Greek Tragedy: The ‘F’ Word is Feta Cheese

The Wall Street Journal: “U.S. cheese makers are in a sticky situation. They can’t call many of their popular cheeses by their common names anymore when selling them in many markets outside the U.S. The Sartori Co. cheese factory in Plymouth, Wis., has been making Asiago, Parmesan and other popular cheeses according to European recipes for decades and recently began exporting them. Last year, for export versions of those two cheeses, Sartori had to trademark new names, leading to the birth of Sartiago and Sarmesan.”

“The rules are a problem not just for producers trading with Europe, but also for those within the EU. With use of the term feta now restricted to the cheese from Greece, producers in other countries who have been making a similar cheese for decades have had to think up new names. ‘It’s the F-word we can’t say,’ said Theis Brøgger, a representative of Danish co-operative Arla Foods, one of the world’s largest dairy processors. Arla has adopted the name ‘white cheese’ or ‘salad cheese’ in Europe and other places where the rules apply. For consumers who still don’t understand, ‘we make sure that there is a large photo of the cheese on the outside,’ Mr. Brøgger said, adding that sales are growing.”

“Some cheese executives think a better way to get around the EU restrictions is to develop more original U.S. cheese recipes. Developing new local products, cheese makers ‘can pay tribute to the region where the cheese is being made or the town or the soil,’ said Heather Engwall, director of marketing at Emmi Roth” which “makes a bright-orange cheese called Prairie Sunset … Still, it is hard to create new names that relay a cheese’s qualities as efficiently as the established European name. Ms. Engwall said customers often ask, ‘What sort of cheese is it?'”

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