Late & Great: Jens Risom

The New York Times: “Jens Risom, the Danish furniture maestro who helped bring midcentury modern design to the United States through his work with Knoll Studio, died on Dec. 9 at his home in New Canaan, Conn. He was 100. Defined by sharp Scandinavian lines and fused with the rustic aura of Shakerism and American arts and crafts, the armless, affordable chair that became Mr. Risom’s signature in 1942 was one of the first mass-produced modernist furniture pieces introduced in the United States and not Europe.”

“Materials were hard to come by during the war, so Mr. Risom designed a chair with simple wooden legs and for upholstery used nothing other than surplus parachute straps. The surprise was that Mr. Risom’s creation — one of 15 pieces he designed for Knoll’s debut collection, and perhaps too humble to ever be described as a masterpiece — was almost comfortable enough to sleep in.”

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“What resonates about it is that it’s not fancy,” said Wendy Goodman of New York magazine. “To Ms. Goodman … there was a certain logic to the way Mr. Risom went to the United States and helped remind people there about the beauty of its unfussy design history.” She observes: “Maybe it takes someone coming here to do that, because he romanticized the freedom and the openness of America, and that’s what’s so wonderful about his furniture.”

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