Walmart Moves Upscale To Set Itself Apart

USA Today: “Depending on which Walmart store you choose nowadays, you might do a double take. In a growing number of stores, there’s an entire wall dedicated to organic produce, fresh sushi and a selection of about 50 gourmet cheeses … Forget just having a cold case of packaged deli meats — now there’s a charcuterie section … Roma tomatoes tumble down angled displays that make it easier to see what’s available and honeycrisp apples beckon from farmers market-style crates.”

“These Walmarts are the leading edge of what could become a grocery revolution at the giant retailer … Walmart’s produce and bakery sections are being upgraded to make them more attractive and easy to navigate … Further into the store, the bakery department now has chalkboard-style signs, lower tables that better showcase cakes and cookies, and bread baskets that invoke the charm of a local market … Walmart put department managers back in grocery after having removed many of them to improve efficiency … At the same time, Walmart is ramping up its online grocery service with store pick-up … The service doesn’t require customers to leave their car — a store employee brings out pre-bagged orders”.

“Walmart spokesman John Forrest Ales says many pick-up customers then stay and shop some more … The higher-end feel of its food offering may also attract higher-earning customers who could help increase sales in other areas too … Walmart can no longer rely on its bread and butter — low prices — to set itself apart.”

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Hostel Territory: High Style on the Cheap

Fast Company: “For the past few years hostels—once the domain of twenty-something backpackers looking for cheap accommodations, design damned—have undergone a makeover and are touting the same amenities and aesthetic considerations as fancy hotels. Gone are the days of lumpy beds and questionable cleanliness … The Backstay Hostel, in Belgium, boasts accommodations in a gorgeous Art Deco structure. Grupo Habita—a luxury hotel developer—opened Downtown Beds in Mexico City.”

“The Generator, in Amsterdam, is outfitted with furniture from the au courant British designer Tom Dixon and hometown star Marcel Wanders. Its walls are festooned with whimsical wallpaper from the design-art duo Studio Job. Curated antiques and artwork add a quirky element to the lobby and guest rooms. Sounds like a recipe for the newest spendy boutique hotel, but a bed at the hostel will only set you back $15.”

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Chick-fil-App: No More Waiting in Line

Business Insider: “Chick-fil-A is rolling out a new app that will let customers avoid waiting in line at the register. The app, called Chick-fil-A One, will allow customers to order and pay for their food in advance, then pick it up at a counter designated for online orders. The app will also allow users to customize and save their favorite orders. Michael Lage, a veteran of Facebook and Google who helped develop the app, says it will change how customers, particularly parents with young children, experience and interact with Chick-fil-A.”

“To celebrate the launch of the app, Chick-fil-A is giving away free chicken sandwiches to everyone who downloads it between June 1 and June 11 … The app will continue to give away free food beyond the launch through its built-in rewards program, which will randomly send customers free-food offers based on what they typically order.”

“When customers get free treats from Chick-fil-A, they will have the opportunity to rate them. Those ratings will be factored into the app’s future free-food offers. Customers will typically get a choice of several items for their free-food offers. For example, they will be allowed to choose among a free drink, dessert, or medium fry. ‘We want to make sure the experience is based on personalization and choice,’ Lage said.”

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The ‘Perfect’ Ingredient Tells A Story

The Washington Post: “Artisanal beauty products are often built around at least one obscure ingredient, the procurement of which (it’s implied) is really difficult. There’s no distance these brands won’t travel, whether for a body scrub with ‘white sand particles from the shores of Bora Bora,’ or a ‘gel treatment serum’ made from ‘the stem cells of Australian kakadu plums.’ They might need to go back in time to craft skin products made with ‘donkey milk . . . known as a beauty elixir since the ancient ages.’ There’s an emphasis on the rare find from nature, almost but not quite lost to mankind … the fruit from a tree previously known only to peoples of the Amazon.”

“That rare ingredient must be gathered with care, ideally by local villagers, processed in a lab under the most stringent standards, and then placed into a product whose label declares its transparency of its process, its freedom from potentially dangerous chemicals, its fair trade and cruelty-free status, its philanthropic efforts, and the all-around goodness of its intentions.”

“The perfect ingredient doesn’t just moisturize or smell good or look pretty on a label; the perfect ingredient tells a story we all want to hear.”

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Organic Coup: The Costco of Chicken Sandwiches

Business Insider: “The Organic Coup, which is the first USDA-certified organic fast-food chain in the US, just raised $7 million in an initial round of financing led by Costco founder and former CEO Jim Sinegal … The chain, which specializes in fried-chicken sandwiches and chocolate-drizzled caramel popcorn, has two restaurants — one in San Francisco and another in Pleasanton, California.”

One of the restaurant’s co-founders is Erica Welton, a “food buyer for Costco for 14 years before leaving to launch Organic Coup with Dennis Hoover, a 33-year Costco veteran … Welton and Hoover don’t have any prior restaurant experience” but “are modeling the new chain off of Costco in many ways.”

“Organic Coup is paying starting wages of $16 an hour in San Francisco and $14 an hour in Pleasanton. Fast-food workers in the US make $7.98 an hour on average, according to PayScale. The restaurant’s specialty is its spicy fried chicken made from organic, air-chilled chicken breasts fried in coconut oil … The menu is pretty simple. Customers can get the fried chicken with a range of sauces on a bun, in a multigrain wrap, or in a bowl with shredded vegetables … The chain will be adding tator tots to the menu as well.”

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Study: LEGO ‘Guns’ For Greater Violence

Quartz: “The number of toy weapons such as miniature guns, knives, and harpoons featured in sets of tiny plastic LEGO building blocks has increased by 30% from 1978 to 2014, according to a study published last week in PLOS ONE by researchers at New Zealand’s University of Canterbury. The increase was primarily driven by higher numbers of weapons offered in film-themed packs, most recently in 2012 with Lord of the Rings LEGO sets.”

“The authors say this reflects a growing trend among children’s toymakers, and hypothesize that toy manufacturers add more depictions of violence to their products in order to stay relevant alongside increasingly violent movies and video games.”

“In an unrelated blog post, LEGO has argued that “conflict play” allows kids to use toys to creatively act out variations of their own disagreements, in a way that helps develop their own conflict-resolution skills.”

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Are You Smart Enough for Warby Parker?

The New York Times: “As an aesthetic, antifashion as fashion is annoying and alienating, as many people who are over 40, not particularly slender or less prestigiously schooled can attest when visiting a Warby Parker outlet. There is democracy in a relatively low price, but a sense of exclusion is woven into the gestalt.”

“Are you really smart enough to be shopping at Warby Parker? Have you read even a fraction of the books displayed? It’s dispiriting in a way to see old-fashioned chain stores feel as if they must contort themselves to stay vital in what is becoming an ever more polarized retail culture. A store like Cohen’s never makes you feel like a loser. Maybe it should post that outside of every branch, and declare a social victory.”

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FDA Re-Designs Nutritional Label

Gizmodo: “The FDA just released its first major change to its nutritional labels in over twenty years … The deadline for the change is July 26, 2018. But you should start seeing the new labels much earlier, as manufacturers start to make the switch.” The new label is on the right.

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Polaroid Story: The Camera Does The Rest

The Wall Street Journal: As described in The Camera Does The Rest, by Peter Buse: “There aren’t many 3-year-olds who can take credit for inspiring a revolution in the way millions of people view the world … it was engineer Edwin Land’s daughter, Jennifer, who asked one evening in 1943 why it took so long to view the photographs that the family had shot while on vacation … Land set out on a walk to ponder that question and, so the story goes, returned six hours later with an answer that would transform the hidebound practice of photography: the instant snapshot.”

The first Polaroid camera was introduced in 1948: “People loved watching the image emerge on paper—even in bright sunlight. Users of the early cameras waved the picture in the air believing that it would develop faster (it didn’t). Taking a photograph was suddenly fun in itself. You could view the good times while the good times were still going on … ‘One minute’ pictures owed nothing to the past; they celebrated the present.”

“The party might have gone on forever had it not been for … the digital revolution … The corpse of Edwin Land’s company was not yet cold when a wave of nostalgia for the Polaroid look swept over the digital-photo community. Today there are several apps that will duplicate the 70-year-old Polaroid appearance—white borders and all—including one app called ShakeIt Photo. The shooter snaps a photo with a smartphone, then shakes the phone to hasten development of the ‘film.’ And in an instant, like magic, the picture appears.”

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