Introducing the Meat-O-Mat!

The Wall Street Journal: “Attached to a laboratory-like plant in this upstate community is a neon-lit vending machine dubbed the Meat-O-Mat, where customers can buy locally raised meat whenever they like. If Joshua Applestone has his way, carnivores will flock to it the way that banking customers visit the ATM. His invention is stocked with pork chops, dry-aged burger patties, bratwurst meatballs and his beloved pork roll, a deli meat native to New Jersey. Customers swipe their credit cards, push a button, slide the door open and retrieve their hormone- and antibiotic-free selection.”

“Mr. Applestone and his partners at Applestone Meat Co., the attached plant, are attempting to develop a new, meat-centric business model. For the past two years, they have been exploring ways of making high-quality cuts available at lower prices by slashing labor costs and considering offbeat distribution methods like the Meat-O-Mat. ‘We’re going for a highway-roadside-attraction type of approach,’ said Samantha Gloffke, the company’s general manager and a part owner. ‘The goal is to make sustainability really exciting.'”

Mr. Applestone envisions them stationed at supermarkets, football stadiums and picnic sites, places where you might welcome the convenience of buying something to toss on the grill. ‘Think about it at any music festival,’ he said. ‘Anywhere someone brings a cooler, you no longer have to bring fresh meat. How much is peace of mind worth?'”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Wafu Chuka: Probably Not The Next Ramen Noodles

The New York Times: The restaurant Saburi has been an unassuming presence on a quiet street in the Manhattan neighborhood of Kips Bay for 10 years … From evening until 3 a.m., Saburi becomes a lively canteen filled with Japanese businessmen, Japanese expatriates and American enthusiasts of Japanese culture … The cuisine is called wafu chuka and is, simply put, Japanese-style Chinese food, or rather, Chinese dishes modified for Japanese sensibilities. It involves putting a Japanese spin on Chinese cuisine by using fewer spices and oils and adding fresh Japanese ingredients.”

Wafu Chuka “emerged in the early 1900s during the Meiji Restoration period, when Japan was opened up to international trade. It originated in cities including Nagasaki, Kobe and Yokohama … and is eaten throughout Japan … At the restaurant, female bartenders wear short Chinese dresses. Shadow puppets, the paper-thin figurines used in the ancient Chinese storytelling form, are framed on walls … And customers can store unfinished bottles of shochu, a Japanese liquor, behind the bar for future consumption — a tradition in pubs in the island nation.”

Sadly, Saburi is closing because of “lease difficulties” and its husband-and-wife owners, Jun Cui (who is Chinese) and Mika Saburi (who is Japanese) “desire to move back to Japan.” Kiara Phillips, a regular, comments: “The problem is it’s not like the ramen boom. Everyone is crazy for ramen now. And the wafu chuka style never quite took off that way. But is that a bad thing? It means people didn’t take it over and start doing it wrong,” she said. “No one else is trying to make it the best. No one is trying to make it something it’s not. The way it is here is just the way it is done.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail