Brendan Proctor: More than a ‘Lidl’ Different

Retail Dive: “We offer the experience of grocery retooled, rethought and refreshed,” says Lidl U.S. CEO Brendan Proctor. Among the differences: “Packaged goods will be placed on shelves in their cartons, eliminating the work that would go into unpacking. Produce displays will not be precariously stacked, making all the fruits and vegetables equally accessible to shoppers. And shoppers will bring their own bags and bag their own groceries, eliminating the cost of paper or plastic bags as well as employees’ time and effort in bagging.”

“Aside from the food items, Lidl plans to differentiate itself through its specials on non-food items … These specials could be anything from yoga pants to lawnmowers to leather jackets.” Also: “The retailer plans to streamline the grocery shopping experience and pare down customer choices. Proctor said that the product selection will be curated so that shoppers will not be overwhelmed with too many choices for staples like ketchup. Instead of multiple varieties of the same product, shelf space will be devoted to different kinds of items.”

“Lidl’s strong global presence makes imports of premium Belgian chocolates and Italian cookies to the U.S. much easier and more affordable. Lidl’s Preferred Selection brand features the flag of the item’s country of origin on the label ,,, For the time being, Proctor said the supermarket chain will concentrate on locations on the East Coast … Lidl will also concentrate on brick-and-mortar stores for shopping. There are no plans to work on e-commerce models, at least for now. People still prefer going to the grocery store over ordering online, he said.”

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Of Puppuccinos & Peanut Butter Bacon Burgers

The Wall Street Journal: “For some restaurant customers, the hottest items to order aren’t on the menu. In recent years, so-called secret menus have cropped up on social media and attracted a cult following. Devotees proudly photograph their McDonald’s Chicken Cordon Bleu McMuffins, Chipotle Quesaritos (a quesadilla-wrapped burrito) and Shake Shack Peanut Butter Bacon Burgers. Fans debate recipes and discuss how to order tricky items without provoking the ire of harried restaurant staff.”

“Some restaurants, like McDonald’s, deny the existence of such menus, although others say their staff will customize orders. Some establishments actually embrace the concept. Many creations are suggested and named by consumers, who detail online what ingredients to request. Sometimes, people put them together on their own.”

“Occasionally, secret menus aren’t limited to restaurants’ human clientele. Last year, Ricky Wolfe and his then-girlfriend, with dog Wally in tow, drove through a Starbucks in College Park, Md. She ordered a coffee and a Puppuccino. The barista, no questions asked, handed over a tiny cup filled with whipped cream. Mr. Wolfe, 28, was incredulous. Wally, a shepherd-hound mix, was apprehensive until her tongue met the whipped cream.”

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Brand Sagamore: Baltimore Walks The Plank

The Wall Street Journal: “Rising high above the new Sagamore Spirit distillery in South Baltimore is a white water tower with three maroon diamonds on each side, a nod to the jockey silks of the thoroughbred farm that provides the spring water for the company’s rye whiskey. The distillery, which opened a few weeks ago, is the latest endeavor of the growing business empire of Kevin A. Plank, founder and chief executive of the sportswear company Under Armour. His new enterprises — collectively they are called Plank Industries but nearly all have Sagamore in their names — are reshaping Baltimore’s waterfront and restoring luster to Maryland traditions and landmarks.”

“In March, Mr. Plank’s Sagamore Pendry hotel opened not far away in the Recreation Pier building in the Fells Point neighborhood after a roughly $60 million renovation. Outside the hotel, a fleet of new water taxis owned by Mr. Plank and modeled after Chesapeake Bay deadrise boats will soon ferry riders to Port Covington, the industrial South Baltimore waterfront area that is undergoing a $5.5 billion overhaul led by his real estate firm, Sagamore Development.”

“Inside the production center of Sagamore Spirit’s three-building complex in Port Covington, another three-diamond-stamped beacon greets passers-by: a 40-foot copper column still with a mirror finish that is believed to be the first of its kind. Asked why the finish was essential, Brian Treacy, president of Sagamore Spirit, channeled Mr. Plank, a childhood friend. ‘Because it’s all about brand,’ he replied.”

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Keurig Designs Eco-Friendly K-Cup

The Washington Post: “Keurig Green Mountain said it plans by 2020 to change the plastic composition in the billions of K-cup single-serving coffee containers it sells annually, making them more lucrative to recyclers while removing one of the nagging complaints that mountains of the little pods are piling up in landfills … The recycling breakthrough comes as the Keurig’s single-serve coffee machines, which helped revolutionize coffee consumption, are becoming less of a habit after years of growth.”

“The recycling breakthrough comes as the Keurig’s single-serve coffee machines, which helped revolutionize coffee consumption, are becoming less of a habit after years of growth … The problem with K-cups has been twofold. First, they have been too small for the sorting machines to ‘see’ and move to the recycling line instead of the garbage heap. Second, the material composition of the K-cup plastic did not lend itself to being broken down and reused as another material.”

“Many of the 600 or so recycling plants across the United States and Canada have reinvested in technology that can spot the K-cup pods and divert them toward reuse.”
In addition: “Keurig is in the process of changing the makeup of its K-cups from polystyrene to polypropylene.”

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The Stitch Fix Secret: Make Shopping Easy

The New York Times: Stitch Fix is a mail-order clothing service that offers customers little choice in what garments they receive, and shies away from discounts for brand name dresses, pants and accessories. Despite a business model that seems to defy conventional wisdom, Stitch Fix continues to grow … To the company’s founder, Katrina Lake, success comes down to delivering what consumers want: making it easier to shop … In her view, what was important was helping customers find clothing they liked without taking lengthy shopping trips and returning dozens of items.”

“At the company’s warehouse, Eric Colson, formerly a top data scientist at Netflix, spoke to the role that data science — once the province of high-tech giants — plays in nearly every aspect of the Stitch Fix business. Mr. Colson excitedly illustrated on whiteboards how the company’s systems can narrow down a broad range of women’s pants to a relative few that each individual customer is statistically likely to keep … Algorithms have even cut the number of steps needed for workers to pick out clothes for individual clients.”

“Yet the question remains whether customers who are initially thrilled by receiving a customized box of clothing will remain customers for months or even years … Stitch Fix executives declined to share their retention statistics, but claim that they are above industry averages.”

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Jet.com Tells Fresh Story In Real Life

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Business Insider: “Jet.com — the online retailer that Walmart bought in 2016 for $3 billion — is now selling some of its products IRL. From May 10 to June 18, Jet will have a food-themed concept shop in Manhattan which showcases artisanal accessories, cookbooks, and kitchen appliances. Most of the items are pretty quirky, like face masks made from tomatoes, kale-flavored chocolate bars, socks with ice cream prints, and banana-shaped flasks.”

“The Jet experience comes to life at Story, a 5-year-old retail space that changes its products, decor, and events programming about every month based on its particular sponsor. For the next six weeks, the sponsor is Jet, where people can also find most of the store’s items. The larger goal of the temporary store is to raise awareness around Jet’s grocery delivery service.”

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Who’s Better Than Trader Joe’s?

Business Insider: “A regional chain that most Americans have never visited was just named the best overall grocery-store chain in the US. Wegmans was the US’s highest-rated grocery chain out of more than 20 that appeared in Market Force Information’s annual survey of the industry … This is the second year in a row in which Wegmans has earned the top spot — though this year, it was forced to share the crown with Publix … With a score of 77% satisfaction, Wegmans and Publix beat out Trader Joe’s, which had 76% satisfaction, and the Texas-based H-E-B, which rounded out the top four with 69% satisfaction.”

“Wegmans stores are larger than the average grocery store, emphasizing variety and fresh products … Many locations have cafés, pizzerias, sushi bars, and buffets, plus seating areas for 100 to 300 people where customers can eat their food … The chain is also known for its extensive beer section, with a large selection of craft brews. Some locations even have walk-in beer lockers. Many customers love Wegmans because of its customer service.”

“Wegmans serves as a superior employer in the grocery industry. The company offers healthcare coverage for workers as well as college scholarships, paying about $4.5 million in tuition assistance to employees each year. All of these factors combine to create an army of Wegmans fans, responsible for the grocery chain’s top ranking. In 2015, the company reported that 7,300 customers contacted Wegmans to report how much they enjoyed their shopping experience or the way employees treated them.”

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Algorithmic Retail: Beyond Dynamic Pricing

The Wall Street Journal: “Advances in A.I. are allowing retail and wholesale firms to move beyond ‘dynamic pricing’ software, which has for years helped set prices for fast-moving goods, like airline tickets or flat-screen televisions. Older pricing software often used simple rules, such as always keeping prices lower than a competitor.”

“These new systems crunch mountains of historical and real-time data to predict how customers and competitors will react to any price change under different scenarios, giving them an almost superhuman insight into market dynamics. Programmed to meet a certain goal—such as boosting sales—the algorithms constantly update tactics after learning from experience … The software learns when raising prices drives away customers and when it doesn’t, leading to lower prices at times when price-sensitive customers are likely.”

“Algorithms can also figure out what products are usually purchased together, allowing them to optimize the price of a whole shopping cart. If customers tend to be sensitive to milk prices, but less so to cereal prices, the software might beat a competitor’s price on milk, and make up margin on cereal.”

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Two Buck Chuck: What Makes it So Cheap?

Business Insider: “Trader Joe’s wine is remarkably cheap. A bottle of the grocery store’s most popular wine brand, Charles Shaw (aka Two Buck Chuck, made by Bronco Wine) sells for less than $3.” What makes it so inexpensive? #1: “Most of the company’s vineyards are located in California’s San Joaquin Valley, where the cost of land is much cheaper than the more prestigious Sonoma or Napa Valley … Higher average temperatures in San Joaquin Valley can over-ripen grapes, which is a main contributor to the price difference between the regions.”

#2: “The company ferments wine with oak chips, which are cheaper than barrels.” #3: “The company uses … a mold of cork pieces glued together with a ‘real cork veneer at the bottom’.” #4: “Making wine in huge quantities keeps production costs low … The company uses machines to harvest the grapes, which helps keep labor costs low, but also increases the chances that bad grapes end up in the wine … Critics argue that mass production is also how animal matter can end up in your wine glass. But to be fair, there’s a chance of that happening with most agricultural products.”

#5: “Bronco cuts shipping costs by using lightweight bottles and cheap cartons … The lighter glass reduces the weight of a case of wine by several pounds, meaning Bronco can ship more wine at a time. Bronco also lowered the cost of its shipping cartons by a few pennies by replacing the white paper it was using with a light brown paper.”

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