How IKEA changed the shopping experience

The Washington Post: IKEA, “which has 412 locations in more than 40 countries, has become an international empire. Its sprawling stores with their tortuously winding routes have continued to thrive in an era of hurried online shopping. Analysts say Ikea has been successful in not only getting shoppers to linger for hours, but also getting them to come back, over and over, whether for mattresses or meatballs.”

Warren Shoulberg, a consultant, comments: “Before Ikea came along, furniture shopping was a laborious task that a lot of people dreaded because they felt like they were making a decision they had to live with for 30 years. Then Ikea showed up and said, you can buy something and use it for a couple of years — or you can keep it longer — but this isn’t necessarily something you’re going to pass down to your kids or your grandkids. That was a remarkable transition.”

“The retailer has also been successful, he added, in creating a shopping destination. Traditional furniture stores may line up all of their sofas in one section and beds in another, but Ikea displays items by room, so shoppers can see how different pieces might look together … Its success has also given way to a cottage industry of businesses that specialize in assembling Ikea furniture. Ikea itself has gotten into the fray: In September, it purchased TaskRabbit, a start-up that providers contractors for odd jobs, to appeal to a generation of time-strapped consumers who want Ikea furniture without the hassle of assembling it.”

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Retail Theater: The Shellfish Spa

Supermarket News: “Retailers say making the shopping trip an experience is one way they can drive traffic into their stores. And a little theater in the seafood department is actually helping to drive sales, according to one Northeast retailer, Shoprite, which has added the Shellfish Spa. The device preserves live product such as clams, oysters, mussels, steamers and cockles while presenting them in an eye-catching display. The container bathes shellfish in a continuous stream of saltwater and maintains an ocean-like environment for peak freshness.”

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Burger Serf: How Many Whoppers Per Second?

The Verge: A new Burger King ad explains “the concept of net neutrality with a stunt that showed what it would be like to have paid prioritization in a burger joint. In the ad, actors playing Burger King employees taunt ‘actual guests’ by making them wait for absurd amounts of time to receive their food — unless they pay huge tolls to get it quickly.”

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Why Do Pizza Chains Attract Republicans?

Morning Consult: “Large pizza chains accounted for 36.5% of sales in states that President Donald Trump won in 2016, compared to 23% of sales in states that voted for Hillary Clinton … Pizza industry experts suggest the popularity of major chains in traditionally conservative states — and to some extent, price and the level of more premium toppings — could be reasons for the political divide.”

A theory: “While pizza was plentiful in Italian immigrants’ urban communities along the East Coast around the turn of the 20th century, it was sparse elsewhere in the United States. It wasn’t until the late 1950s and early 1960s, when companies like Pizza Hut, Domino’s and Little Caesars cropped up in the Midwest, that pizza was brought to the wider American public. During the industry’s early years, when chains were starting, companies focused their marketing on lower-income neighborhoods and presented pizza as an inexpensive dinner option in those Midwestern hubs.”

Carol Helstosky, author of Pizza: A Global History, comments: “If we think about this in culinary terms, the emphasis is on cost, reliability, standardization and efficiency … Food historians might label these culinary values conservative, in the sense that the consumer wants the same product, and qualities like fast delivery matter more than particular ingredients or the overall taste.”

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Jen Yee: The Architecture of Dessert

The New York Times: Jen Yee “who oversees pastry for all the restaurants in the Resurgens Hospitality Group, used to be an architect, and she designs desserts the way she once did building interiors: meticulously sketching every element, testing many prototypes. And these days she has plenty of company: Many of the country’s top pastry chefs have practiced or studied architecture.”

“Tired of having to abide by mundane building codes and regulations, and wanting something more creative, she began studying pastry in 2002 at Le Cordon Bleu in London, while working as a pastry assistant at the Connaught hotel for the chefs Gordon Ramsay and Angela Hartnett. She found that her architectural training applied in the pastry kitchen as well.”

She comments: “Being an architect is not all about the structure. It’s about the intent. How will this improve someone’s life? Desserts are also about thoughtfulness. What are the ways I can manipulate this apple? What will highlight what’s grown here? It’s about looking at your environment and seeing what will be functional and beautiful in that space.”

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Drone Promo: The Kentucky Flying Object

The Verge: KFC’s “new, India-only Smoky Grilled Wings will come packaged in a box with detachable drone parts. Although customers will have to look up instructions online, they can eventually assemble the box and its parts to turn it into a Bluetooth-connected drone.”

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Late & Great: Herb Schmertz

The New York Times: “Herbert Schmertz, an aggressive and innovative public relations man who, as a Mobil Oil executive, pioneered the use of company-written ‘advertorials’ during the energy shortages of the 1970s, died on Wednesday in West Palm Beach, Fla. He was 87 … In addition to urging Mobil to go on the offensive at a time when Big Oil was being demonized, Mr. Schmertz had the company engage in image enhancement by association. He arranged for the company to sponsor the PBS series Masterpiece Theate when it began in 1971 as well as Mystery! and other public television programs later.”

“Critical of the news media, Mr. Schmertz advocated what he called creative confrontation — a markedly different approach from that of most companies, which tried to do their influencing behind the scenes … in October 1970, Mr. Schmertz began buying space on the Op-Ed page of The New York Times to express the company’s views in essay form. Sometimes the essays responded to the news of the moment; other times they addressed broader issues, like mass transit. They advertorials appeared in other newspapers as well, and Mr. Schmertz made scores of television appearances.”

“Although few public-relations specialists today would take as abrasive a tack as Mr. Schmertz sometimes did, the modern media landscape is full of advertiser-influenced or controlled content that calls to mind his early forays into advertorials. On his retirement from Mobil in 1988, he was asked to name his greatest achievement.” He told the New York Times: “I think that Mobil has made it respectable for companies to have views, opinions and philosophies and to express them.”

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Schmidt’s Toothpaste: For Fresh, Charcoal-y Breath

Fast Company: “Unilever recently acquired Schmidt’s Naturals for its millennial-friendly natural deodorants, and now the Portland-based startup is taking on another bathroom shelf staple: Toothpaste … Much like the company’s popular deodorant line, which comes in unconventional scents like rose vanilla and lavender sage, the toothpaste collection reimagines the flavors we swish and spit. Think activated charcoal with mint, vanilla chai, and coconut with lime in bright, modern tubes that starkly differ from more hippie-esque natural brands.”

“Schmidt’s Naturals cofounder and CEO Michael Cammarata tells Fast Company he saw a ripe opportunity to translate modern consumer scent preferences for personal care products. While customers adamantly want oral care that leaves them feeling fresh, the company’s research found that could also extend into citrus and floral flavors.”

“It remains to be seen whether consumers will be drawn to the product for its main selling point: Health. Schmidt’s Naturals is free of potentially harmful ingredients, and its packaging proudly touts vitamin and superfood extracts … Cammarata is confident that the health-conscious tide is growing, and with that, so will society’s view of what they put on and in their body. Indeed, a recent study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine found that consumer complaints of adverse health events related to personal care products more than doubled last year.”

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‘Stealing’ at the Amazon Go

Nick Wingfield: “There were a little over 3.5 million cashiers in the United States in 2016 — and some of their jobs may be in jeopardy if the technology behind Amazon Go eventually spreads. For now, Amazon says its technology simply changes the role of employees — the same way it describes the impact of automation on its warehouse workers … Store employees mill about ready to help customers find items, and there is a kitchen next door with chefs preparing meals for sale in the store. Because there are no cashiers, an employee sits in the wine and beer section of the store, checking I.D.s before customers can take alcohol off the shelves.”

“At Amazon Go, checking out feels like — there’s no other way to put it — shoplifting. It is only a few minutes after walking out of the store, when Amazon sends an electronic receipt for purchases, that the feeling goes away.”

“A big unanswered question is where Amazon plans to take the technology. It won’t say whether it plans to open more Amazon Go stores, or leave this as a one-of-a-kind novelty. A more intriguing possibility is that it could use the technology inside Whole Foods stores … There’s even speculation that Amazon could sell the system to other retailers, much as it sells its cloud computing services to other companies. For now, visitors to Amazon Go may want to watch their purchases: Without a register staring them in the face at checkout, it’s easy to overspend.”

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