Misty Copeland: Ballet Megastar as Megabrand

CNBC: Ballet star Misty Copeland “is one of the few dancers who is business savvy enough to have become a brand of her own. She has performed on Broadway, appeared as a judge on ‘So You Think You Can Dance’ and written a best-selling memoir. She’s picked up endorsement deals with T-Mobile, Seiko, Under Armour, Coach and others — honors usually reserved for high-profile sports figures. In May, she signed on with Dannon to promote its Oikos Greek yogurt.”

“Her next act is a dancewear line ‘for all shapes and sizes’ debuting in August. The inspiration for the line, Egal, stems from her own struggle to find supportive leotards when she was an awkward teen.”

Copeland comments: “Celebrities today make all this money and have all this time to travel and play, go to clubs and get in trouble. But there’s never a moment that a dancer can take off and just be like, woo hoo, I’m enjoying all of the applause that I got in my last show! The work never ends until you retire, and I think that having that structure in place as a classical dancer has really benefited me as a businesswoman.”

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Dress Local: Starbucks Fashion in the ‘Hood

The Washington Post: “Starbucks employees will continue to wear the green or black aprons that you’re used to seeing when you hit up their stores. But lots of subtle changes are coming to what workers can wear underneath. Previously, they could only wear black, white and khaki clothing; now, the palette is more varied and includes other subdued colors such as blue, gray and brown. And they are now permitted to wear patterned shirts.”

“By giving employees more flexibility in how they dress, Starbucks is trying to distinguish itself from other employers with comparable schedules and wages … But the dress code for any retailer is not just a talent strategy: It’s also about telegraphing a certain feeling to customers. And by allowing more personalized attire, Starbucks seems to be doing something that is in keeping with a broader strategic trend in retail these days. Mega-chains across a variety of shopping categories are trying to make individual stores reflect their local neighborhoods.”

“Starbucks workers in Brooklyn will likely embrace the dress code differently than those in Miami or in a small, Midwestern college town. And perhaps that can give each of the chain’s outposts a more varied, localized feel.”

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Zappos: A Short Story About a Long Call

Business Insider: “A Zappos employee recently had a customer service call that lasted 10 hours and 43 minutes, breaking an internal record at the Amazon-owned online retailer … Steven Weinstein answered a call from a customer who needed some help with an order of a few items. The two began to chat, and even after she was helped, she stayed on the line.”

“Weinstein said he only took one break during the nearly 11-hour period, about two-and-a-half hours on, to go to the bathroom. One of his colleagues brought him food and water during the call.”

“At Zappos, call center employees are trained to use interactions with customers as a way to build relationships, not make a sale. And if a call is going long during a particularly busy time, then it’s up to the employee overseeing the call center to assign more people to calls rather than encourage an employee to end a call early. The last longest customer service call was set by Mary Tennant in 2012, at nine hours and 37 minutes.”

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Cover Story: Fashion That’s Fast But Not Loose

The Wall Street Journal: “In India, consumers want their fashion fast, but not so racy. So, for Cover Story—India’s first domestic fast-fashion chain—that often means censoring international looks … Many Indian women aren’t comfortable showing their midriffs, for example, so Cover Story began layering crop tops … Dresses with deep necks were deemed too daring, so the company’s designers added netting along the neckline.”

“Color is another point of difference: Indian consumers tend to favor brighter colors than Western apparel shoppers. When the Cover Story designers saw black, white and gray striped clothes on the runways they swapped out the shades for blue and red.”

“Cover Story plans to bring fresh styles to its shelves every week. It expects to open 100 outlets in the next five years, particularly in smaller towns where consumers are more likely to find the unedited international styles too provocative. Competing global chains say they don’t plan to open even half that number of stores.”

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Luxury: It’s Not What It Used To Be

USA Today: “People around the world who usually flock to luxury goods are worried about events that threaten global stability including terrorism fears, the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union and China’s slowdown. At the same time, luxury retailers are losing share to online sellers, the same issue bedeviling mainstream store chains. They’re also suffering at the hands of discounters and fast-fashion luxury lookalikes.”

Milton Pedraza, CEO of The Luxury Institute, comments: “The story with luxury is it’s just not as a exclusive and it doesn’t justify the price like it used to. Too many of them are discounting and there’s not enough consumer demand.”

