a green light. It sounded like the traffic jam of the century. But, in fact, it was the Krispy Kreme drive-through at 1:30 a.m. in Dublin — the first to open in the country.”

“Neighbors complained to local government and Krispy Kreme executives that the noise from the doughnut drive-through had kept them awake for days, they told the Irish Times.After just one week, Krispy Kreme had to shut down Dublin’s 24-hour drive-through … Krispy Kreme has been around in the United States since 1937 and has more than 300 locations nationwide. It’s been called a ‘cult’ favorite in the past, inspiring ‘pilgrims’ to ‘pile into the car and drive for hours just to have a couple of Hot Nows,’ as Pittsburgh Post-Gazette writer Marlene Parrish wrote in 2001.”

“But Ireland’s reception appeared to be in a league of its own … As of Friday morning, the Irish Times reported a wait time of 30 minutes for the doughnuts, with metal barriers set up to control the queue like those found at a theme park.”

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Merchants of Honor: Dirty Lemon Trusts its Customers

Anne Kadet: “At the Drug Store, a new shop in Manhattan carrying a single line of soft drinks, the prices are so high—$10 for a 16-ounce bottle—you might be tempted to steal one. And that would be easy enough. At this store, there is no cashier. Not even a payment kiosk. It runs on the honor system. The company behind this store is Dirty Lemon Beverages, a local beverage maker that sells what it markets as health-enhancing drinks directly to customers through text messaging.”

“Chief Executive Officer Zak Normandin says he decided to operate his first store on the honor system because it is the most convenient way to serve customers. ‘No one likes standing in line,’ he said. The Drug Store is a tiny storefront on Church Street in Tribeca, a few blocks south of busy Canal Street. The high-ceilinged space, decorated with old-fashioned black-and-white tile, features a three-door refrigerator case and a 5-foot plant. A digital display mounted on the wall says ‘Grab a bottle and txt us’ followed by the store’s phone number.”

“Mr. Normandin says he isn’t worried about shoplifting at the Drug Store. The shop has cameras and heat sensors to track foot traffic. He said there have been no reports of theft at the store since its opening on Sept. 13.”

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Seltzer Hackers Pop SodaStream’s Bubble

The Wall Street Journal: “SodaStream’s popular countertop machines helped lower the cost of sparkling water by allowing users to make their own. For a hard-core group of fizzy-water fans, it’s still not cheap enough … In an effort to save more on each pour, these customers are hacking into their SodaStream machines by attaching their own canisters of carbon dioxide, often purchased at welding-supply or paintball stores … These gambits allow the hackers to avoid the roughly $15 fee the company charges for refill gas canisters—which fit into the back of the machine and can carbonate 60 1-liter bottles of water.”

“The practice of SodaStream hacking has become so popular that a small cottage industry has sprung up to support it. Vendors sell special adapters to support unofficial carbon dioxide canisters on the SodaStream, while others offer to refill the SodaStream canisters in ads on Craigslist and Facebook … In one popular video, the poster points to a 5-pound aluminum carbon dioxide tank and says, ‘You can steal these from landfills pretty much anywhere’… Israel-based SodaStream International Ltd. discourages the hacking and said tampering with the gas canisters violates its terms of service. It added it isn’t responsible for any ‘bodily harm that could be caused by misuse’.”

“Deviant Ollam, 42, of Seattle, said he bought a special adapter that allows him to attach a 20-pound carbon dioxide tank directly to his SodaStream machine … He said he purchased ‘food grade’ carbon dioxide from his local gas-supply store, which some SodaStream customers consider to be safer than the grade of carbon dioxide welders use. For him, the appeal is less about saving a few cents than using his wits to get ahead. His family is drinking far more sparkling water than they did before, just because they can, he said. ‘Why drink regular water again when you can have the ‘I’m sticking it to the man’ feeling?’ Mr. Ollam said.”

