Tiffany’s & The ‘Tin Can’ Gambit

The New York Times: “Since joining Tiffany & Co. in January as chief artistic officer, Reed Krakoff has undertaken to freshen the image of the 180-year-old jewelry company. His first major footprint is on the fourth-floor home and accessories floor of Tiffany’s Fifth Avenue flagship, where the sacred and the profane are now commingling cheerfully … Which is how the world came to know the Tiffany Tin Can (actually sterling silver and vermeil, $1,000) … (‘When panhandling before the big riot, don’t be caught without this stunning $1,000 tin can from Tiffany’s.’)”

“Mr. Krakoff’s injection of levity is not an unwelcome twist on the usual gilded or silvered theme … Old luxury: Founder’s portrait. New luxury: Founder’s portrait in Sheetrock screws and plywood … Tiffany’s entry-level dog bowls read, merely, ‘dog.’ — bone china, $125 for a small version and $175 for a large — but on display is a sterling silver option that Joan Rivers had engraved for her dog, Spike, for those inspired to go bigger ($1,800 for a small version, $2,500 for a large) … Not recommended for cat play: Tiffany’s sterling silver ball of yarn, $9,000.”

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Ypperlig: IKEA’s ‘Excellent’ Adventure

Quartz: “IKEA’s new collaboration with Danish product designers HAY is intended to ‘challenge people’s perception of IKEA quality and design.’ Ypperlig (Swedish for ‘excellent’ ) debuts as IKEA’s newest and most collectible furniture line … The 15-year old furniture design brand is among the leading players in the modern Scandinavian design scene—their Copenhagen showroom is a regular stop in design tours of the city.”

“Design connoisseurs swooned over the handsome Ypperlig injection moulded chairs and coveted the stylish color update to IKEA’s iconic Frakta shopping bag.”

IKEA spokesperson Johanna Martin comments: “We believe in making products that our customers want to keep and live with for a long time, regardless if it’s a product made in collaboration with someone or part of our ordinary range. But there is also an emotional connection which is important when making things sustainable. If you like the product you will keep the product longer.”

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Nordstrom Local: Manicures, Not Merchandise

The Wall Street Journal: “Nordstrom Inc. is opening a new store next month that is a fraction of the size of its typical locations, where shoppers will be able to enjoy services such as manicures and on-site tailoring. Something it won’t carry: clothes … Nordstrom Local, scheduled to open Oct. 3 in West Hollywood, Calif., will span 3,000 square feet, far less than the 140,000 square feet of one of Nordstrom’s standard department stores.”

“It will contain eight dressing rooms, where shoppers can try on clothes and accessories, though the store won’t stock them. Instead, personal stylists will retrieve goods from nine Nordstrom locations in Los Angeles, or through its website. The stylists can also pull together looks for shoppers through a ‘style board’ app.”

“In addition to manicures, Nordstrom Local shoppers will be able to order wine, beer, coffee or juice from an in-store bar, and those who place orders on Nordstrom.com by 2 p.m. can pick them up there that day. They will also be able to return items at the store that they bought online or from other Nordstrom locations. Tailors will be available for alterations or to help members of Trunk Club, an online clothing service that Nordstrom acquired in 2014, select fabrics for custom garments.”

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Saks 5th Wellery: Luxury Prison-Style Workouts

Business Insider: “Saks Fifth Avenue’s flagship store in Manhattan has become, at least temporarily, a wellness paradise. The store has dedicated an entire floor to athleisure-focused shops and offerings like workout classes, salt rooms, and even vitamin guru services. This collection of shops make up The Wellery, which will be open at Saks through October. During your shopping experience, you can get your nails or eyebrows done, take an intense workout class, or find products that are tailored to a health-centric lifestyle.”

“One of the most intense activities at The Wellery is a prison-style boot camp run by the boutique fitness studio ConBody. The studio’s founder, Coss Marte, developed the classes during his time in prison. The $30 classes include resistance exercises using body weight and are taught by formerly incarcerated trainers … On a more relaxing note, the Breathe Salt Rooms provide a holistic treatment that claim to have a healing and detoxifying effect on respiratory conditions and the skin … You can also sit through a guided meditation while having your nails done at Sundays, a salon that uses nontoxic nail polishes.”

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Consumer Culture & The Ikea Catalog

Quartz: “Beginning July 31, IKEA’s highly-anticipated catalogue will appear in millions of mailboxes around the world … This year, it took the Swedish company 18 months and a hundreds-strong army of photographers, art directors, copywriters, proofreaders, prop masters, carpenters, photo retouchers, programmers and CGI specialists to produce the catalog’s 1,400 pieces of art and 24,000 texts. While the text remain basically the same worldwide, IKEA’s team does go the extra mile to swap out subtle, tell-tale details in 72 different region-specific editions.”

“Knowing that kitchens in China are much smaller than the US for example, catalogue designers crop into a photograph and reposition elements in post-production, to illustrate a cozier cooking space … Last February, members of Israel’s ultra-Orthodox Jewish community received a 67-page, all-male product catalogue with challah boards, Shabbat candlesticks, tables set for the Sabbath meal, and Billy bookcases propped with volumes of the Talmud and Bible, the Jerusalem Post reports.”

“The annual catalogue is also a way for IKEA to set prices for their different markets, factoring in the cost of goods, transport, and tariffs and the foreign exchange rate … IKEA works with five paper suppliers and 31 printers around the world to produce the catalogue each year. In choosing the paper … they even consider how different markets perceive quality vis-a-vis the paper’s brightness and sheen. An Ikea exec comments: “People have a ‘magazine moment’ with a cup of tea, at home, touching the paper.”

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Will Mom & Pops Rise Again?

New York Magazine: “What becomes of the ground-floor city when retail mutates into new forms? Some luxury brands might keep their boutiques as indulgences and loss leaders. But as national chains’ contracts give up on physical locations, commercial rents could fall, clearing the way for a resurgence of small stores: designer cookies and pet spas, but also used-book stores and shoe-repair shops. Or maybe only bars and restaurants will survive, and we will repurpose vacant storefronts into living spaces for a housing-strapped city.”

“Amid all these conflicting trends, the architecture of retail is feeling its way, with sometimes-happy results. The new Nike palace by BKSK, on Broadway at Spring Street, is a paradox, a small structure that contains an immense store and looks at first glance like it was always there. The façade, which fades from masonry to glass as it approaches Broadway, turns it into one of the finest commercial buildings in recent years. Inside is a jangling theme park of high-tech comfort and moisture-wicking synthetics. But the sepia exterior looks as though it has just leapt from an old photograph.”

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How TJ Maxx Defies Digital Gravity

The Wall Street Journal: “Traditional retailers are in crisis, damaged by rapidly shifting consumer tastes, technological change and cut-throat price competition. And then there’s TJX Co., which is defying gravity with the simple idea that under the right circumstances people still like to shop in stores … Central to TJX’s success are its merchants. The company employs more than 1,000 buyers who buy apparel and other goods from more than 18,000 suppliers around the world. Each buyer controls millions of dollars and has authority to cut deals on the spot, unlike most department stores, which can take weeks to review and approve orders.”

“Stores typically get deliveries several times a week. The schedule ensures a continuous stream of products to lure shoppers. And because TJX doesn’t purchase the full range of colors and styles, stores have one or two items in a particular color or size, giving customers an urgency to buy … Its stores have no walls between departments, so it can quickly reconfigure floor plans. Similar clothes from different labels can be found on the same rack.”

“One area where TJX trails other retailers is on the Internet … Some brands won’t let TJX sell their products online because they don’t want the items to be easily searchable at lower prices. For certain brands that allow online sales, shoppers have to click on items before they can see brand names. The restraints are similar to those in the physical world, where some companies do not allow TJX to advertise their brands. Advertising individual labels is not part of TJX’s marketing strategy.”

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Neiman Markups: Out of Fashion

The Wall Street Journal: “Once upon a time, all Neiman needed to do to lift profits was raise prices. That model has since fallen out of fashion … competition from startups like Farfetch.com and Matchesfashion.com are forcing more discounts. Over a recent 24 hours, Farfetch’s prices averaged 2% lower and Matchesfashion’s 15% lower than Neimanmarcus.com’s prices on 32 identical items, according to price-tracking firm Market Track LLC.”

“While brands still exert control, particularly over the newest and most popular items, it is harder for them to police prices that change rapidly across websites and fluctuate with shifting exchange rates, industry executives said … The explosion of discount chains, led by T.J. Maxx , that sell designer brands at cut-rate prices also made consumers rethink the need to pay full price. To compete, high-end department stores rushed in with their own off-price chains—Neiman’s Last Call, Saks Off 5th and Nordstrom Rack.”

“Neiman’s Chief Executive Karen Katz … championed a line of specialty stores called Cusp, which Neiman opened a decade ago, that feature lower-priced clothing and accessories. Neiman stores also have added relatively less expensive goods, such as $700 Prada handbags … Ms. Katz reduced snob appeal by allowing Neiman shoppers to use Visa and Mastercard … Neiman has invested heavily in e-commerce … Not all the moves have worked. After building six Cusp stores, Neiman closed two and stopped development of the chain in 2012.”

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Footwear: How Saks Attracts Men

The New York Times: “Next week, Saks will open its first free-standing store specially for men, in Brookfield Place, the retail, office and dining complex in Lower Manhattan … The 16,000-square-foot Saks Fifth Avenue Men’s Store will include leather and shoe repair services, made-to-measure suits and a tech bar selling the latest gadgets … In the spring, an in-house Sharps barbershop and Fika coffee shop will be added. And a monthly rotating pop-up shop will feature, in the opening weeks, 200 styles of sneakers, 40 of which are Saks exclusives.”

Saks President Marc Metrick explains: “Footwear is a gateway drug.”

“Saks is luring the stylish new man with a palette of whites, taupes and silvers and chevron-patterned porcelain flooring. Gone is the brown-wood, Morton’s steakhouse look of the uptown men’s department. The vibe is not unlike the Saks women’s store at the opposite end of the complex.”

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