Online Feels ‘Off’ to Most Shoppers

Supermarket News: “Going by the trends in retail grocery, online ordering of groceries and meal kits likely stand near the top. But by the numbers, the vast majority of Americans are doing neither, a new Gallup poll finds. Of 1,033 U.S. adults surveyed, 84% said they never order groceries online and 89% never order meal kits, according to Gallup, which released the study results this week.”

“The small percentage of consumers that do order groceries or meal kits online don’t do it very often. Just 11% reported they order groceries online for pickup or delivery twice a month or less, and 4% said they do so once a week or more. Meanwhile, 9% of respondents order meal kits for home delivery two times monthly or less, and only 1% do so once weekly or more.”

Lydia Saad of Gallup comments: “Services like PeaPod, Instacart, Shipt and Amazon Fresh that cut out the trip to the grocery store appeal mainly to those short on time: parents with children younger than age 18 and employed adults. Higher-income Americans are also bigger adopters of grocery delivery, either because higher income means they can afford more groceries or they have greater access to mobile technology like smartphones and tablets that make ordering online easier.”

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Craft Beer Lightens Up

The Wall Street Journal: “While mega breweries flaunt puny carb counts, microbrew fans tend to assume that ‘lite’ means flavorless. Lately, however, craft brewing has been quietly losing weight, squeezing into macro-brew territory with beers as low in alcohol and calories as mass-made lagers—only deceptively, defiantly flavorful. Small-scale breweries have, historically, produced big, bold brews … But a strange thing happened in 2007 when Dogfish Head Brewery released Festina Peche, a slightly sour, peach-infused wheat that barely tipped the scales at 4.5% ABV and 8 IBUs (International Bittering Units): It sold.”

“While Dogfish still sells truckloads of crushers such as 120 Minute IPA, the brewery’s SeaQuench Ale, a 4.9% gose released in 2016, has been the fastest-growing beer in the company’s history … Lagunitas and other breweries like them are retooling accordingly. Yes, Lagunitas, makers of boozy bruisers like aptly named Maximus (8.1% ABV) and Hop Stoopid (8% ABV) is releasing light beer … Tuning down their brews shifted Dogfish Head‘s source of inspiration, too, from American hop fields to the European grain belt.”

For “Dogfish Head’s latest light beer, Grisette About It! (3.5% ABV and under 100 calories) … the brewers chose grisette, an old-timey French wheat-beer style. To emphasize its grainy character without carb-loading, they used a low-sugar, 17th-century oat variety from Columbia, S.C., granary Anson Mills, along with malted wheat and a little honey.”

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The Price is Right — Or is It?

The Wall Street Journal: “A simple mathematical error leads shoppers to make mistakes when evaluating offers that promise to save them money. Sometimes they inadvertently pick the priciest option. Sometimes they overestimate the benefit of a bargain. And sometimes they don’t recognize that competing promotions offer identical savings. The problem involves percentages.”

“Instead of comparing unit prices, shoppers tend to judge offers based on the size of the benefit. Getting 50% more of a product must be better than knocking 33% off its cost, right? Wrong. The savings are identical, but on the fly, even savvy shoppers make mistakes … Consider a pound of coffee beans that normally costs $15. If a shopper receives 50% more free, the price is $5 for each half-pound. A discount of 33% reduces the original cost to $10, which is also $5 per half-pound.”

“One of the most common ploys used to sway consumers is the double discount. A 40% discount on a $1,000 suit drops the price to $600. Marking the suit down twice, first by 20% and then by an additional 25% decreases the cost to $800 before shrinking it to $600. The deals are identical, but the double discount feels more generous … To test responses to offers of discounts or bonuses along with shoppers’ ability (or willingness) to calculate percentage change, .. several experiments revealed that consumers generally favor product bonuses over price discounts, reduced quantities over increased prices and double discounts over single discounts.”

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Yes, The Cow Had a Name: Dinner

The Wall Street Journal: “The menu at chef José Andrés’s Bazaar Meat in Las Vegas notes that its Vaca Vieja steak is made from a “hand-selected working cow.” The beef comes from a meat company called Mindful Meats, where, on the cow’s ‘final day,’ employees ‘look each cow in the eye and say thank you as they load onto the trailer,’ its website explains. Welcome to the final frontier in the discussion about transparency in food: meat … The challenge for restaurants and food providers is to give information without turning stomachs.”

“It’s a fine line between transparency and oversharing. At Blackbelly Restaurant in Boulder, Colo., servers are coached to let customers take the lead in discussing the provenance of the meat, says chef and owner Hosea Rosenberg. On a typical evening, about one-third of customers will want to order without much discussion, says Mr. Rosenberg. Another third is interested in more specifics—like cuts of meat, or particular breeds of animals—before their eyes glaze over, he says. The last third is interested in even more details, such as types of grasses or grains the cow was fed, what it weighed, and what farm it was from. Sometimes they ask if it had a name. (‘We named it Dinner,’ he says).”

