How Big is the ‘Store Brand’ Threat?

The Wall Street Journal: “Supermarkets’ ‘private label’ goods have historically been less important in the U.S. than in other mature markets … But now the big European discounters are expanding in the U.S.Lidl launched on June 15 with six stores in North Carolina, just a few days after its key rival, Aldi, unveiled a five-year, $5 billion U.S. expansion plan. These expansion efforts themselves don’t need to succeed. The threat alone will hasten the shift of U.S. grocery toward private label.”

“The more upscale team of Amazon and Whole Foods will speed the push into private label. The tech giant has been plowing resources into its AmazonBasics range; the Whole Foods equivalent, 365 Everyday Value, anchors the grocer’s new, compact store format, 365. Ever attuned to millennial trends, Silicon Valley has even thrown up an online retailer called Brandless that sells $3 health-conscious, private-label goods.”

“Some companies look less exposed than others. Those with big overseas operations, such as Nestlé, Unilever UL or Mondelez, or must-have brands, like Kraft Heinz, stand a better chance of seeing off the new competition than those with U.S.-centric portfolios or lots of third or fourth-placed brands. Bernstein thinks Campbell’s, Conagra, General Mills, Kellogg and Smucker’s are all at risk.”

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