New Study: Creativity Across Cultures

Fast Company reports on a study of creativity across cultures by Crispin Porter + Bogusky London and Vlad Glaveanu, an associate professor at Aalborg University’s International Center for the Cultural Psychology of Creativity in Denmark (link).

“In response to the statement, “creativity matters for professional life,” agreement peaked in Turkey (88%) followed by China (80%), India (79%), Brazil (78.3%), and the U.S. (76.2%). Meanwhile, respondents from Russia (59.8%), Germany (58%), and the U.K. (57.8%) were more reserved about the role of creativity in the workplace.”

“The finding that CP+B London CEO Richard Pinder found most surprising was the dominant emphasis on the creative individual rather than creative collaboration found primarily in the U.S. (75.2%) and China (72%), a finding which belies China’s collectivist heritage.”

“Another finding was around overall support for the idea that people are more creative when they work together. Agreement with this statement peaks in India (81%), followed by the U.S. (75.3%), Brazil (74.3%), and Turkey (71%).”

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Vegan Seats: What’s Next In Luxury Cars?

The Wall Street Journal: “Interior styling, of which seating is the cornerstone, is the second most cited reason why a shopper won’t buy a car—beating out a vehicle’s dependability rating … with rising consumer expectations and auto-maker competition, the once lowly seat is now getting some much needed attention … Some seats offer “lane-departure warning systems that shake a corner of the seat, heating and cooling options, and, in some cases, a massage feature.”

“Cars 20 years ago were all about horsepower, tire width or how fast you could go from zero to 60,” says Ray Scott, of Lear Corp., a seat designer. “Now it’s all about the driving experience, and seats are where the person is spending most of the time.”

“Lear has developed technology that turns the seat into a biometrics scanner with the ability to monitor the occupant’s heart rate and display it on the center entertainment screen.” Tesla “is offering vegan-style seating in its Model X and the new Model 3 SUV due out next year. The option involves seats covered with synthetic leather.”

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Small Bore: Is Apple Thinking ‘Different’ Enough?

“Apple’s view increasingly feels like an outdated way of thinking about tech. Many of its competitors have been moving beyond devices toward experiences that transcend them,” writes Farhad Manjoo in The New York Times. These new technologies exist not on distinct pieces of hardware, but above and within them … it’s hard to tell if Apple is thinking big enough.”

“Apple still seems to view online services as add-ons to its devices — not as products or platforms that rise above them.” For example: “Siri, as Apple is positioning it, is becoming a better app launcher for your phone … But it’s not clear that it’s becoming a truly intelligent assistant.”

“One problem is that the new Siri will not integrate with all kinds of apps … It’s hard to shake the suspicion that Apple is using Siri to give its own apps a leg up … Another problem is that Siri is still hopelessly tied to each Apple device … If Siri is an intelligent assistant, why … can’t she call Uber from the cloud, regardless of which device you happen to be using?”

“Google, Amazon and several start-ups seem to be rushing headlong to build such a system. But … I’m not sure Apple is,” Manjoo writes. “It’s taking a more moderate app-based, device-centric path. Many of its voice features will be fine — useful, even. But it sure isn’t pushing for a revolution.”

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De-Branding: A Shift From Products to Places

Fast Company: “It’s misleading to use a totally different set of qualities—good stories—to sell a product that has intrinsically nothing to do with these qualities. Hiring a top filmmaker won’t improve the quality of your energy drink … You could even say that the better the stories, the more dishonest the companies are being.”

“Here’s where debranding comes into play … the focus will shift … from branded products to branded places: stores and their owners who select and sell the products they like … Back to the traditional shopkeeper responsible for measuring bulk food and acting as an advocate for his products. Back to the real Dr. Browns, Uncle Bens, and Aunt Jemimas. Instead of brands, real people and real tones of voice will become the interface between consumers and products again.”

“And it is totally in line with today’s networked society … increasingly in the Internet age, consumers are comfortable with the idea that everything is interconnected. So what distinguishes brands is less important than what brings things and people together—whether your iPhone can talk to your Prius, for instance, or whether you can read articles from disparate sources in one place, like on Facebook. The brand that screams the loudest no longer commands the most attention; the one that offers something genuinely useful does.”

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The Art of Hospitality Goes Local

The New York Times: “Seeking to appeal to guests’ desire for new experiences and stand out in a competitive market, hotel brand managers are mining their local art communities for everything from inspiration to installations … The evolution in how managers view hotel artwork is similar to the shift toward showcasing more local ingredients in hotel restaurants.”

“Experts say the roots of the trend — a preference for experiences over objects, a penchant for tagging and bragging on social media — started with millennials. But travelers of all generations are taking note and boasting online to their friends.”

“While many prominent examples of hotels’ investing in local art are at the high end of the spectrum, lower-priced chains are not ignoring the trend. Graduate Hotels, a six-hotel chain that started in 2014 whose target market is college towns, uses local art to help it stand out from comparably priced competitors like Best Western and Quality Inn.”

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‘Listening Guides’ Enhance Live Music

Creative Review: “The Toronto Symphony Orchestra’s ‘listening guides’ make use of symbols and morse code-like notation to aid the experience of a live performance … A deft mix of text and graphics, the guides can be read while listening to the performance, their layout visualising the thematic progression of the music, indicating the keys in use, what instruments feature and, using morse code-like notation, their duration.”

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“Guides of all types to aid listening and comprehension of symphonic music have existed since the mid-to-late 19th-century … the guides were created to help develop audience appreciation for the art form,” says Hannah Chan-Hartley, who created the guides.

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Walmart Moves Upscale To Set Itself Apart

USA Today: “Depending on which Walmart store you choose nowadays, you might do a double take. In a growing number of stores, there’s an entire wall dedicated to organic produce, fresh sushi and a selection of about 50 gourmet cheeses … Forget just having a cold case of packaged deli meats — now there’s a charcuterie section … Roma tomatoes tumble down angled displays that make it easier to see what’s available and honeycrisp apples beckon from farmers market-style crates.”

“These Walmarts are the leading edge of what could become a grocery revolution at the giant retailer … Walmart’s produce and bakery sections are being upgraded to make them more attractive and easy to navigate … Further into the store, the bakery department now has chalkboard-style signs, lower tables that better showcase cakes and cookies, and bread baskets that invoke the charm of a local market … Walmart put department managers back in grocery after having removed many of them to improve efficiency … At the same time, Walmart is ramping up its online grocery service with store pick-up … The service doesn’t require customers to leave their car — a store employee brings out pre-bagged orders”.

“Walmart spokesman John Forrest Ales says many pick-up customers then stay and shop some more … The higher-end feel of its food offering may also attract higher-earning customers who could help increase sales in other areas too … Walmart can no longer rely on its bread and butter — low prices — to set itself apart.”

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The 6-Day Workweek: A Productivity Builder?

The New York Times: “At Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska University Hospital … the orthopedics unit switched 89 nurses and doctors to a six-hour day. It hired 15 new staff members to make up for the lost time and extend operating room hours. At 1 million kroner (about $123,000) a month, the experiment was expensive … But since then, almost no one calls in sick, and nurses and doctors have been more efficient.”

“The unit is performing 20 percent more operations, generating additional business from treatments like hip replacements that would have gone to other hospitals. Surgery waiting times were cut to weeks from months, allowing patients to return to work faster and reducing sick leave elsewhere in the economy.”

Anders Hyltander, the hospital’s executive director, comments: “For years, we’ve been told that an eight-hour workday is optimal. But I think we should let ourselves challenge that view and say, ‘Yes that’s the way it is now, but if you want to increase productivity, be open to new ideas.’”

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FDA Re-Designs Nutritional Label

Gizmodo: “The FDA just released its first major change to its nutritional labels in over twenty years … The deadline for the change is July 26, 2018. But you should start seeing the new labels much earlier, as manufacturers start to make the switch.” The new label is on the right.

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