Alexa Challenges Brand Loyalty

The Wall Street Journal: “For decades, the makers of packaged-food, personal and home-care brands have bought shelf space at retailers like Walmart Inc. and Costco Wholesale Corp. that guarantee them nationwide exposure. They have poured billions into branding to make their products instantly recognizable. Selling on websites offers some of those same advantages: Brands can pay for placement on a webpage and display their packaging and logos. Voice shopping, which currently offers customers just one or two product options, could chip away at that tried-and-tested model.”

“In a test conducted in October, Bain & Co. found that for customers making a first-time purchase without specifying a brand, over half of the time Alexa’s first recommendation was a product from the ‘Amazon’s Choice’ algorithm, which implies a well-rated, well-priced item that ships with Prime. Bain also found that in categories in which Amazon has a private brand, 17% of the time Alexa recommends the private-label product first even though such products make up just 2% of volume sold.”

“For now, brands can’t pay Amazon to offer their products to customers in response to a generic request for a product, like detergent or paper towels …Without that paid-search option, P&G has been tinkering with ways to get noticed by shoppers using voice assistants, such as a Tide-branded Alexa app that doles out advice on how to clean over 200 stains but doesn’t suggest Tide products … Unilever, owner of Hellmann’s mayonnaise and Domestos toilet cleaner, has developed Alexa apps that give free recipes and cleaning tips that may or may not incorporate Unilever brands. Unilever sees the apps as a way to market its products by offering customers useful information when they need it most.”


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