Instagram Oreos: The New Flavorites

The New York Times: “Oreo makes a lot of cookies — 40 billion of them in 18 countries each year — enough to make it the world’s best-selling cookie. Most of them are the familiar sandwich that’s over 100 years old: white cream nestled between two chocolate wafers. But the company has increasingly been experimenting with limited-edition flavors that seemed designed as much for an Instagram feed as they are to be eaten.”

“This year, the company released limited-edition flavors like Jelly Donut, Mississippi Mud Pie and Firework. They joined a packed shelf that has recently included flavors like Cookie Dough, Birthday Cake, Mint, S’Mores and Red Velvet, which proved so popular as a limited edition that the company upgraded it to everyday flavor status.”

“The company is using the hashtag #MyOreoCreation to collect suggested flavors. The top flavors, as determined by Oreo, will be produced and available nationwide next year for the public to vote on. And here’s where things get, comparatively, weird. Some contenders so far have included English Breakfast Tea (it tastes like tea), Peach Melba (has the flavor of a gummi peach), Mermaid (a sort of lime cream), and at least three doughnut-adjacent flavors to complement the Jelly Donut already in mass production … (The winning flavor may return for a limited-edition run or even as a permanent flavor, but that will be up to Oreo to decide.)”

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‘Experiences’ May Not Buy ‘Happiness’

Slate: “There’s a whole slew of social science research that suggests that to maximize happiness, it’s best to spend your money on activities, not material goods … But new research from the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, or HAS, adds a wrinkle to the discussion—its new paper suggests that perhaps in embracing this idea, we have been slightly unfair to our stuff.”

“The research, published by Tamás Hajdu of the Institute of Economics at HAS and Gabor Hajdu of the Institute of Sociology at HAS … found that the difference in satisfaction conferred between the different purchase types was both incredibly small and not statistically significant.” They report: “Although both experiential and material expenditures were positively associated with life satisfaction, we found no significant evidence supporting the greater return from experiential purchases.”

“Most research still suggests that money makes people happier when it’s spent on activities. In fact, even this research found that to maximize happiness, you should spend a little more on experiences—it just also found that this “gain” in happiness was incredibly, perhaps unnoticeably, small.”

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Patel Brothers & The Soul of a Supermarket

Quartz: “Patel Brothers is a store that exists at the juncture of pragmatism and fantasy; the store has realized a possibility for pluralist cultural exchange without sacrificing its Indian DNA. Patel Brothers has spawned a subgenre of Indian grocery stores … yet it towers over this ecosystem like a citadel of the Indian-American grocery chain … A visit to Patel Brothers can feel like emerging from a plane: Your sense of the world becomes radically slower, the activity of grocery shopping gaining a more leisurely glean than the frantic stress that can ordinarily accompany a trip to the supermarket.”

“We go to the supermarket to get what we need. But our needs are determined by who we are and how we feed our obsessions. At the grocery store, everything we’d ever want is presented to us matter-of-factly, and we are forced to confront the extent of our desires. Our needs are not simply material. These are selfish, soulful wants, and they come from pits deeper than our stomachs.”

“It’s terrifying to imagine a world where this store does not exist. Here is a business venture born out of one man’s hankering for home and his family’s willingness to ease it. How comforting that they were brave enough to wield these desires openly, so that the rest of us could satisfy the hungers we don’t always realize we have.”

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Distal or Proximal? How Senses Affect Purchases

Fast Company: A Brigham Young University study “found that ads highlighting more distal sensory experiences like sight and sound lead people to delay purchasing, while those that emphasize more proximal sensory experiences like touch or taste lead to earlier purchases.”

“In one experiment, study subjects read ad copy for a summer festival taking place either this weekend or next year. One version of the ad copy emphasized taste (‘You will taste the amazing flavors . . .’), and another focused on sound (‘You will listen to the amazing sounds . . .’). Those who read the ad copy about taste had a higher interest in attending a festival this weekend, while those who read ads emphasizing sounds were more likely to have interest in attending the festival next year.”

Ryan Elder, lead author of the study, comments: “Vision and sound, which are more distal sensory experiences, will help sell products and experiences far from where the consumer currently is, or purchases made in the future. They also help in advertising products consumers may buy for a more distant other, like a colleague. In contrast, taste and touch, which are more proximal (closer) sensory experiences, will help sell products or experiences physically close to the consumer, or for purchases made right now. In addition, when advertising products consumers may buy for a close friend, touch and taste will help sell the product better.”

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French Twist: How Yoplait Manufactures Authenticity

The New York Times: “Thick, sour Greek yogurts with names like Chobani, Fage and Oikos were surging in popularity. Sales of runny, sugary Yoplait were oozing off a cliff. So Yoplait executives ran to their test kitchens and developed a Greek yogurt of their own … They called it Yoplait Greek. It tanked almost immediately. And so has almost every other Greek yogurt product that Yoplait has put on shelves.”

“So now, Yoplait is opening a new front in the cultured-milk battles … They’re calling it Oui by Yoplait, in homage to the company’s French roots … if, as you are shopping, you happen to pick up a small glass pot of Oui and are momentarily transported to the French countryside, you’ll know that the company has finally figured out how to look beyond the data and embrace the narrative. Yoplait may have figured out how to fake authenticity as craftily as everyone else.”

“Yoplait began scouring its own history and ultimately found a tale that seemed to resonate: For centuries (or so the story goes), French farmers have made yogurt by putting milk, fruit and cultures into glass jars and then setting them aside. So Yoplait tweaked its recipe and began buying glass jars … It has a creamy texture and sweet flavor. And if this product is a success — if years from now someone tells the heartwarming story of how the Greek hordes were defeated by simple French pots — then we’ll know that Yoplait’s number crunchers finally figured out the formula for authenticity, and have reclaimed their crown.”

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How TJ Maxx Defies Digital Gravity

The Wall Street Journal: “Traditional retailers are in crisis, damaged by rapidly shifting consumer tastes, technological change and cut-throat price competition. And then there’s TJX Co., which is defying gravity with the simple idea that under the right circumstances people still like to shop in stores … Central to TJX’s success are its merchants. The company employs more than 1,000 buyers who buy apparel and other goods from more than 18,000 suppliers around the world. Each buyer controls millions of dollars and has authority to cut deals on the spot, unlike most department stores, which can take weeks to review and approve orders.”

“Stores typically get deliveries several times a week. The schedule ensures a continuous stream of products to lure shoppers. And because TJX doesn’t purchase the full range of colors and styles, stores have one or two items in a particular color or size, giving customers an urgency to buy … Its stores have no walls between departments, so it can quickly reconfigure floor plans. Similar clothes from different labels can be found on the same rack.”

“One area where TJX trails other retailers is on the Internet … Some brands won’t let TJX sell their products online because they don’t want the items to be easily searchable at lower prices. For certain brands that allow online sales, shoppers have to click on items before they can see brand names. The restraints are similar to those in the physical world, where some companies do not allow TJX to advertise their brands. Advertising individual labels is not part of TJX’s marketing strategy.”

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New Realities of the Grocery Experience

The Wall Street Journal: “The challenges for grocers today include a new reality: The days of shoppers filling carts during a big weekly trip to their neighborhood supermarket appear over for now. Consumers are more targeted in their shopping habits. They are less loyal to retailers and more willing to buy groceries online. And they are buying more from stores at two poles: ones with cheap prices, and ones that offer high-quality fresh food, often at a premium.”

Natalie Kotlyar, a consultant, says shoppers expect “convenience, selection and the right price and they want it now. Everyone is trying to meld those concepts to create the perfect shopping experience.”

“Chains that don’t adapt quickly to the changes in consumer behavior and business dynamics won’t survive, say analysts, who, along with some supermarket executives, expect more consolidation in the coming years and predict more grocery stores will close. To compete with Amazon, Wal-Mart is offering curbside pickup and home delivery in test markets. Kroger is expanding its platform for customers to order groceries online and pick them up at the stores. It also said it has invested $3.8 billion in lowering its prices over the past decade.”

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Schrager’s Public: Affordable Hotel Luxury

Quartz: “Forty years after redefining nightlife with the legendary New York City nightclub Studio 54, the hotelier and real estate developer Ian Schrager’s newest vision is for a new kind of affordable luxury—a hotel and arts center in downtown Manhattan that offers a blueprint for disrupting the mid-market hotel sector.” Schrager says “people don’t care about the gold buttons or if coffee is served in bone china. We offer luxury without it being obsequious.”

“With rooms starting at $200 a night, PUBLIC New York is geared to the tech-savvy Airbnb set—who are taking a growing bite out of hotel bookings. At that price, the new brand is playing the same field as some of the highest valued hotel brands, and particularly their fewer-frills ‘select service’ hotels, which have thus far weathered the exodus to Airbnb relatively well.”

“At the heart of all of Schrager’s brand propositions—from Studio 54 to the PUBLIC—is community, a growing trend in hotel design. PUBLIC is designed for a generation of savvy entrepreneurs; the hotel blurs lines between social, professional and cultural spaces with serene, light-filled, public venues with amenities to support optimal productivity and social interaction … Fast wifi and sleek design may lack the debauchery of his Studio 54 heyday, but Schrager’s new model for hospitality seeks to still offer today’s guests the opportunity to be a part of a scene.”

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Jig-Sawge: Hacking Saws for Massage

The Wall Street Journal: “The popularity of massage is rising along with the price of electric gadgets for it. So some do-it-yourself-ers are raiding garages and Home Depot and turning power tools into turbocharged robo-masseurs. Bill De Longis, head strength coach at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., uses a jigsaw—with a lacrosse ball pierced and epoxied to its business end—for limbering the limbs of the school’s varsity athletes. He calls it his ‘jig-sawge.’ He opted to hack the $60 saw after seeing a similar massage tool priced at $600.”

“The coach also has appropriated an orbital sander (with sandpaper removed) and a battery-powered car buffer, which Trinity’s baseball pitchers and women’s lacrosse team use to warm up. Using power tools for massage seems to have originated among weightlifters and other serious athletes. The idea spread on social media, and now power tools can be found everywhere from chiropractors’ offices to tie-dyed campouts.”

“Nova Han, artistic director for the Electric Forest music festival in Rothbury, Mich., equipped a 1940s Quonset hut-style space on the event’s grounds with massage tables. Last summer, staff members dressed like Rosie the Riveter and worked rotating shifts for 12 hours a day, giving short car-buffer massages to concertgoers.” Tim Perra of Stanley Black & Decker comments: “We do not condone, approve or recommend that our tools be used for any application beyond those for which the tool was designed and intended.”

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Tote Bags Carry The Brand Message

The Wall Street Journal: “Sturdy, canvas, waterproof or made of recycled material, tote bags take up an expanding part of our lives (and car trunks) as cities, counties and states continue to impose fees or bans on plastic bags. Stores either give them away free with purchase or sell them for a couple bucks in the hopes that consumers will like them and carry them—and that others will notice.”

“When totes are durable and reusable they become longer-lived ad campaigns. Swimwear label 6 Shore Road’s founder, Pooja Kharbanda, says that she made 1,000 tote bags to distribute at pop-up stores in Montauk, N.Y., and Newport, R.I., this summer. She estimates the cost is 2.5 times what it would be if she had just chosen paper bags. But she hopes the bags will turn up on the beach, carrying flip flops and towels … Some retailers sell the bags to help cover the cost. H&M ’s tote bags cost $2 to $4 and help spread the word about its garment recycling program. Customers who trade in old clothing or textiles can get 15% off their purchase.”

Marybeth Schmitt of H&M North America comments: “We know that word-of-mouth is the strongest kind of advertising. And, this is like a form of word-of-mouth. They are recommending it by wearing it.”

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