Simple Products Beget Simple Packages

The Wall Street Journal: “Instead of burying ingredient lists in the fine print on the back of the package, food manufacturers are trumpeting simpler formulas prominently on the label’s front … More people care deeply about what’s in their food and insist on recognizing the ingredients. The litmus test for many consumers is whether those ingredients might appear in their own kitchen cupboards.”

“Simply Tostitos Organic Blue Corn Tortilla Chips boast only three ingredients: blue corn, organic expeller-pressed sunflower oil and sea salt. This past June, General Mills Inc.’s Larabar snack bar line launched Larabar Bites. The bites—available in flavors such as double chocolate brownie and cherry chocolate chip—resemble truffles and contain few ingredients which are prominently displayed on the front of the package.”

“New ads for Haagen-Dazs ice cream in major cities such as New York and Los Angeles show a spoonful of vanilla ice cream. ‘5 ingredients, one incredible indulgence’ read ads, which also list the recipe of cream, milk, sugar, eggs and vanilla … This fall, ConAgra’s Bertolli Frozen Meals is rolling out a new, reformulated line of meals that feature a shorter ingredient list that reads more like a recipe.”

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Longevity Market: Boomer Brands Booming

The New York Times: Some companies “are plugging into a wealthy slice of the over-50 demographic called the longevity market, whose annual economic activity currently amounts to $7.6 trillion … With an estimated 74.9 million baby boomers … the biggest market opportunity for start-ups is older Americans rather than hip millennials … The staggering size of the total longevity economy — bigger even than Japan’s — has been attracting more entrepreneurs, deep-pocketed financiers and places to pitch new ideas in the past few years.”

“New business ideas that cater to boomers are nearly endless … and include chefs, online dating sites and yoga instructors for people with health issues … Even businesses with decidedly mundane products are finding ways to capture the longevity niche. Foot care, for example, is a huge market … One of the founders of the Rockport Company, Bruce R. Katz, reinvented himself in 2013 by starting the Samuel Hubbard Shoe Company to sell comfortable footwear to baby boomer men.”

“In a validation of the brand’s appeal to baby boomers, former President Bill Clinton, who turns 70 this month, was even photographed walking a dog, wearing Samuel Hubbard’s sky blue shoes.”

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Five Stars: Hospital Hospitality

The New York Times: “While clinical care is the focus of any medical center, hospitals have many incentives to move toward hotel-inspired features, services and staff training. Medical researchers say such amenities can improve health outcomes by reducing stress and anxiety among patients, while private rooms can cut down on the transfer of disease.”

“But a big driver of the trend may be hospitals’ interest in marketing — attracting patients with private insurance who have a choice in where they receive care, and encouraging word-of-mouth recommendations … Competing on the amenities is all the more important … because there is so little reliable comparative data on hospitals’ medical outcomes.”

“At Henry Ford West Bloomfield, scores from federally mandated surveys show that the evolving features at the hospital have helped to improve its customer satisfaction ratings and make patients more likely to recommend the hospital to others … Indeed, a study by Deloitte found that hospitals with higher patient experience ratings were generally more profitable than those with lower scores.”

“Of course, all these new features and services come with a price tag — part of which is billed directly to patients.”

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Saltwater Brewery: Edible 6-Pack Rings

Quartz: “Saltwater Brewery has introduced new, eco-friendly six-pack rings for their beer … The grain-based rings are both biodegradable and edible—so rather than choking on them, marine life can safely chow down on them instead.”

“The brewery makes the rings by shipping grain leftover from its beer-making process offsite. The grain is then bound with biopolymer, a protein occurring in living organisms, and pressed into shape … While the spent-grain compound isn’t super nutritious for sea creatures, it’s not harmful in any way.”

“The switch to biodegradable rings was costly for Saltwater Brewery … Currently, consumers have to pay about 10 cents more per beer for the technology. Right now the brewery offers a mix of plastic rings and the new biodegradable rings … In coming months, the brewery hopes to shift completely over to edible rings. The brewery also plans to make the biopolymer technology blueprint available for purchase, so that other beverage companies can stop using plastic rings, too.”

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Speaking Geek: The Rise of Nerds & Brands

The Economist: “Today there are more reasons than ever to treat nerds with respect: never mind the fact that every company is clamouring to hire them, geeks are starting to shape markets for new products and services … From personal computers to social-media companies like Twitter and Facebook, many gadgets and platforms started out with curious tech enthusiasts experimenting in their garage or dorm room, only to turn into mainstream hits.”

“But nerds’ influence now goes well beyond technology. They hold greater cultural sway. ‘Silicon Valley’, a show on HBO which will soon start filming its fourth season, presents the “brogrammer” startup culture in all its grit and glory, and suggests that mass audiences are transfixed by what really happens behind closed (garage) doors … Each month at least 70m people play “League of Legends”, a complex multiplayer online game; that is more than play baseball, softball or tennis worldwide.”

“Incumbent businesses, too, have started to take their cue from all this nerdiness. Brands like Mountain Dew and Doritos have sponsored video-game competitions and ‘rodeos’ where competitors race drones around stadiums … But if they try too hard to speak geek, large companies will come off as inauthentic and alienating, exactly what they were trying not to be. Nerds may be a powerful commercial force, but many of them harbour disdain for big brands and overt marketing. Firms will have to try hard to send a cool, coded message.”

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Cover Story: Fashion That’s Fast But Not Loose

The Wall Street Journal: “In India, consumers want their fashion fast, but not so racy. So, for Cover Story—India’s first domestic fast-fashion chain—that often means censoring international looks … Many Indian women aren’t comfortable showing their midriffs, for example, so Cover Story began layering crop tops … Dresses with deep necks were deemed too daring, so the company’s designers added netting along the neckline.”

“Color is another point of difference: Indian consumers tend to favor brighter colors than Western apparel shoppers. When the Cover Story designers saw black, white and gray striped clothes on the runways they swapped out the shades for blue and red.”

“Cover Story plans to bring fresh styles to its shelves every week. It expects to open 100 outlets in the next five years, particularly in smaller towns where consumers are more likely to find the unedited international styles too provocative. Competing global chains say they don’t plan to open even half that number of stores.”

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Cultural Evolution: Nintendo Goes With Partnerships

The New York Times: “Nintendo — which took an early lead in mobile gaming and then proceeded to blow it — offers a lesson in how corporate cultures can make or break a company, especially those that are pioneers in a field … If Nintendo is easily likened to Apple for its autocratic insistence on groundbreaking innovation, it is also like Xerox in that it has failed to take advantage of ideas as valuable as the mouse.”

“Pokémon Go, this month’s gaming phenomenon, came about only because Nintendo has gone years without a hit and was forced to find partners … Pokémon Go demonstrates that Nintendo’s stable of characters … can form the basis for others to develop lucrative mobile games. But that would turn Nintendo into a different kind of company — one … that is content to hit singles and doubles rather than swing for the fences.”

“Nintendo has shown before that it can adapt. It got its start making playing cards in 1889. By the 1970s it was designing video games, leading to the release of the Donkey Kong video game machine in 1981 … In 1983, it added a modem port to the home video game console that would eventually become the popular Nintendo Entertainment System, decades ahead of a time when Xbox and PlayStation gamers connect with one another around the world.”

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Theater as Retail: El Ateneo Grand Splendid

Boredpanda: “Tucked away in Barrio Norte, Buenos Aires is a beautiful bookshop called El Ateneo Grand Splendid … which currently welcomes over one million visitors each year … It is built within the almost 100-year-old Grand Splendid Theater, which opened in 1919.”

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