Craeft & The Wisdom of Daily Life

The Atlantic: “In his new book Craeft, the archaeologist and BBC presenter Alexander Langlands offers a fascinating and surprisingly relevant dive into a subject that might seem niche to many—the origins of traditional crafts in medieval Europe … For Langlands, the Anglo-Saxon word ‘craeft’ is distinct from our modern word “craft” in spirit and in practice. ‘Craeft’ means having the wisdom of one’s surroundings, understanding nature and the seasons, and knowing one’s materials, as well as how objects and systems fall apart.”

“Apart from its use as a marketing term for, say, microbrews, the word today doesn’t usually connote a skilled trade. Unlike ‘working,’ ‘crafting’ is commonly understood as fun: It can be self-consciously silly, feathered, decoupaged, and brightly colored. It’s fun for kids and meditative for grownups. In most cases, the product of a crafting session is less important than the relaxing process by which it was made … It provides the satisfaction of transforming a stack of materials into a tangible, recognizable finished object, often by way of a therapeutically repetitive process. Craft’s magic trick is that it’s play that’s been designed to look like work.”

“What Langlands is advocating for in his book is more widespread knowledge about the time when craft was integral to daily life. In the era he studies, activities like beekeeping weren’t escapes from reality, but essential to it. He also smartly notes that neither ‘craft’ nor ‘craeft’ is a synonym for ‘working with one’s hands.’ At its root, the word ‘manufacture,’ which is associated with mass production, means ‘to make by hand’ … Langlands calls for living and working with awareness of our environments, materials, and challenges in real time.”

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