FAO Flagship To Return to NYC

The Wall Street Journal: “A dominant presence in Midtown Manhattan for decades before its closure in 2015, FAO Schwarz is coming to life again with a new, 20,000-square-foot Rockefeller Center location, set to open in November. ThreeSixty Group Inc., a California-based firm, acquired the retail brand from Toys ‘R’ Us in October 2016 for an undisclosed price … But in an era when bricks-and-mortar retailers struggle to stay competitive as consumers increasingly go online for their shopping needs, FAO is making its Rockefeller Center location as much about the experience as the buying.”

“That means the store won’t just be staffed with traditional sales clerks, but also product demonstrators, magicians and men and women playing various costumed roles, including toy soldiers … the company is going so far as to hold auditions, rather than just the standard interviews, for retail staff.”

“Ultimately, ThreeSixty Brands may not be looking to make a profit on the Rockefeller Center store so much as use it to promote the FAO name, said Jed Wexler, a retail expert who runs 818 Agency, a New York firm. ‘It feels like an advertising play,’ he said. In any case, the New York store, which will be considered the FAO flagship, is part of a larger push. ThreeSixty Brands is also launching a smaller store at LaGuardia Airport this fall and one in China in 2019.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Lucy Sparrow’s Felt Supermarket

Boing Boing: “UK artist Lucy Sparrow is back with a new shopping opportunity for lovers of her fantastic felt products. Until August 31, at The Standard hotel in downtown Los Angeles, Sparrow is showing her most ambitious exhibit yet: the Sparrow Mart Supermarket. This is her fifth and largest all-felt installation (it features 31,000 handmade products) and her first West Coast one.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Hamptons: Where Filling Up is a Gas

The Wall Street Journal: “Stuart Markus is a full-time musician with one of the wackiest gigs around. Most summer weekends, he plays for the Maserati and Ferrari crowd at Gas Hampton … owner Sergio Celikoyar hired the musician as part of an effort to pry people out of their cars and over to his convenience store to spend a little more money. His aim is to create an aesthetic that screams Hamptons, not roadside pit stop.”

“Mr. Markus … gets paid by the owner about $150 for a three-hour performance, plus tips. Those can be as much as $20 a car. His filling-station set list includes Jackson Browne’s ‘Running on Empty,’ America’s ‘Ventura Highway,’ Simon & Garfunkel’s ‘America,’ and—not surprisingly, given the crowd— Jimmy Buffett. One woman walked up to him recently on her way to the convenience store and asked if he played any ‘Jesus music.’ He played the first song that came to mind, ‘Amazing Grace.’ She tipped him $20.”

Celikoyar also “hired a local muralist to decorate the store as a beach, with surfboards, palm trees, sailboats and a lighthouse. Painted circus tents lead to the bathroom, which is so clean it drew praise from reality-television star Bethenny Frankel. She tweeted it was the ‘nicest gas station bathroom I’ve ever seen’ … On some summer weekends, when Mr. Markus isn’t singing, the owner pays a local magician to do card, coin and rope tricks. ”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Disney Tries ‘Dynamic’ Pricing

The Wall Street Journal: “After raising some ticket prices for its theme parks by more than 20% over the past five years, Walt Disney Co. will set a new benchmark this week when it offers die-hard fans the chance to attend a six-hour preview of a new attraction at Disneyland—for $299. Even for fans used to high prices, the $50-an-hour sneak peek at Pixar Pier on Friday, a day before the attraction officially opens, breaks new ground.”

“Raising prices—currently around $100 on average days and more than $120 during ‘peak’ times around holidays—could mitigate tourist appetite and increase Disney’s profits. The company, however, is wary of appearing to gouge customers, according to theme-park executives and analysts, and going against founder Walt Disney’s vision of affordable family entertainment.”

“Disney parks executives are working on adopting a dynamic pricing model similar to airlines, in which prices fluctuate depending on when a ticket is purchased, this person said. Disney already has introduced a limited version of dynamic pricing to its parks, charging a range of prices based on three categories of dates: ‘value,’ ‘regular’ and ‘peak.’ Prices range from $97 to $135 for Disneyland and between $102 and $122 for Walt Disney World.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Kanye Tests Bite-Sized Music

The Wall Street Journal: “Kanye West is betting that good things can come from small packages. The 41-year-old rapper has produced five albums, each with seven tracks, many under three minutes. Released on consecutive Fridays, mostly by his record label, G.O.O.D. Music, and its partner Def Jam Recordings, the minialbums are making waves in a music industry where bigger has increasingly been seen as better … G.O.O.D. Music’s experiment is the latest instance of labels and artists tinkering with release strategies in the streaming age. Streaming is now the most popular way Americans listen to music. As listening habits change, record executives and musicians are trying to figure out how to reach fans and distinguish their releases in an increasingly crowded market.”

“Similar to how Mr. West’s provocative tweets and interviews in recent months helped him break through the clutter of social media ahead of his new releases, his seven-track albums are generating buzz for G.O.O.D. Music, music-industry experts say … It’s too soon to tell if shorter albums will trump longer ones in the streaming world … Bite-sized LPs may go down smoother for music fans inundated each week not just with music, but movies, videogames and social-media.”

“Mr. West hasn’t detailed his strategy, but he hints at the idea of shorter tracks on 4th Dimension, a 2½-minute song on Kids See Ghosts. The track samples Someday, by gospel singer Shirley Ann Lee, which includes the lines ‘you only want 2½ minutes if you can get it…three minutes maximum’ and ‘when it get too many then they can’t remember it and then they lose interest’.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Slow Tickets: Swift ‘Reputation’ for Empty Seats

The Wall Street Journal: “The biggest pop star’s current concert tour isn’t a sellout. And that’s a good thing, according to some in the concert industry. Taylor Swift’s ‘Reputation’ tour, which kicked off last week in Glendale, Ariz., is a test case in squeezing out scalpers and capturing more profits from ticket sales. The strategy … is to use aggressive pricing to limit the ability of scalpers to purchase tickets and later sell them at higher prices. In addition, a program from Ticketmaster is aimed at giving passionate fans earlier access to tickets at discounted prices.”

“One downside to the plan: empty seats at some of the roughly 36 stadiums on Ms. Swift’s 53-date tour. However, even if those seats remain unsold, the ‘Reputation’ tour already has grossed more on its North American leg than Ms. Swift’s previous tour in 2015 … For decades, artists and their teams have claimed ‘sold out’ shows as a badge of honor showing the high demand for their music. The new approach is raising questions in the music industry about whether an end is nearing for the days of instant sellouts.”

“The best seats—some with added VIP perks—cost $800 to $1,500 at face value for a given show, with those immediately behind them at $250 each. Spots in the back of the house go for about $50.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Short Edition: The Literary Vending Macine

The New York Times: “Short Edition, a French community publisher of short-form literature, has installed more than 30 story dispensers in the United States in the past year to deliver fiction at the push of a button at restaurants and universities, government offices and transportation hubs. Francis Ford Coppola, the film director and winemaker, liked the idea so much that he invested in the company and placed a dispenser at his Cafe Zoetrope in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco. Last month public libraries in four cities — Philadelphia; Akron, Ohio; Wichita, Kan.; and Columbia, S.C. — announced they would be installing them too. There is one on the campus at Penn State. A few can be found in downtown West Palm Beach, Fla. And Short Edition plans to announce more, including at Los Angeles International Airport.”

“Here’s how a dispenser works: It is shaped like a cylinder with three buttons on top indicating a “one minute,” “three minute” or “five minute” story. (That’s how long it takes to read.) When a button is pushed, a short story is printed, unfurled on a long strip of paper. The stories are free. They are retrieved from a computer catalog of more than 100,000 original submissions by writers whose work has been evaluated by Short Edition’s judges, and transmitted over a mobile network. Offerings can be tailored to specific interests: children’s fiction, romance, even holiday-themed tales.”

“Short Edition, which is based in Grenoble and was founded by publishing executives, set up its first kiosk in 2016 and has 150 machines worldwide … The dispensers cost $9,200 plus an additional $190 per month for content and software. The only thing that needs to be replaced is paper. The printed stories have a double life, shared an average of 2.1 times.” Kristan Leroy of Short Edition comments: “The idea is to make people happy. There is too much doom and gloom today.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Music Deluge: Is More Less?

The Wall Street Journal: “It has never been easier to listen to vast quantities of music, discover new artists and create, distribute and promote your own tunes. But there’s a downside: It is harder for artists to break through the cacophony of today’s global pop-music machine. And some fans, already struggling to keep up with television, social media and other entertainment, are feeling overwhelmed.”

“The amount of music released globally in 2017 is roughly seven times the amount released in 1960, according to data from Discogs.com, a user-generated database of physical recordings. Nearly 150,000 new albums saw at least one physical or digital sale in the U.S. last year, according to Nielsen. While older Nielsen figures aren’t comparable due to data issues, they show the number of new albums rising from 36,000 in 2000 to about 77,000 in 2011.”

“Not long ago, record labels operated on a less-is-more strategy, seeking to avoid cannibalizing an artist’s album sales by putting out yet another one too soon. In the CD era, the costs of producing and distributing each album made it important to make higher-grossing albums to ensure profits. With streaming, those costs aren’t as high, and labels have a greater incentive to own, release and re-release more music … Mark Mulligan, a music-industry analyst at MIDiA Research, says distributors are making money based on quantity, not quality.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Mastodon: The Anti-Facebook?

The Washington Post: “Mastodon, a Twitter-like social network has had a massive spike in sign-ups … As the #DeleteFacebook movement has gained steam, people are registering for Mastodon at four times the rate that they normally do, according to Eugen Rochko, the service’s creator. Between Monday and Tuesday alone, Mastodon gained about 5,800 new users … That’s more new registrations than what Mastodon typically sees over an entire week.”

“For a social network — Mastodon has 1.1 million users to Facebook’s 2.2 billion — that may not sound very impressive. But what makes Mastodon increasingly attractive, particularly in a post-#DeleteFacebook world, is its attitude toward data and control … Mastodon’s code is open-source, meaning anybody can inspect its design. It’s distributed, meaning that it doesn’t run in some data center controlled by corporate executives but instead is run by its own users who set up independent servers. And its development costs are paid for by online donations, rather than through the marketing of users’ personal information.”

“Rooted in the idea that it doesn’t benefit consumers to depend on centralized commercial platforms sucking up users’ personal information, these entrepreneurs believe they can restore a bit of the magic from the Internet’s earlier days — back when everything was open and interoperable, not siloed and commercialized.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Roxie: It’s Dog Day at the Movies

The New York Times: “Charlie, an 18-month-old Yorkie-cairn terrier mix, was one of many first-timers at the Roxie Theater in San Francisco on Monday night. The theater was holding a sneak preview of Wes Anderson’s new film, ‘Isle of Dogs,’ with a particularly appropriate twist — the screening was B.Y.O.D., or Bring Your Own Dog … Outside the sold-out event, pups posed for photographs on a red carpet before heading into the 234-seat theater to find their spot.” Isabel Fondevila of the Roxie comments: “Dogs get the seats. And we have a lint roller ready for after.”

“The stop-motion film, opening nationwide on Friday, is set in the fictional Japanese city of Megasaki, where all the dogs have been banished to a dump called Trash Island.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail