7-Eleven: When Convenience Is Not Enough

The Wall Street Journal: “For 7-Eleven, Big Gulps and Slurpees are no longer enough. The convenience-store pioneer is falling behind rivals that are gleaning more sales from healthier snacks and freshly cooked meals … The company’s executives said they are working to come up with better foods to sell in their 9,700 North American stores. ‘Simply being open longer than the competitor … is not enough,’ said Raj Kapoor, referring to the stores’ extended hours. Mr. Kapoor, a 23-year veteran of 7-Eleven, is head of fresh food and proprietary beverages.”

“The effort to freshen up 7-Eleven’s business has run into resistance from the chain’s franchisees. Eight out of 10 7-Eleven stores are owned by franchisees, most of whom own fewer than five stores. Many say it is too expensive to maintain new equipment like ovens, and that 7-Eleven needs to pay to remodel their stores if they want them to sell more fresh and hot food. ‘Our stores don’t look like we are in the food business,’ said Hashim Sayed, who sold his store in Chicago back to 7-Eleven this week after 25 years as a franchisee.”

“7-Eleven says it has been addressing the shift in tastes for several years. But competitors have done more to sell fresh—and more profitable—foods, analysts said. Regional convenience chains Wawa Inc. and Sheetz Inc. make custom salads and hot meals at on-site kitchens. Iowa-based Casey’s General Stores Inc. is now one of the largest sellers of pizza in the U.S. CVS Health Corp. has reorganized its drugstores to display healthy food more prominently.”

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