“Randy Golding, a retired chemical engineer in Cedar City, Utah, orders steaks, chicken and ground beef every three months from Firefly Farms in North Stonington, Conn. He says he has spoken directly with the farm manager, Dugan Tillman-Brown, for at least an hour, asking questions such as how the animals were treated (‘They have names. They have personalities,’ says Mr. Tillman-Brown) to how they are slaughtered (a quick shot to the head with a steel bolt) … Mr. Golding says those details help him and his wife, Lisa, feel better about eating meat knowing the animal wasn’t mistreated. “

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Bowl Food: Comfort in Troubled Times?

The Wall Street Journal: “A good rule for modern eating seems to be: When in doubt, put it in a bowl. Gone are the days when bowls were used only for soup or cereal. These days, we put all manner of things in bowls that once had no place there, from poached eggs to smoothies. Even Prince Harry and Megan Markle chose to offer breakfast food to guests at their wedding in bowls rather than on plates … Capacious bowls feel like the right container for the Asian-oriented dishes that many of us now prefer, not to mention pasta.”

“A ‘wellness bowl,’ also known as a Buddha bowl, reassures the eater that they have all their nutritional bases covered. The ingredients are all visible, one after another, like bullet points on a to-do list: tofu, green vegetables, quinoa, some kind of obscure seeds … Our abandonment of plates for bowls suggests that we are reverting to the simpler times of one-pot cookery, liberating ourselves once and for all from fork anxiety. Today, the thing that we are most short of in the kitchen is not necessarily money but time. Sales of bowls have climbed in tandem with the rise of the Instant Pot and the pressure cooker, time-saving gadgets that produce tasty dishes too sloppy for a plate.”

“Both bowls and spoons have always been associated with children; spoons are the most benign utensils, lacking the sharp edges of a knife or the spikes of a fork. It is from a bowl that most of us take our first gummy mouthfuls of solid food. The rise of the bowl in our lives suggests that many eaters are in a permanently fragile state, treating every meal as comfort food. In a world of alarming news, maybe we all need something to cradle.”

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Lucky’s: Like a Hardware Store for Groceries

The Wall Street Journal: “Lowes Foods, a chain in North and South Carolina, introduced gourmet sausage stations and “beer dens,” where customers can drink while they shop or get a half-gallon jug filled with a craft beer, in 14 locations four years ago. After they were launched, ‘there was an immediate, noticeable increase in the number of men shopping in our stores,’ says Heather George, senior vice president of brand strategy. The male-focused amenities are now featured in 61 stores.”

“Hy-Vee Inc., a Midwest chain of more than 240 supermarkets, revamped its store recipe magazines this year to include sports stars on covers and weightlifting spreads … Mega Meat sales, where customers earn gas discounts, are particularly popular, Hy-Vee says … At Alfalfa’s Market, a Boulder, Colo.-based grocery-store retailer, the percentage of men shopping has risen to 40% from 30% while the share of female customers has declined, says co-owner Tripp Wall. He is currently expanding the company to 10 stores from its current two, and working with architects to incorporate more of a male point of view into designs.”

“Based on his observations of customers, Mr. Wall says, men like when they can see the exit, even when they are deep in the middle of the store. … The meat department offers butchery classes. Stores have even had requests for more-masculine floral arrangements.” Jonathan Schoenberg, a 50-year-old dad who shops at Lucky’s in Boulder, Colorado, comments: “Most supermarkets are pastel colors and sell tons of flowers, and the language is merry-merry, happy-happy … Lucky’s feels like a hardware store with groceries.”

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Why America Screams for Ice Cream

Boston Globe: “From the tables of European royalty to a bag of 10 Hoodsies for $2.98 at Market Basket, the story of ice cream echoes that of the American experiment — democratization, fueled by technology, ingenuity, and mass marketing. In the three centuries since the first ice cream recipe was published in English, this frozen food has become an integral part of American identity. Ice cream forms the slushy bedrock of our childhood nostalgia; it’s what people are supposed to eat after a break up because it makes you feel better; it’s the thing that Americans replaced drinking with during Prohibition. It looks great on social media (31 million #icecream photos on Instagram and counting), and, of course, it tastes really good.”

“Ice cream is now a nearly $60 billion a year global industry, expected to grow to nearly $75 billion by 2024. Americans are no longer the world’s top consumers of ice cream — that crown goes to China — nor do we consume the most per capita (that would be Norway, that dark horse). But although we are eating less of it than we did even five years ago, Americans still love ice cream, consuming 13 pounds of the stuff per capita in 2016 and spending $6.6 billion on it in 2017. The ice cream industry in the United States has remained stable in large part because we’re willing to pay more for it when we perceive it as ‘premium’.”

Margaret Visser “writing in ‘Much Depends on Dinner,’ noted that ice cream has become ‘invested, in European and American cultures, with what amounts to mythic power.’ Though ice cream has become cheap, it has never been quite cheapened. It remains ‘a sound and tasteful alternative to the empty vulgarities of junk food,’ Visser wrote. It exerts a pleasant nostalgic pull, for that lost childhood, for an old-fashioned time past, for a golden era that doesn’t exist now and probably never really existed, for what Visser describes simply as ‘elsewhere,’ — the country, the holiday, the seaside. Or to put it another way, as Vora said, ‘Ice cream is just fun’.”

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Late & Great: Allen McKellar

The Wall Street Journal: “Allen McKellar, an African-American college senior in South Carolina, figured his chances were slight in 1940 when he entered in an essay-writing contest in a bid to win an internship at Pepsi-Cola Co … Pepsi chose him as one of 13 interns. After serving in the Army, he returned in 1947 to join a Pepsi marketing team focused on African-Americans at a time when few large companies hired blacks for white-collar jobs.”

“At Pepsi, Mr. McKellar and his colleagues persuaded Duke Ellington and other jazz stars to give shout-outs to the soft drink, according to ‘The Real Pepsi Challenge,’ a 2007 book by Stephanie Capparell, a Wall Street Journal editor. They were treated as celebrities in the black press as they crisscrossed the country to pitch Pepsi by giving interviews and visiting schools, church groups and mom-and-pop groceries.”

“Pepsi already had set itself apart by offering 12 ounces for a nickel, while most rivals sold 6-ounce bottles for the same price. Promising “twice as much,” Pepsi ads appealed to the less affluent. The soft-drink company hoped its willingness to hire African-Americans for prominent roles and to market directly to blacks would give it further advantages over Coca-Cola.” In a 2009 interview, Mr. McKellar commented: “Back in those days, there were one or two things a minority kid could expect to do: You could become a teacher or, if you had the financial resources, a doctor. I became the national sales representative for the black market in America. I have been told this was a precursor for blacks in the corporate world.”

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How Jewelry Rattles The Millennial Market

The Wall Street Journal: “Jewelers are following fashion’s playbook for romancing millennials who are left cold by traditional, museum-like high-end boutiques. Brands are pulling out all the stops, designing products that customers can personalize and flaunting their ethical sourcing and sustainability. They are making online and in-store shopping distinctive and are hosting pop-up shops with limited-edition items.”

“The challenge is twofold: designing pieces that appeal to young shoppers and then persuading them to buy jewelry for themselves any time—and not just as the occasional milestone gift. Many millennials reserve splurging for technology or vacations—not fancy jewelry … When millennials do buy jewelry, they often seek out eclectic pieces from Gucci and other trendy brands. They also favor artisanal jewelry from small or new brands.”

“Diamond giant De Beers added nightclub touches to its sleek new Libert’aime by Forevermark store in Shanghai. The shop, which opened last month, has a scented VIP lounge for big-ticket purchases and a “diamond bar” with jewelry meant to be worn every day. One wall features an enormous detail of a diamond, where browsers can take Instagram-friendly selfies surrounded by gleaming facets. The jewelry in the shop is ‘designed to appeal to the 420 million millennials in China,’ the company said.”

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Kanye Tests Bite-Sized Music

The Wall Street Journal: “Kanye West is betting that good things can come from small packages. The 41-year-old rapper has produced five albums, each with seven tracks, many under three minutes. Released on consecutive Fridays, mostly by his record label, G.O.O.D. Music, and its partner Def Jam Recordings, the minialbums are making waves in a music industry where bigger has increasingly been seen as better … G.O.O.D. Music’s experiment is the latest instance of labels and artists tinkering with release strategies in the streaming age. Streaming is now the most popular way Americans listen to music. As listening habits change, record executives and musicians are trying to figure out how to reach fans and distinguish their releases in an increasingly crowded market.”

“Similar to how Mr. West’s provocative tweets and interviews in recent months helped him break through the clutter of social media ahead of his new releases, his seven-track albums are generating buzz for G.O.O.D. Music, music-industry experts say … It’s too soon to tell if shorter albums will trump longer ones in the streaming world … Bite-sized LPs may go down smoother for music fans inundated each week not just with music, but movies, videogames and social-media.”

“Mr. West hasn’t detailed his strategy, but he hints at the idea of shorter tracks on 4th Dimension, a 2½-minute song on Kids See Ghosts. The track samples Someday, by gospel singer Shirley Ann Lee, which includes the lines ‘you only want 2½ minutes if you can get it…three minutes maximum’ and ‘when it get too many then they can’t remember it and then they lose interest’.”

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