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Bar Moxy Debuts Soft-Serve Vending Machine

The Wall Street Journal: “Make way for soft-serve vending machines … Bar Moxy, an all-day dining and drinking spot located in Midtown’s Moxy Times Square hotel, is unveiling such a machine this week—the first of its kind in New York City, according to the hospitality company Tao Group, which manages the hotel’s food and beverage operations.”

“The vending machine, which accepts credit cards, cash and Apple Pay, offers two flavors: vanilla with a spicy boost from Mike’s Hot Honey, a chile-infused sweetener, and dairy-free chocolate … The technology for dispensing soft-serve from a vending machine is fairly straightforward: Users make their selections from a video display, then wait less than a minute for the order to be processed and delivered through a small opening at the front of the machine. A spoon pops out of another opening.”

“Tao Group managing partner Matt Strauss won’t say how much the company spent for the ice-cream machine. But Rich Koehl, vice president of Stoelting Foodservice, the device’s Wisconsin-based manufacturer, said its list price is $68,000 .. Tao Group must sell a few hundred servings each month to cover costs, including for the ice cream, which it makes using its own recipe, Mr. Strauss said. The machine’s real value, he added, could come from the buzz it generates, potentially driving more customer traffic to Bar Moxy as a result.”

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Consumers are ‘High’ on Seltzer

The Wall Street Journal: “Sparkling water sales are soaring in the U.S. as consumers … ditch soda for healthier, more natural beverages. And with that explosion has come a wave of variants: caffeinated and alcoholic versions, sparkling coconut water and coffee, even seltzer laced with cannabis. Americans will buy an estimated 821 million gallons of sparkling water this year … That is nearly three times as much as 2008.”

“Jess Faulstich, 36, of Los Angeles is so hooked on flavored sparkling water that she takes one to bed in case she’s thirsty during the night. She loves coffee but drinks caffeinated sparkling water to keep her teeth white. A technology trainer by day and a stand-up comedian by night, she gained several pounds in the past year from drinking alcohol at clubs. Now she drinks hard seltzer, when she can find it, because it’s light on alcohol and on calories. ‘I’m surprised my bloodstream is not carbonated,’ she said.”

“Heineken NV, for its part, has a different type of buzz on tap. The company’s Lagunitas brand in July launched an IPA-inspired sparkling water line infused with cannabinoids. Its name: Hi-Fi Hops.”

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The DogHouse: Craft Beer Hotel

Business Insider: “In March 2018, Scottish beer company BrewDog launched a campaign for the “world’s first crowdfunded craft beer hotel,” complete with taps in all the rooms, mini-fridges stocked with beer in the showers, and a spa that uses beer-infused products. Fast forward 17 months later and the 32-room hotel is now inviting guests to ‘the world’s first beer hotel where you can wake up inside a brewery’.”

“While you will sadly not be able to soak in a hot tub filled with IPA, the brewery (called The DogHouse) has been able to make good on the rest of its promises, including in-room taps filled with seasonal BrewDog beer, mini-fridges stocked with beer in every room and shower, and malted barley massages for a vitamin B-rich spa experience … According to Food & Wine, upon entering the hotel, guests will be greeted by a “lobby bartender,” who will hand them a complimentary drink as they check into their rooms.”

“Select rooms will have a wet bar and views of BrewDog’s sour beer facility — and as the name of the hotel implies, you can even book a dog-friendly room and bring your furry friend along for the ride. The lobby will feature games and activities like beer pong, and both guests and visitors to the brewery will be able to check out an “interactive” beer museum.”

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Wigle Room: ‘Terroirist’ Whiskey

The New York Times: Wigle Whiskey is “a craft distillery with a reputation for off-the-wall experimentation. On a recent afternoon, Meredith Meyer Grelli, one of its owners, showed off its latest offering: three small flasks of rye whiskey, identical save for the words Saskatchewan, Minnesota or Pennsylvania — the sources of the grain used to make it.”

