Cult of Queue: The Thrill of The Wait

The New York Times: “Theolus Jackson slouched against the stanchion separating him from the entrance of Supreme, the streetwear emporium on Lafayette Street in SoHo. He had registered on the company’s website to pick up a ticket assuring him a spot near the head of a line that by 10 a.m. that day spooled around the corner toward Broadway.” He comments: “Most of the time I have my music, so I’m not bothered. I come every week — I like the vibe — and I just chill.”

Jeff Carvalho of Highsnobiety explains: “These kids don’t come to go into the store. They want to be in the line. The line is the new community. When 200 to 300 kids are lining up outside of a store, it’s because they want to be part of something.”

“Today, the queue is partly a resellers’ market: energetic young entrepreneurs snapping up wares in multiples, then flipping them at soaring markups on eBay or selling them for pocket change to finance their own buys … For many others, though, the wait itself is sufficient reward.” Noah Callahan-Bever, the editor of Complex, observes: “The death of the shopping center has created this void in kids’ lives. It’s being filled in part by this society of kids, some known to each other only from the internet, all of them into this niche product that acts as a social identifier. For them, standing in line for a T-shirt or baseball cap is a way of telling the world that you know about something that not everyone is hip to.”

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