The Beauty of Millennial Fashion

The Wall Street Journal: “Makers of clothes and cosmetics are starting to keep highly sexualized or unrealistic images of women from their advertising in response to pressure from millennial women and their younger counterparts in Generation Z. An ad campaign by New York-based designer Alexander Wang debuting March 5 will show no women’s faces or bodies. Instead, it will display the clothes and what Mr. Wang calls ‘the spirit’ of the women who wear them … Just last fall, his label’s ads included an image of a scantily clad model sprawled atop theater seats with an Alexander Wang handbag between her legs.”

“Even before the #MeToo campaign against sexual harassment, many of the millennial and Generation Z women these brands are courting had been protesting the stereotypical, highly sexualized or unrealistic depictions of women in ads.” Rachel Saunders, of research firm Cassandra, comments: “Part of it is the modern push for gender equality, but also because a super sexualized ad is going to make [the brand] seem uncreative and outdated to them. For young women, buying beauty and fashion products today has less to do with attracting a partner than it did with previous generations. They see it as self-care or being my best self.”

“Before, women opposed to such depictions didn’t have the megaphone of social media, she added. They also had fewer alternatives if they decided to give up a particular brand. However, the internet has shifted the balance in the shopper’s favor, giving her more clothing choices and a voice to influence brands.”

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Tattoo, Ink.

The Wall Street Journal: “While job-hopping is rampant, a surprising number of American workers are expressing a bond with their employers in permanent ink. Employees at such companies as tech’s Red Hat Inc. and sportswear icon Nike Inc. have brand logos plastered on their ankles, shoulders and arms … Like pulling an all-nighter at the office, a company tattoo can signify devotion in a way that impresses colleagues and breeds trust with clients.”

“Paul Bosneag, a manager who works with franchise-holders of the Anytime Fitness gym chain, said he opted for the needle in 2010 as job security. At the time, he said, he recalled thinking, ‘What kind of a jerk would fire an employee that has the logo tattooed on him?’ It turns out Chuck Runyon, chief executive of Anytime Fitness, has fired around seven people who got company tattoos. Performance, he said, is more important than loyalty.”

“Red Hat tech worker Thomas Cameron got reimbursed for his $100 tattoo by filing it as an office supply expense. ‘It’s ink, right?’ he said, ‘and you need ink in the office.’ Mr. Cameron plans another trip to the tattoo shop soon. The company recently announced it was changing its logo.”

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Inman Makes Bricks Fashionable in China

The Wall Street Journal: “In the prospectus for its mammoth 2014 stock listing, Alibaba Group Holding highlighted online-only women’s fashion brand Inman as a success story in China’s e-commerce world … Since mid-2015, Inman founder Fang Jianhua has gone in a surprising direction. He’s abandoned the online-only model to open physical stores. To date, Inman has opened 450 stores, mostly in China’s smaller cities. Last year, while Inman’s online sales rose about 39%, its offline business, which is newer and smaller, grew 300%, to 330 million yuan ($52 million), and reached 35% of total revenue. Mr. Fang expects the online-offline breakdown to be 40%-60% in the future.”

“In changing strategy, Inman had spotted several long-term problems. Online sales growth for brands such as Inman is slowing as China’s e-commerce market becomes more competitive, with megabrands such as Uniqlo, Vero Moda and Gap making big online drives. Meanwhile, the costs of online advertising are rising as are the challenges of standing out in a crowded field.”

“In 2015, Mr. Fang figured it would cost less to reach customers in smaller cities through a physical store than via an online store. Given its years of insight into its millions of customers, Mr. Fang thought Inman could manage its supply chain and stores better than purely brick-and-mortar competitors. For example, women in China’s cold, northeastern rust belt aren’t big fans of Inman’s understated cotton and linen clothes, so no need for stores there.” He comments: “The question is not whether a fashion brand needs to be both online and offline. The question is how big you want to be in the two worlds.”

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Is Gucci Today’s Most Innovative Brand?

From a Wall Street Journal interview with Imran Amed, founder of Business of Fashion: “Without a doubt, the single most innovative brand of the moment is Gucci … Gucci has completely overhauled their e-commerce strategy and changed the way they communicate about the brand. They’ve embraced new channels like Instagram but also done beautiful events and interesting advertising campaigns.”

“They’re not doing any discounting on their main runway collection … We’ve kind of trained the consumer to wait for things to go on sale. Gucci’s stopped that. Fifty percent of their customers are millennials. Millennials are the drivers of success for the fashion industry now. Without engaging them, you can’t really operate a successful business today. Gucci has found ways of engaging with that consumer.”

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Sportsneakers: Performance Shoes Trip Up

Quartz: “As sneakers have grown into the everyday footwear of choice—even in the office—for millions of Americans, performance shoes have been pushed aside by styles that co-opt their looks and comfort but shed their athletic intent … In 2017, sales of performance shoes dropped 10% to $7.4 billion, while sales of sport leisure sneakers grew 17%, reaching $9.6 billion.”

“Some brands have capitalized better than others. While Nike is by far still the king of the US sneaker market, Adidas has made significant gains in the US by delivering the fashionable, athletic-inspired shoes shoppers want. Nike has a deep roster of these styles, but its newer shoes, such as the Epic React Flyknit, still emphasize performance.”

