H&M Stores Buy Into Big Data

The Wall Street Journal: “H&M, like most retailers, relies on a team of designers to figure out what shoppers want to buy. Now, it’s using algorithms to analyze store receipts, returns and loyalty-card data to better align supply and demand, with the goal of reducing markdowns. As a result, some stores have started carrying more fashion and fewer basics such as T-shirts and leggings … H&M’s strategy of using granular data to tailor merchandise in each store to local tastes, rather than take a cookie-cutter approach that groups stores by location or size, is largely untested in the retail industry, consultants say.”

“The H&M store in Stockholm’s swanky residential Östermalm neighborhood hints at how data can help. The store used to focus on basics for men, women and children, with managers assuming that was what local customers wanted. But by analyzing purchases and returns in a more granular way, H&M found most of the store’s customers were women, and fashion-focused items like floral skirts in pastel colors for spring, along with higher-priced items, sold unexpectedly well.”

“With the help of about 200 data scientists, analysts and engineers—internal staff and external contractors—H&M also is using analytics to look back on purchasing patterns for every item in each of its stores. The data pool includes information collected from five billion visits last year to its stores and websites, along with what it buys or scrapes from external sources … The chain uses algorithms to take into account factors such as currency fluctuations and the cost of raw materials, to ensure goods are priced right when they arrive in stores.” Nils Vinge of H&M comments: “The algorithms work around the clock and adjust continuously to the customers’ ever-changing behavior and expectations.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

One thought on “H&M Stores Buy Into Big Data”

  1. Yeah, yeah. This kind of data mining/predictive analytics is just catching up with the 20th Century. It was available in 1997, but no one was paying attention.

Your Thoughts?

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.