“Other than the grains, each whiskey is made the same way. And yet each tastes subtly different: The Saskatchewan whiskey is smooth and nutty, the Minnesota a bit earthy, the Pennsylvania fiery and fruity. Initial chemical analysis, Ms. Grelli said, supports those impressions: The Pennsylvania rye, for example, had elevated levels of ethyl acetate, which imparts flavors like pear and bananas. Those differences, Ms. Grelli said, indicate that spirits like whiskey can have something that the distilling world has long dismissed: a sense of place, drawn from the soil and climate where the grains grow and the whiskey is made — in other words, terroir.”

“Wigle’s whiskey trio, called the Terroir Project, goes on sale this fall in select markets and is among the first in a wave of place-specific spirits — whiskey, vodka, rum and others — coming out over the next few years. The producers range from small, regional distillers to global names like Belvedere, the Polish vodka owned by LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton. The new spirits are part of an international movement by distillers, plant breeders and academic researchers to return distilling to what they see as its locally grounded, agricultural roots.”

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The A5 Ozaki: Lunch as $180 Sandwich Caper

Jason Gay: A $180 steak sandwich is an indefensible purchase. It is a foodstuff strictly for vulgarians, a decadent symbol of 21st-century gluttony and the over-luxurification of everything. To buy it is to wallow in one’s privilege, one’s shameless indifference to the plight of humankind. Other than that, it’s pretty tasty … This $180 Katsu sandwich can be found in lower Manhattan, around the corner from Wall Street, at a hole-in-the-wall establishment called Don Wagyu. Don Wagyu is a spartan place with a small bar counter, a partly-open kitchen and a half-dozen stools. It is visible from the outside thanks to a red neon sign of a cow smoking a cigarette, a nod to the vaguely-illicit goings-on inside.”

“How could a sandwich cost as much as a plane ticket to Florida? This is, after all, the type of thing that makes the rest of the planet think New Yorkers are out of their minds. Was the $180 sandwich (aka the A5 Ozaki) a legitimate food experience or some kind of commentary on late-stage capitalism? … Ordering the A5 Ozaki is not a showy experience. The lights do not dim, the kitchen does not clap; it does not require much more of a wait than a turkey club at a diner. A slice of beef is encrusted with panko, fried, placed on toasted white bread and served quartered, like a preschooler’s PB&J. Nori-sprinkled french fries and a pickle spear are the only accompaniments.”

“But the A5 Ozaki was light and buttery to the point of being almost ethereal, as if the sandwich knew the pressure of delivering on its comical price. Which, of course, it does not. There is no sandwich that is possibly worth $180. But that’s the thrill (and the crime) of extravagance, is it not? Eating this thing felt right and completely wrong—more like a caper than a lunch.”

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Craft Beer Lightens Up

The Wall Street Journal: “While mega breweries flaunt puny carb counts, microbrew fans tend to assume that ‘lite’ means flavorless. Lately, however, craft brewing has been quietly losing weight, squeezing into macro-brew territory with beers as low in alcohol and calories as mass-made lagers—only deceptively, defiantly flavorful. Small-scale breweries have, historically, produced big, bold brews … But a strange thing happened in 2007 when Dogfish Head Brewery released Festina Peche, a slightly sour, peach-infused wheat that barely tipped the scales at 4.5% ABV and 8 IBUs (International Bittering Units): It sold.”

“While Dogfish still sells truckloads of crushers such as 120 Minute IPA, the brewery’s SeaQuench Ale, a 4.9% gose released in 2016, has been the fastest-growing beer in the company’s history … Lagunitas and other breweries like them are retooling accordingly. Yes, Lagunitas, makers of boozy bruisers like aptly named Maximus (8.1% ABV) and Hop Stoopid (8% ABV) is releasing light beer … Tuning down their brews shifted Dogfish Head‘s source of inspiration, too, from American hop fields to the European grain belt.”

For “Dogfish Head’s latest light beer, Grisette About It! (3.5% ABV and under 100 calories) … the brewers chose grisette, an old-timey French wheat-beer style. To emphasize its grainy character without carb-loading, they used a low-sugar, 17th-century oat variety from Columbia, S.C., granary Anson Mills, along with malted wheat and a little honey.”

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