Indigo: Bookselling as a Cultural Experience

The New York Times: “It may seem strange for a bookstore chain to be developing and selling artisanal soup bowls and organic cotton baby onesies. But … Indigo is experimenting with a new model, positioning itself as a ‘cultural department store’ where customers who wander in to browse through books often end up lingering as they impulsively shop for cashmere slippers and crystal facial rollers, or a knife set to go with a new Paleo cookbook.” Book-industry analyst Peter Hildick-Smith, comments: “Cross-merchandising is Retail 101, and it’s hard to do in a typical bookstore. Indigo found a way to create an extra aura around the book-buying experience, by creating a physical extension of what you’re reading about.”

“The atmosphere is unabashedly intimate, cozy and feminine — an aesthetic choice that also makes commercial sense, given that women account for some 60 percent of book buyers. A section called ‘The Joy of the Table’ stocks Indigo-brand ceramics, glassware and acacia wood serving platters with the cookbooks. The home décor section has pillows and throws, woven baskets, vases and scented candles. There’s a subsection called ‘In Her Words,’ which features idea-driven books and memoirs by women. An area labeled ‘A Room of Her Own’ looks like a lush dressing room, with vegan leather purses, soft gray shawls, a velvet chair, scarves and journals alongside art, design and fashion books.”

“The new approach has proved lucrative: In its 2017 fiscal year, the company’s revenue exceeded $1 billion Canadian for the first time. In its 2018 fiscal year, Indigo reported a revenue increase of nearly $60 million Canadian over the previous year, making it the most profitable year in the chain’s history.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Figaro: Everyone Knew Her As ‘Nancy’

The New York Times: “The tiny Nissan Figaro has an almost cartoonish design that is guaranteed to stand out. To an American living in Britain, who regularly spots pristine Figaros, it would appear to be a highly popular model that was made recently. Every part of that guess is wrong: The Figaro is rather old, built for the 1991 model year, and there never were large numbers anywhere. Nissan never even exported it from Japan.”

“Britain never had dominant carmakers like Ford, General Motors and Chrysler. Instead, for generations, it had a profusion of small-to-medium manufacturers. Those carmakers produced a much wider array of designs than their American counterparts, a good number of them quirky, small, underpowered, none too practical — and beloved by their many admirers … An increasingly competitive and global market had less room for eccentric cars, British or not, or for models that sell only a few thousand.”

“Owners join Figaro clubs and Facebook groups, give their cars names, often buy more than one per family, and sometimes pay over 10,000 pounds, or $12,500 — more than the car cost new … It has an unusual ‘fixed profile’ convertible roof — the middle folds down, but the sides stay put … Nissan built the Figaro in pale shades of aqua, green, gray and taupe … More than 3,000 of the cars are registered as being in active use in Britain, but numbers are no longer rising, and the pipeline has slowed to a trickle. ‘There’s only so many, and they’ve been around awhile,’ said Peter Pattemore, who drives a Figaro (named Jimmy), as does his wife, Sandra (hers is Sally). ‘But we’re going to keep them as long we can’.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Doughnut That Ate Dublin

The Washington Post: “It looked like closing time at the county fair or the week before Christmas at the mall: cars just sitting there, bumper to bumper, waiting their turn to inch along. Dozens of vehicles lined up and down the aisles of the parking lot, honking as if every single driver in front of them was staring at their cellphone while stopped at a green light. It sounded like the traffic jam of the century. But, in fact, it was the Krispy Kreme drive-through at 1:30 a.m. in Dublin — the first to open in the country.”

“Neighbors complained to local government and Krispy Kreme executives that the noise from the doughnut drive-through had kept them awake for days, they told the Irish Times.After just one week, Krispy Kreme had to shut down Dublin’s 24-hour drive-through … Krispy Kreme has been around in the United States since 1937 and has more than 300 locations nationwide. It’s been called a ‘cult’ favorite in the past, inspiring ‘pilgrims’ to ‘pile into the car and drive for hours just to have a couple of Hot Nows,’ as Pittsburgh Post-Gazette writer Marlene Parrish wrote in 2001.”

“But Ireland’s reception appeared to be in a league of its own … As of Friday morning, the Irish Times reported a wait time of 30 minutes for the doughnuts, with metal barriers set up to control the queue like those found at a theme park.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Seltzer Hackers Pop SodaStream’s Bubble

The Wall Street Journal: “SodaStream’s popular countertop machines helped lower the cost of sparkling water by allowing users to make their own. For a hard-core group of fizzy-water fans, it’s still not cheap enough … In an effort to save more on each pour, these customers are hacking into their SodaStream machines by attaching their own canisters of carbon dioxide, often purchased at welding-supply or paintball stores … These gambits allow the hackers to avoid the roughly $15 fee the company charges for refill gas canisters—which fit into the back of the machine and can carbonate 60 1-liter bottles of water.”

