Wannamaker’s Temple: Retail as Religion

The Wall Street Journal: The John Wanamaker Department Store was one of America’s first great temples of consumption … In “Wanamaker’s Temple,” Nicole C. Kirk argues that Wanamaker’s was more than a successful business enterprise, it was also a successful ministry. She notes that John Wanamaker, a Presbyterian, was as committed to evangelism and the social gospel as he was to selling silks and satins. As she writes: “Wanamaker saw his retail empire not as separate from religion but as an instrument of it, as a means for achieving moral reform in business, in the city, and in individuals’ lives.”

“Born into a working-class South Philadelphia family in 1838, Wanamaker began his career as a clerk in a men’s clothing store owned by a friend of his grandfather’s. By accident, he walked into a prayer meeting and heard a hat maker explaining that religion was part of his trade. Wanamaker was soon swept up in the Businessmen’s Revival, a Protestant prayer movement.”

?The store was filled with innovations: electric arc lamps, elevators, pneumatic tubes to move money and receipts. And it was infused with Wanamaker’s religiosity. In full-age newspaper ads, six days a week, he assured potential customers of his high-quality merchandise, his honest treatment of customers and his fairness to employees. ‘It was more than image making, although it was that as well,’ Ms. Kirk writes. ‘Wanamaker saw it as a part of his business mission—to make business a Christian enterprise and profitable’.”

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Hospitals ‘Tiptoe’ into Grocery Business

The Wall Street Journal: “Invoking the mantra that food is medicine, hospitals across the country are taking measures to prevent and treat illness through diet. To nudge patients into eating well at home, they have opened food pantries that offer nutrition counseling and healthful fare. They are growing their own produce, adding farmers to the payroll and hosting greenmarkets. A few are even tiptoeing into the grocery business.”

“ProMedica, a not-for-profit health system headquartered in Toledo, Ohio … set up two food pantries, where patients can receive nutritional guidance and free groceries. ProMedica opened a grocery store a few miles from one hospital, in an area that had been bereft of healthful food. Called Market on the Green, the store is open to the public, not just ProMedica patients.”

“Most grocery-store checkout counters are a gauntlet of candy. At Market on the Green, cashiers are surrounded by produce, while candy bars are tucked down an aisle. Whole-grain cereal is shelved at eye level, sugar-laden cereal can be found on harder-to-reach shelves … The store is a nonprofit enterprise (and) tries to steer shoppers with prices, putting smaller markups on healthful fare. For instance … whole-grain chips cost less than regular ones. Chocolate milk is ‘priced high’ to encourage children to drink skim milk.”

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The Doughnut That Ate Dublin

The Washington Post: “It looked like closing time at the county fair or the week before Christmas at the mall: cars just sitting there, bumper to bumper, waiting their turn to inch along. Dozens of vehicles lined up and down the aisles of the parking lot, honking as if every single driver in front of them was staring at their cellphone while stopped at a green light. It sounded like the traffic jam of the century. But, in fact, it was the Krispy Kreme drive-through at 1:30 a.m. in Dublin — the first to open in the country.”

“Neighbors complained to local government and Krispy Kreme executives that the noise from the doughnut drive-through had kept them awake for days, they told the Irish Times.After just one week, Krispy Kreme had to shut down Dublin’s 24-hour drive-through … Krispy Kreme has been around in the United States since 1937 and has more than 300 locations nationwide. It’s been called a ‘cult’ favorite in the past, inspiring ‘pilgrims’ to ‘pile into the car and drive for hours just to have a couple of Hot Nows,’ as Pittsburgh Post-Gazette writer Marlene Parrish wrote in 2001.”

“But Ireland’s reception appeared to be in a league of its own … As of Friday morning, the Irish Times reported a wait time of 30 minutes for the doughnuts, with metal barriers set up to control the queue like those found at a theme park.”

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Motorcycles Try ‘Post-Heritage’ Designs


The New York Times: A surfer-meets-biker festival in Biarritz, France, was an unlikely backdrop for America’s oldest motorcycle maker to showcase its latest handiwork. But that is where, in June, Indian Motorcycle made the announcement that a one-off design concept, inspired by county-fairgrounds racing machines, would become a production model.”

“Indian, based in Minnesota, is not alone among motorcycle makers in taking a daring, and perhaps unexpected, leap with its designs. Ducati, based in Italy, has hit pay dirt with its out-of-character Scrambler, introduced in 2015 … which expanded the company’s portfolio beyond muscular sport machines … Likewise, Husqvarna Motorcycles, a Swedish motocross legend now resettled in Austria, has branched out with a range of lithe, futuristically styled bikes. Even Royal Enfield, a British expat built in India, is moving beyond its frozen-in-time single-cylinder models.”

“Breakthrough models like the Scrambler are not necessarily the result of market research, Ducati’s chief executive, Claudio Domenicali, said, emphasizing that the Scrambler is a ‘post-heritage’ statement rather than retro.” He comments: “When we try to follow the competition, we’re not successful, so we look at what’s available and we invent products.”

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