Late & Great: Charles Hooley

The Wall Street Journal: “Bargain shoppers can thank Charles Hooley for the no-frills feel of more and more U.S. grocery stores … Groceries at his stores were unloaded from trucks as close as possible to the wooden shelves where they would be sold, and displayed in their shipping cases. At Cub Foods, which he and three partners founded in Minnesota in 1968, Mr. Hooley and his family dispensed with price tags on each item. (This was before bar codes.)”

“Instead, Cub gave shoppers black grease pencils to carry with them through the store. They read the price for a can of soup or box of cereal off its shipping case, then scrawled it on the item themselves. Checkout clerks tallied up a total from the prices a shoppers had written on their groceries. Fewer workers to individually price and stock Cub’s shelves meant lower prices overall.”

“In 1980, Mr. Hooley and his partners sold Cub Foods—an acronym for Consumers United for Buying—to Supervalu, which expanded Cub to more than 100 stores in 13 states. Mr. Hooley remained at Supervalu as Cub’s president until 1981.”

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