“The practice of SodaStream hacking has become so popular that a small cottage industry has sprung up to support it. Vendors sell special adapters to support unofficial carbon dioxide canisters on the SodaStream, while others offer to refill the SodaStream canisters in ads on Craigslist and Facebook … In one popular video, the poster points to a 5-pound aluminum carbon dioxide tank and says, ‘You can steal these from landfills pretty much anywhere’… Israel-based SodaStream International Ltd. discourages the hacking and said tampering with the gas canisters violates its terms of service. It added it isn’t responsible for any ‘bodily harm that could be caused by misuse’.”

“Deviant Ollam, 42, of Seattle, said he bought a special adapter that allows him to attach a 20-pound carbon dioxide tank directly to his SodaStream machine … He said he purchased ‘food grade’ carbon dioxide from his local gas-supply store, which some SodaStream customers consider to be safer than the grade of carbon dioxide welders use. For him, the appeal is less about saving a few cents than using his wits to get ahead. His family is drinking far more sparkling water than they did before, just because they can, he said. ‘Why drink regular water again when you can have the ‘I’m sticking it to the man’ feeling?’ Mr. Ollam said.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Consumers are ‘High’ on Seltzer

The Wall Street Journal: “Sparkling water sales are soaring in the U.S. as consumers … ditch soda for healthier, more natural beverages. And with that explosion has come a wave of variants: caffeinated and alcoholic versions, sparkling coconut water and coffee, even seltzer laced with cannabis. Americans will buy an estimated 821 million gallons of sparkling water this year … That is nearly three times as much as 2008.”

“Jess Faulstich, 36, of Los Angeles is so hooked on flavored sparkling water that she takes one to bed in case she’s thirsty during the night. She loves coffee but drinks caffeinated sparkling water to keep her teeth white. A technology trainer by day and a stand-up comedian by night, she gained several pounds in the past year from drinking alcohol at clubs. Now she drinks hard seltzer, when she can find it, because it’s light on alcohol and on calories. ‘I’m surprised my bloodstream is not carbonated,’ she said.”

“Heineken NV, for its part, has a different type of buzz on tap. The company’s Lagunitas brand in July launched an IPA-inspired sparkling water line infused with cannabinoids. Its name: Hi-Fi Hops.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The A5 Ozaki: Lunch as $180 Sandwich Caper

Jason Gay: A $180 steak sandwich is an indefensible purchase. It is a foodstuff strictly for vulgarians, a decadent symbol of 21st-century gluttony and the over-luxurification of everything. To buy it is to wallow in one’s privilege, one’s shameless indifference to the plight of humankind. Other than that, it’s pretty tasty … This $180 Katsu sandwich can be found in lower Manhattan, around the corner from Wall Street, at a hole-in-the-wall establishment called Don Wagyu. Don Wagyu is a spartan place with a small bar counter, a partly-open kitchen and a half-dozen stools. It is visible from the outside thanks to a red neon sign of a cow smoking a cigarette, a nod to the vaguely-illicit goings-on inside.”

“How could a sandwich cost as much as a plane ticket to Florida? This is, after all, the type of thing that makes the rest of the planet think New Yorkers are out of their minds. Was the $180 sandwich (aka the A5 Ozaki) a legitimate food experience or some kind of commentary on late-stage capitalism? … Ordering the A5 Ozaki is not a showy experience. The lights do not dim, the kitchen does not clap; it does not require much more of a wait than a turkey club at a diner. A slice of beef is encrusted with panko, fried, placed on toasted white bread and served quartered, like a preschooler’s PB&J. Nori-sprinkled french fries and a pickle spear are the only accompaniments.”

“But the A5 Ozaki was light and buttery to the point of being almost ethereal, as if the sandwich knew the pressure of delivering on its comical price. Which, of course, it does not. There is no sandwich that is possibly worth $180. But that’s the thrill (and the crime) of extravagance, is it not? Eating this thing felt right and completely wrong—more like a caper than a lunch.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Online Feels ‘Off’ to Most Shoppers

Supermarket News: “Going by the trends in retail grocery, online ordering of groceries and meal kits likely stand near the top. But by the numbers, the vast majority of Americans are doing neither, a new Gallup poll finds. Of 1,033 U.S. adults surveyed, 84% said they never order groceries online and 89% never order meal kits, according to Gallup, which released the study results this week.”

“The small percentage of consumers that do order groceries or meal kits online don’t do it very often. Just 11% reported they order groceries online for pickup or delivery twice a month or less, and 4% said they do so once a week or more. Meanwhile, 9% of respondents order meal kits for home delivery two times monthly or less, and only 1% do so once weekly or more.”