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Adidas Kicks are a Ticket to Ride

City Lab: “Starting January 16, Berlin transit authority BVG will release its own limited edition line of sneakers, a project that’s the first of its kind anywhere in the world. A collaboration with Adidas Originals, the sneakers’ tie-in with the subway will be immediately apparent to any Berliner: the heel counters feature the unmistakable seat upholstery pattern featured on the city’s public transit fleet.”

“The sneaker’s tongue will include a feature that’s arguably more striking—a fabric version of the annual BVG season ticket. That means the wearer gets free travel on subways, trams, buses, and ferries anywhere within Berlin public transit zones A and B— which cover almost all of the city—from January 31st to the end of the year.”

“Then there’s the price, which is a snip at €180 ($215) a pair. That makes them more expensive than the average sneaker, but much cheaper than a traditional annual transit pass, currently €728 ($869) for the same zones.”

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Stinky Cremes: The Odor of Authenticity

The New York Times: “Among skin-care enthusiasts, Biologique Recherche Lotion P50 has a formidable reputation for its exfoliating powers — and an extremely stinky aroma. Formulated decades ago, the French toner contains a hyperspecific blend of lactic acid, onion extract and plankton that loyalists swear will clear up acne and render your skin silky smooth. If you can withstand the assault on your nose, that is.” Danuta Mieloch of Rescue Spas comments: “It’s highly addictive because it helps to achieve healthy, glowing skin. You sort of can’t live without it …Women go to extremes to maintain their skin. A little smell — it’s a small price to pay.”

“P50 is not the only classic beauty product causing a (literal) stink. SkinCeutical’s brightening and firming C E Ferulic serum has a noticeable ‘metallic smell,’ says the New York dermatologist Dr. Dendy Engelman. ‘One of my patients told me it smells like dirty hot dog water’ … The phenomenon represents a sharp departure from fragranced creams and serums from other luxury purveyors … that leave behind a richly perfumed trail with every application. Yet not masking the au naturale aroma of ingredients lends a certain air of authenticity.”

Dr. Amy Wechsler, a New York dermatologist and psychiatrist, comments: “The thinking is that if something stings and smells bad, then it must be doing something … People associate medicine with a bad smell and bitter taste; so with skin care, they think there must be some really active ingredients in there … it’s like, ‘Oooh it’s supposed to smell bad,’ and it feels even more secret and special.”

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Perfumarie: The Nose Knows Retail

The New York Times: Mindy Yang’s Perfumarie in SoHo “specializes in blind perfume shopping, allowing customers to smell fragrances with all the branding removed … In her quest to encourage consumers to trust their noses, Ms. Yang decided to put perfumes on tap, labeling them only by number. She installed 32 identical fragrance spouts along the minimalist back wall of the space, removing any hints of branding, packaging or price information. Underneath each tap is a small gray stone tagine containing a white paper swan soaked in the mystery perfume”

“Customers are encouraged to sniff in numerical order, taking notes on a clipboard about the scents that set their synapses ablaze. The scents begin light, with airy and citrusy notes, and get progressively stronger. Ms. Yang likens this to beginning with white wine and graduating to a full-bodied cabernet. Shoppers are not permitted to know the name of the perfume they’ve selected. Instead, the vials are labeled with numbers, looking a bit like prototypes stolen from a chemistry lab … At the end of every month, Ms. Yang hosts a cocktail party to unveil the tap selections. She also posts the full list online so that customers can discover the truth about the perfumes they took home.”

“When customers pay for their first blind smelling, they have the option to become a Perfumarie Explorer’s Club member. Their scent notes are scanned into a database and saved for future reference … Ms. Yang hopes that by offering membership and stressing the community aspect of the store, customers will return month after month. She wants them to treat their past smelling notes like a library, learning how their taste evolves over time … she hopes it will be equally attractive to the industry as a street-level test lab.” She comments: “I am no longer interested in traditional retail. People need to learn how to be empowered to have a point of view and choose what they like for themselves.”

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What Does Luxury E-Tail Look Like?

The New York Times: “High-end e-commerce remains a bright spot in the shopping landscape: flooded with more cash than ever before and with bubblelike sky-high valuations to boot. It’s a world dominated by two behemoth competitors … Yoox Net-a-Porter, the largest luxury e-tailer by sales, is one of them. It owns the e-tailers Net-a-Porter, the Outnet, Mr Porter and Yoox; it also operates the e-commerce sites for over 30 luxury brands including Stella McCartney, Dolce & Gabbana and Chloé.”

“Farfetch, the other big name, is an online marketplace for 500 independent luxury boutiques and 200 brands as well as the owner of the bricks-and-mortar store Browns in London … Little wonder that during the past year barely a month went by without Yoox Net-a-Porter or Farfetch unveiling a snazzy new strategy or service in a thinly veiled bid to outmaneuver the other. In April, for example, Yoox Net-a-Porter introduced ‘You Try, We Wait’: a same-day try-on-and-wait premium delivery service with at-home shopping consultations. Six days later, Farfetch started a ‘store-to-door service’ in 90 minutes with Gucci in 10 cities worldwide.”

“Then Farfetch revealed a suite of technologies based on responding to consumers in the ‘Store of the Future.’ Yoox Net-a-Porter promptly responded with ‘Next Era’: a partnership with brands that debuted with Valentino giving customers access to Valentino products wherever they are, and however they want them.”

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