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C.O. Bigelow: Retail Magic Since 1838

The New York Times: “At a time when chain drugstores are seemingly colonizing every block of New York City, the family-owned C.O. Bigelow, on the Avenue of the Americas between West Eighth and Ninth Streets, has managed not only to survive but to flourish.”

“The store was opened in 1838 by Dr. Galen Hunter as the Village Apothecary Shop at 102 Sixth Avenue, and he eventually sold it to an employee, Clarence Otis Bigelow, in 1880. Mr. Bigelow moved it two doors north, to the current location in 1902, where the original brass finishes, including the gas chandeliers, are still intact.”

“If you count the original store … C.O. Bigelow claims it is the oldest pharmacy in the United States. It has had a devoted following for much of its existence, and was said to be favored by Mark Twain, Thomas Edison and Eleanor Roosevelt. Today, with an inventory of nearly 500 beauty brands, both mainstream and boutique, it is a destination for beauty-product junkies.”

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Selfridges Stages ‘Refashioned Theater’

The Stage: “London department store Selfridges is to launch a 100-seat theatre that will allow customers to watch a Shakespeare production being rehearsed and performed. The department store has also teamed up with drama school RADA to provide two weeks of workshops and masterclasses for shoppers. Called the Refashioned Theatre, the venue will have a traverse stage, a box office, a designer royal box and a bespoke lighting rig from White Light.”

“The theatre company will offer audiences the chance to watch rehearsals, which Selfridges compared to the experience shoppers get while looking at its own window displays. The play will feature nine actors, plus five “digital cameos”, where digital images will be projected on to mannequins.”

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The New Fashion: Design It Yourself

The New York Times: “Jimmy Choo is planning to unveil its latest innovation: not a new heel height or shape, but a collection of crystal clip-ons, buttons and bracelets that can decorate pumps and clutches and peep-toe ankle-laced stilettos (even slip-on skater shoes) … to luxe up an otherwise simple pair of shoes according to individual desire.”

“This follows the introduction of Gucci DIY stage 2, a service in the brand’s flagship store in Milan that allows customization of jackets, tuxedos, coats and shoes. Then there’s Opening Ceremony’s new ’embroidery station,’ a sewing machine tucked away in the SoHo store where customers can personalize shirts and jackets with patches and graphics. The service will soon expand to hand-painting, airbrushing and hand embroidery.”

“Theoretically there are protections built in to the customization process, in that the options have been approved by the designer and there are advisers on hand … At least when it comes to the Jimmy Choo offering, nothing is irrevocable since everything is removable … Gucci has preselected the places where DIYers can choose to put their desired patch or initials or embroidery, and Carol Lim of Opening Ceremony … mused, ‘If someone wanted to go really crazy and embellish everywhere, would we say, You can’t do that? We haven’t so far’.”

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LaCroix: Seltzer as Lifestyle Brand

Vox: “LaCroix isn’t the only brand to benefit from the sparkling water boom. But it’s the one that’s risen to the coveted status of lifestyle brand … The secret behind LaCroix’s rise is a mix of old-fashioned business strategy and cutting-edge social marketing. When Americans wanted carbonated water, LaCroix was positioned to give them them fizzy water. Then, sometimes by accident, LaCroix developed fans among mommy bloggers, Paleo eaters, and Los Angeles writers who together pushed LaCroix into the zeitgeist.”

“About five years ago, LaCroix spotted an opportunity. The downfall of soda was creating a craving for sparkling water … Dieters kicking soda and alcohol were among the first LaCroix devotees, happy to find something with a little more flavor … First came coconut, followed apricot, mango, and tangerine … Offering 20 flavors gives LaCroix the ability to profit from ubiquity while keeping the cachet of scarcity. Most stores don’t carry every flavor, so stocking up on a favorite can require some persistence.”

“LaCroix has become more than just a popular sparkling water. It’s become part of the story people tell about who they are. The internet bursts with ways for LaCroix devotees … to declare their loyalty. You can buy a T-shirt for $25 that says … LACROIXS OVER BOYS … This is the crux of LaCroix’s success: People will spend far more than a case of its cans cost to tell the world how much they love LaCroix … LaCroix has populated its own Instagram with photos taken by its followers — a cascade of pretty, laughing people; stacks of pastel LaCroix cases; and gorgeous, minimalist still lifes with artfully placed seltzer cans.”

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