Lydia Saad of Gallup comments: “Services like PeaPod, Instacart, Shipt and Amazon Fresh that cut out the trip to the grocery store appeal mainly to those short on time: parents with children younger than age 18 and employed adults. Higher-income Americans are also bigger adopters of grocery delivery, either because higher income means they can afford more groceries or they have greater access to mobile technology like smartphones and tablets that make ordering online easier.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Craft Beer Lightens Up

The Wall Street Journal: “While mega breweries flaunt puny carb counts, microbrew fans tend to assume that ‘lite’ means flavorless. Lately, however, craft brewing has been quietly losing weight, squeezing into macro-brew territory with beers as low in alcohol and calories as mass-made lagers—only deceptively, defiantly flavorful. Small-scale breweries have, historically, produced big, bold brews … But a strange thing happened in 2007 when Dogfish Head Brewery released Festina Peche, a slightly sour, peach-infused wheat that barely tipped the scales at 4.5% ABV and 8 IBUs (International Bittering Units): It sold.”

“While Dogfish still sells truckloads of crushers such as 120 Minute IPA, the brewery’s SeaQuench Ale, a 4.9% gose released in 2016, has been the fastest-growing beer in the company’s history … Lagunitas and other breweries like them are retooling accordingly. Yes, Lagunitas, makers of boozy bruisers like aptly named Maximus (8.1% ABV) and Hop Stoopid (8% ABV) is releasing light beer … Tuning down their brews shifted Dogfish Head‘s source of inspiration, too, from American hop fields to the European grain belt.”

For “Dogfish Head’s latest light beer, Grisette About It! (3.5% ABV and under 100 calories) … the brewers chose grisette, an old-timey French wheat-beer style. To emphasize its grainy character without carb-loading, they used a low-sugar, 17th-century oat variety from Columbia, S.C., granary Anson Mills, along with malted wheat and a little honey.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

The Price is Right — Or is It?

The Wall Street Journal: “A simple mathematical error leads shoppers to make mistakes when evaluating offers that promise to save them money. Sometimes they inadvertently pick the priciest option. Sometimes they overestimate the benefit of a bargain. And sometimes they don’t recognize that competing promotions offer identical savings. The problem involves percentages.”

“Instead of comparing unit prices, shoppers tend to judge offers based on the size of the benefit. Getting 50% more of a product must be better than knocking 33% off its cost, right? Wrong. The savings are identical, but on the fly, even savvy shoppers make mistakes … Consider a pound of coffee beans that normally costs $15. If a shopper receives 50% more free, the price is $5 for each half-pound. A discount of 33% reduces the original cost to $10, which is also $5 per half-pound.”

“One of the most common ploys used to sway consumers is the double discount. A 40% discount on a $1,000 suit drops the price to $600. Marking the suit down twice, first by 20% and then by an additional 25% decreases the cost to $800 before shrinking it to $600. The deals are identical, but the double discount feels more generous … To test responses to offers of discounts or bonuses along with shoppers’ ability (or willingness) to calculate percentage change, .. several experiments revealed that consumers generally favor product bonuses over price discounts, reduced quantities over increased prices and double discounts over single discounts.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Yes, The Cow Had a Name: Dinner

The Wall Street Journal: “The menu at chef José Andrés’s Bazaar Meat in Las Vegas notes that its Vaca Vieja steak is made from a “hand-selected working cow.” The beef comes from a meat company called Mindful Meats, where, on the cow’s ‘final day,’ employees ‘look each cow in the eye and say thank you as they load onto the trailer,’ its website explains. Welcome to the final frontier in the discussion about transparency in food: meat … The challenge for restaurants and food providers is to give information without turning stomachs.”

“It’s a fine line between transparency and oversharing. At Blackbelly Restaurant in Boulder, Colo., servers are coached to let customers take the lead in discussing the provenance of the meat, says chef and owner Hosea Rosenberg. On a typical evening, about one-third of customers will want to order without much discussion, says Mr. Rosenberg. Another third is interested in more specifics—like cuts of meat, or particular breeds of animals—before their eyes glaze over, he says. The last third is interested in even more details, such as types of grasses or grains the cow was fed, what it weighed, and what farm it was from. Sometimes they ask if it had a name. (‘We named it Dinner,’ he says).”

“Randy Golding, a retired chemical engineer in Cedar City, Utah, orders steaks, chicken and ground beef every three months from Firefly Farms in North Stonington, Conn. He says he has spoken directly with the farm manager, Dugan Tillman-Brown, for at least an hour, asking questions such as how the animals were treated (‘They have names. They have personalities,’ says Mr. Tillman-Brown) to how they are slaughtered (a quick shot to the head with a steel bolt) … Mr. Golding says those details help him and his wife, Lisa, feel better about eating meat knowing the animal wasn’t mistreated. “

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail